2

I'm brand new to coding and simply learning how to call members of a class. If I want to create and store multiple fields and access them from the console, please recommend the proper way of doing this. I've been told multiple public variables in classes are not efficient. Please advise. Thank you!

public class MainClass
{

    class IronMan
    {
        public string fName = "Tony";
        public string lName = "Stark";
        public int Age = 50;

    }

    class CaptainAmerica
    {
        public string fName = "Steve";
        public string lName = "Rogers";
        public int Age = 126;
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        CaptainAmerica avenger = new CaptainAmerica();
        Console.WriteLine(avenger.fName);
    }  
}
  • 4
    IronMan and CaptainAmerica should not be classes, but instances of the same class. – bolov Nov 28 '18 at 19:22
  • You need to have public getters and setters, such as "public string fName { get; set; }". Functionally, it would behave the same right now, but it would give you more options (like only allowing last names to be changed for example). Also, it's not about efficiency, but control. – UnhandledExcepSean Nov 28 '18 at 19:26
  • Yeah, create a class called SuperHero, with public (string) properties called "FirstName", "LastName" and a public integer property called Age. Then you can create Captain American this way var captainAmerica = new SuperHero { FirstName = "Tony", LastName = "Stark", Age = 50 }; – Flydog57 Nov 28 '18 at 19:32
  • I don't believe there is a reason to have nested classes here, I wouldn't define a class inside a class unless you have a reason too. – Scriven Nov 28 '18 at 19:43
  • @bolov yea, but that if you only want to have some properties. How are you going to implement hero-specific action in this case, if your class had actually to do something as per hero specification? – T.S. Nov 28 '18 at 20:03
8

IronMan and CaptainAmerica should be objects instead of classes, the class should be generic

In your example, your class should be SuperHero for example

public class SuperHero
{
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public int Age { get; set; }

    public SuperHero(string FirstName, string LastName, int Age)
    {
        this.FirstName = FirstName;
        this.LastName = LastName;
        this.Age = Age;        
    }
}

then, in your Main() you should create instances of SuperHero

public class MainClass
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        //This is a instance of SuperHero, specific, Tony Stark
        SuperHero ironman = new SuperHero("Tony","Stark",50);
        Console.WriteLine(ironman.FirstName);
        //This is a instance of SuperHero, specific, Steve Rogers
        SuperHero captain = new SuperHero("Steve","Rogers",126);
        Console.WriteLine(captain.FirstName);
    }
}

I recommend you to read about OO before start programming (asuming you will use Object Oriented paradigm)

0

I think you're better off with the following approach:

public class MainClass
{

    class Hero
    {
        public string FirstName {get; set;}
        public string LastName {get; set;}
        public int Age {get; set;}
    }

    public static void Main()
    {
        Hero avenger = new Hero
        {
            FirstName = "Steve",
            LastName = "Rogers",
            Age = 126
        };

        Console.WriteLine(avenger.FirstName);
    }  
}

As far as what properties to make public in a class, a general rule of thumb is to only make the properties public if they have to be and you should generally use the most restrictive access modifiers you can which still allow your application to function. Unnecessarily exposing properties of a class can cause other classes to misuse that class in ways that weren't originally intended and often create complications in large applications. There are a lot of topics this touches on that you can read more about but one of the more directly related topics is the concept of information hiding.

0

If you need in future doing some different for IronMan or CaptainAmerica - then better make base class or interface and inherit from it like:

public class Hero
{
  public string fName;
  public string lName;
  public int Age;
  public override string ToString()  // for easy "access them from the console"
  {
    return $"{fName}:{lName}:{Age}";
  }
}
class IronMan:Hero
{
}
class CaptainAmerica:Hero
{
}

and use it:

Hero iron = new IronMan() { fName = "i", lName = "in", Age = 10 };
Hero cap = new CaptainAmerica() { fName = "c", lName = "cn", Age = 10 };

Console.WriteLine(iron.ToString());
Console.WriteLine(cap.ToString());

or do something based on type:

Hero noname = iron;
//.....
noname = new CaptainAmerica() { fName = "c", lName = "cnn", Age = 15 };
//.....
if (noname.GetType()==typeof(IronMan))
{
  //do for iron
}

(but better way for last - use inheritance and patterns approach)

  • This is duplicate of answer I have here. Try to be genuine – T.S. Nov 29 '18 at 14:54
  • @T.S. Looks like question's author new to objects/patterns. Here classes plus example of using via base class/interface - just definition can be not directly understand. // obviously DRY, need to define props in one place - a) class without hero type marker (if not needed) or b) class with some hero type marker or c) class/interface inheritance - according to patterns idea d) maybe struct or something else. You and my approach just more right/usual for now days - like 4 wheels for car. Just added example of using. – AndrewF Dec 1 '18 at 5:48
0

In your case you wanted to creat an Avenger. Any Avenger has common propperties (fname, lname, age) so when you create an Avenger with the constructor you have to give the values for thos propperties.

   public class MainClass
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            Avenger CaptainAmerica = new Avenger("Steve", "Rogers", 126);
            Avenger IronMan = new Avenger ("Tony", "Stark", 50);
            Console.WriteLine(CaptainAmerica.fName); // Steve
            Console.WriteLine(IronMan.fName); // Tony

        }  
    }



public class Avenger
{
    public string fName {get; set;};
    public string lName {get; set;};
    public int Age {get; set;};

    Public Avenger (string fname, string lname, int age){
          this.fName = fname;
          this.lName = lname;
          this.Age = age;
    }
}
  • 1
    the question is about C#, can you modify your answer to fit please? – Juan Salvador Portugal Nov 28 '18 at 19:43
  • 1
    @JuanSalvadorPortugal Pseudo-code is acceptable form – T.S. Nov 28 '18 at 19:50
0

There is not much you can do with POCOs as other examples show. If you want your class to actually do something you need to do this

public abstract class SuperHero
{
    public string FirstName { get; protected set; }
    public string LastName { get; protected set; }
    public int Age { get; protected set; }

    public abstract void KillEnemy(IEnemy e);

}


public class IronMan : SuperHero
{
    public IronMan() : base()
    {
        FirstName = "Tony";
        LastName = "Stark";
        Age = 50;
    }


    public overrides void KillEnemy(IEnemy e)
    {
        // Do what IronMan does to enemy  
    }

}

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