1

Let's consider this example :

Employee     Function   Start_dept   End_dept
A               dev          10        13
A               dev          11        12
A               test          9         9
A               dev          13        11

What I want to select is employee, their function and the distinct departments in BOTH "start" and "end" department. It will give this result :

Employee     Function  count_distinct_dept
A                 dev          4
A                 test         1            `

For the dev A, we have only 4 distinct departments (10, 11, 12 and 13) because we shouldn't count duplicate values in the 2 columns (start and end).

How can I do this ? (I'm using mySQL). Is it possible to do this on one request without any JOIN or any UNION ? Or is it obligatory to use one of them ? Since I am using a huge database (with more than 3 billions lines), I am not sure if a join or union request will be optimal...

4
  • create a new column "ColumnX" computed as end_dep*100+start_dep. Use this column in Group By expression. For performance create a unique index. – NoChance Dec 2 '18 at 18:23
  • what version of mysql do you use? you could maybe to it with windowing functions. – devanand Dec 2 '18 at 20:31
  • @NoChance why calculate end_dept*100 ?? I don't get this point at all... – salamanka44 Dec 5 '18 at 9:36
  • This allows you to map the 2 values to a single value that can be used in sorting and grouping. Hence, it could be used in DISTINCT clause. In your case, the new column would have the values:10+130, 11+120, 9+90, 13+110. Instead of multiplying by 10 you could multiply by a small prime value such as 7. – NoChance Dec 5 '18 at 9:48
2

Use a union all and aggregation:

select Employee, Function, count(distinct dept)
from ((select Employee, Function, Start_dept as dept
       from e
      ) union all
      (select  Employee, Function, End_dept
       from e
      )
     ) e
group by Employee, Function;

If you want performance, I would suggest starting with two indexes on (Employee, Function, Start_Dept) and (Employee, Function, End_Dept). Then:

select Employee, Function, count(distinct dept)
from ((select distinct Employee, Function, Start_dept as dept
       from e
      ) union all
      (select distinct Employee, Function, End_dept
       from e
      )
     ) e
group by Employee, Function;

The subqueries should be scanning the index rather than the overall table. You will still need to do the final GROUP BY. I am guessing that COUNT(DISTINCT) is a better approach than UNION in the subquery, but you could test that.

1
  • Is it possible to do it without an union ? I am using a huge database (with more than 3 billions lines) and I am not sure union request is optimal... – salamanka44 Dec 2 '18 at 18:12

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