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I have a huge table (log) which keeps some history data. It has more than 10 columns:

Id, Year, Month, Day, data1, data2, data3, ......

Because the table is huge, it has lots of index on it.

The system keeps inserting lots of new data into this table. However, because of the way the system works, sometimes, duplidated data will be inserted (only id is different). The duplications' id (id only) are also inserted into another table (log_existing). We have another service which will delete the duplications in both tables. Here is what we are doing now.

SET @TotalRows = 0;
SET @Rows = 0;
WHILE 1=1
BEGIN
    DECLARE @Ids TABLE (id BIGINT);

    INSERT INTO @Ids
    SELECT TOP (@BatchSize) Id 
    FROM Log

    DELETE FROM Log WHERE Id IN (SELECT id FROM @Ids)
    DELETE FROM Log_Existing WHERE Id IN (SELECT id FROM @Ids)

    SET @Rows = @@ROWCOUNT
    IF(@Rows < @BatchSize)
    BEGIN
        BREAK;
    END
    SET @TotalRows = @TotalRows + @Rows
    IF(@TotalRows >= @DeleteSize)
    BEGIN
        BREAK;
    END
    SET @Rows = 0;
END

Basically, the service runs every 2 minutes (or 5 minutes, configurable) to run this batch delete. The @BatchSize = 2000 and @DeleteSize = 1000000, which usually runs more than 2/5 minutes.

It works ok for some time. But now we realize that there are too many dupliactions, this process can not delete duplications fast enough. So, the database size grows larger and larger, and process is slower and slower.

Is there a way to make it faster? or some kind of guideline?

Thanks

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  • Do you have a retention policy for these logs? You don't keep old logs around forever, do you? Dec 2, 2018 at 18:20
  • yes. 1 year or 2 years, depends. that's why the database is huge. sometimes, can reach more than 2TB.
    – urlreader
    Dec 2, 2018 at 18:39
  • Depends on what? Unless these are records kept for auditing purposes (in which case you probably need something in your business logic that's more robust than a mere log), it's unlikely that you need these logs for more than a few months. Dec 2, 2018 at 18:58
  • You should share table schema with indexes, do you have index on Id column?
    – codemirror
    Dec 2, 2018 at 19:00

2 Answers 2

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I would try to avoid inserting duplicates into the Log table. From your description this should be possible including some of the columns which make an entry unique (besides the Id).

One option is using the IGNORE_DUP_KEY option on an unique index. When such an index is existing and the INSERT statement tries to insert a row that violates the index's unique constraint the INSERT will be ignored. See Microsoft SQL Server Help.

CREATE TABLE #Test (C1 nvarchar(10), C2 nvarchar(50), C3 datetime);  
GO  
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX AK_Index ON #Test (C2)  
    WITH (IGNORE_DUP_KEY = ON);  
GO  
INSERT INTO #Test VALUES (N'OC', N'Ounces', GETDATE());  
INSERT INTO #Test SELECT * FROM Production.UnitMeasure;  
GO  
SELECT COUNT(*)AS [Number of rows] FROM #Test;  
GO  
DROP TABLE #Test;  
GO
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I think if you use delete statement with the JOIN clause something like this. It should do better.

    DELETE Log, Log_Existing FROM Log, Log_Existing 
    WHERE Log.LOGID=Log_Existing.LOGID
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