-2

I have implemented a method that converts a given array of characters into a decimal integer. The method takes every character out of the array, calculates its decimal value and multiplys it with 10^n, where n gets incremeted with every iteration.

So for example the array 4711 would be converted like this. 1*10^0 + 1*10^1 + 7*10^2 + 4*10^3 = 4711 as decimal value.

My question now is how to extend the functionality so the stringTOint method is also able to handle octal and hexal values, e.g. 023 or 0x1A.

/** Converts the given array of characters into a decimal integer */
int stringTOint(char str[]) {
int i, flag, offset, n,base;
flag = 0;
base = 10;
char c = '0';
/*if the first char in the array is '-', the minus flag gets set */
if (str[0] == '-') {
    flag = -1;
}
if (flag == -1) {
    offset = 1;
} else {
    offset = 0;
}
if(offset == 0) {
    if (str[0] == '0' && (str[1] != 'x' && str[1] != 'X') ) {
        base = 8;  // Octal
    } else if (str[0] == '0' && (str[1] == 'x' || str[1] == 'X')) {
        base = 16; // Hexadecimal
        offset = offset + 2;
    }
}else if(offset == 1) {
    if (str[1] == '0' && (str[2] != 'x' && str[2] != 'X') ) {
        base = 8;  // Octal
    } else if (str[1] == '0' && (str[2] == 'x' || str[2] == 'X')) {
        base = 16; // Hexadecimal
        offset = offset + 2;
    }
}
n = 0;
/*Loop runs until terminating NULL gets found in array */
for (i = offset; str[i] != '\0'; i++) {
    n = n * base + str[i] - c;
}
/*value becomes negative if the negative flag was set */
if (flag == -1) {
    n = -n;
}
/* n gets returned */
return n;
}
  • 1
    Just to be sure: you do know that there is a standard library function that does what you coded here as well as what you want to add? – usr2564301 Nov 28 '18 at 11:14
  • 1
    You already know how to check for negative numbers. What makes you think that checking for the '0' prefix (possibly followed by 'x' or 'X') would be much different? – Some programmer dude Nov 28 '18 at 11:16
  • 1
    The 10 in the expression n * 10 is for the base. Use a variable for the base. Then add special cases for 'A' to 'F' (isalpha is very useful for that) if base == 16. You could also add a check for 8 and 9 if base == 8. – Some programmer dude Nov 28 '18 at 11:20
  • 1
    Oh and note that while str[i] - '0' is well-defined for digits, the corresponding for characters (e.g. str[i] - 'A') is not defined by the C standard (though it works for ASCII which is arguably the only encoding you will probably encounter anyway). – Some programmer dude Nov 28 '18 at 11:23
  • 1
    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the code was updated and now doesn't contain errors – anatolyg Nov 28 '18 at 12:09
0

You are not handling the cases A to F for hexa decimal values.

   for (i = offset; str[i] != '\0'; i++) {
       int value = (str[i] > ='A' && stri[i]<='F')? (str[i]-'A'+10):(str[i]-'0');
       n = n * base + value;
    }

That is if char is A to F, just subtract A from char and add 10 to get the hexa decimal representation.

Note: You need to use %X or %x to print in hexadecimal notation.

  • Im not sure if I get that notation. So the first part (str[i] > ='A' && stri[i]<='B')? checks the condition and based on the outcome it takes either (str[i]-'A'+10) or (str[i]-'0'). – Trikalium Nov 28 '18 at 12:17
  • Yes. I had typo just corrected it (str[i] > ='A' && stri[i]<='B') --> (str[i] > ='A' && stri[i]<='F') – kiran Biradar Nov 28 '18 at 12:23
0

Another approach is to have an array of valid digits. Use strchr to check if the digit is valid. If valid, the difference between the pointers is the value to add without having to subtract character constants.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int stringTOint(char *str, int *number) {
    char *digits = "0123456789";//pointer to string literal
    char *valid = NULL;
    char add = 0;
    int sign = 1;
    int base = 10;

    *number = 0;
    while ( ' ' == *str || '\t' == *str) {
        str++;//skip leading spaces tabs
    }
    if ( '-' == *str || '+' == *str) {
        if ( '-' == *str) {
            sign = -1;
        }
        str++;
    }
    if ( '0' == *str) {
        digits = "01234567";//assign pointer to different string literal
        base = 8;
        str++;
        if ( 'x' == *str) {//lowercase
            digits = "0123456789abcdef";
            base = 16;
            str++;
        }
        if ( 'X' == *str && '0' == *(str - 1)) {//uppercase
            digits = "0123456789ABCDEF";
            base = 16;
            str++;
        }
    }
    while (*str) {//not at terminating zero
        if ( ( valid = strchr ( digits, *str))) {//is a valid digit
            add = valid - digits;//value to add is difference between pointers
            *number = *number * base + add;
            str++;
        }
        else {
            *number = 0;
            return 0;//not a valid digit
        }
    }

    *number = *number * sign;
    return 1;
}

int main ( void) {
    char text[100] = "";
    int value = 0;

    do {
        printf ( "enter an integer\n\t(leading 0 octal or leading 0x hexal)\n\tor enter done\n");
        if ( fgets ( text, sizeof text, stdin)) {
            if ( '\n' == text[0]) {
                break;//exit on empty line
            }
            text[strcspn ( text, "\n")] = 0;//remove newline
            if ( stringTOint ( text, &value)) {
                printf ( "decimal value = %d\n", value);
            }
            else {
                printf ( "\n\tinput problem [%s]\n\n", text);
            }
        }
        else {
            fprintf ( stderr, "fgets EOF\n");
            return 0;
        }
    } while ( strcmp ( text, "done"));//exit if input is done
    return 0;
}

Add

    if ( 'b' == *str) {
        digits = "01";//assign pointer to different string literal
        base = 2;
        str++;
    }

before

    while (*str) {//not at terminating zero

and binary value may be processeed using an input such as b1101

To allow for a mix of upper and lower case in hexal values, remove the entire if block for uppercase, include ctype.h and change

if ( 'x' == *str) {

to

if ( 'x' == *str || 'X' == *str) {

and change

if ( ( valid = strchr ( digits, *str))) {

to

if ( ( valid = strchr ( digits, tolower ( *str)))) {
  • Curiously, this will not cause an error on 0xX0. Fortunately, OP is broad enough with that question to not have considered bad input at all. So a plus of such a badly stated question is that you are free to interpret such side effects any which way you want! – usr2564301 Nov 28 '18 at 14:51
  • .. Although limiting a string to 0x to lowercase hex and 0X to uppercase hex is going too far! I've retracted my previous upvote for that. – usr2564301 Nov 28 '18 at 14:52
-1

My idea was to check the current char in the array if it is a decimal(so 0-9), or if it is an letter(so A-F) and then change the -'0' to -'A' and if it is a letter and vice versa if it is a decimal number.

for (i = offset; str[i] != '\0'; i++) {
    if(str[i]==/*ABCDEF*/) {
     c = 'A';
} else if( str[i]==/*0123456789*/) {
        c = '0';
    }
    n = n * base + str[i] - c;
}

But I am unsure how to check the current character, because it only needs to be ONE of those and there should be a better way then to do 9 if statements and combine them with logical or.

  • Checkout my below answer it tells you how to handle. – kiran Biradar Nov 28 '18 at 12:14

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