1

This question already has an answer here:

This question has probably been asked and answerd a thousand times before, but I don't know if it's because of SEO, I've not found a suitable solution. I either get undefined or blank text in Chrome.

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (a, b) => {
    console.log(this.value);
});

This keeps returning undefined in the console I've also tried:

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (a, b) => {
       console.log(b);
    });

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (a, b) => {
       console.log($(this).val());
    });

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (a, b) => {
       console.log(a.value);
    });

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (a, b) => {
       console.log(b.value);
    });

Any idea's would be very appreciated.

marked as duplicate by Mosh Feu, Community Nov 29 '18 at 15:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6

The this keyword will not work us you expect since you're using es6 arrow function format what will change the context, use e.target instead of it.

Take a look at What does “this” refer to in arrow functions in ES6?

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (e) => {
  console.log(e.target.value);
});
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<input type="text" value="test">

  • Wow that solved it! I didn't know the fat arrow changed the way returning values work! – Ezrab_ Nov 29 '18 at 15:06
  • Yes take a look to Arrow functions vs Fat arrow functions – Zakaria Acharki Nov 29 '18 at 15:07
  • 'e.target.value.test' why is this than not possible? – Ezrab_ Nov 29 '18 at 15:11
  • The values attribute has no test property, what you want to get exactly? – Zakaria Acharki Nov 29 '18 at 15:13
  • 1
    It should be new RegExp("your_regex").test(e.target.value); – Zakaria Acharki Nov 29 '18 at 15:16
3

This is because you are using arrow function the scope of which is different from normal function.

Normally you can replace arrow function with conventional function expression & use $(this) or use the target object from event handler to get the value of the input

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', function(a, b) {
  console.log($(this).val());
});

$('input[type="text"]').on('input', (a, b) => {
  console.log(a.target.value);
});
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.3.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<input type='text'>

  • 1
    This is identical to the other answer :| – Mosh Feu Nov 29 '18 at 15:07
  • @MoshFeu take a better look – brk Nov 29 '18 at 15:08
  • You added now the regular function method.. Nice. – Mosh Feu Nov 29 '18 at 15:09
  • That was added even before your first comment. Please validate it from revision history – brk Nov 29 '18 at 15:11
  • When you right, you right :) – Mosh Feu Nov 29 '18 at 15:13

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