1

I will be using a few string names throughout my app for my Notifications and UserDefault names.

I have heard that for type safety it's a good practice to define your notification names or UserDefaults key names as static strings and make them part of a class or struct.

What is the most common way to handle string names for your Notification and UserDefault names?

I have thought about putting them in my AppDelgate class as global variables as follow...

let MY_STRING_NAME = "My string name"

class AppDelegate: UIResponder, UIApplicationDelegate {}

/// Then just use MY_STRING_NAME in other classes. 

Or

class SomeClass {
    let myStringName:String = "My string name"
}
/// Then use myClassInstance.myStringName

What is the best approach?

4

One option for UserDefaults is to create a helper class that hides the fact that you are using UserDefaults. This makes it appear to the rest of your code just like you are using a simple class and its properties.

Something like this:

class MyAppPreferences {
    static let shared = MyAppPreferences()

    private let highScoreKey = "highScore"
    var highScore: Int {
        get {
            return UserDefaults.standard.integer(forKey: highScoreKey)
        }
        set {
            UserDefaults.standard.set(newValue, forKey: highScoreKey)
        }
    }
}

On other code you can do this to set it:

MyAppPreferences.shared.highScore = 100

or the following to read it:

let score = MyAppPreferences.shared.highScore

Add a computed property and private key for each app preference needed in your app. This makes the rest of your code much cleaner.

And in for some reason you need to change how one or more of the preferences are stored in the future, you only need to change the code in one place.

For notification names, you can add constants to each class the notification is associated with. You see this pattern in many iOS classes such as UIApplication, UITextView, and others.

class SomeClass {
    static someClassEventNotification = NSNotification.Name("someUniqueName")
}
  • Wow, I really like your suggestion about UserDefaults, I love it. – fs_tigre Dec 3 '18 at 3:17
  • I’m not exactly sure how would I use your approach for managing notification names if for instance I want to sand a notification from the AppDelegate/applicationWillEnterForeground class to my main View Controller class. Would you mind elaborating a little bit more? – fs_tigre Dec 3 '18 at 3:30
  • 2
    You wouldn't use your own notification for that nor would you do anything in the app delegate. Simply have the view controller register for the existing UIApplication.willEnterForegroundNotification notification. – rmaddy Dec 3 '18 at 4:55
  • the op needs to know best way to create keys not to create the way data is stored – Sh_Khan Dec 3 '18 at 9:32
  • in this answer the op question is related to how to manage this private let highScoreKey = "highScore" not how to save – Sh_Khan Dec 3 '18 at 9:43
1

I think using enum is more appropriate way to define constants

User Defaults:

class MyAppPreferences {
    static let shared = MyAppPreferences()

    private enum Key: String {
        case userName
        case email
    }

    var userName: String? {
        get {
            return UserDefaults.standard.string(forKey: Key.userName.rawValue)
        }
        set {
            UserDefaults.standard.set(newValue, forKey: Key.userName.rawValue)
        }
    }
}

Notification:

enum AppNotification: String {
    case didReceivedData
    case didCompleteTask
}

extension Notification.Name {
    init(_ appNotification:AppNotification) {
        self.init(appNotification.rawValue)
    }
}

//Use:

func notify() {
    NotificationCenter.default.post(.init(name: .init(.didReceivedData)))
} 
0

The common approach is creating

struct Constants { 
   static let key1 = "value1"
   static let key2 = "value2"
   .....
}

// for notifications

extension Notification.Name {
  static let didReceiveData = Notification.Name("didReceiveData")
  static let didCompleteTask = Notification.Name("didCompleteTask")
}

some guys prefer global variables with ( k letter prefix )

let kDomain = "value1"

dates to #define in Objective-C , but using Constants is a clean way to code readers

  • That’s a lot for the suggestions. Would you mind showing me how would you use the extension? – fs_tigre Dec 2 '18 at 23:24
  • 1
    check this stackoverflow.com/a/53547240/5820010 – Sh_Khan Dec 2 '18 at 23:26
  • 3
    There seems to be a move "away" from extension Notification.Name { and instead, define them with context of their use, UIApplication.willEnterForegroundNotification for example – MadProgrammer Dec 2 '18 at 23:50
  • @MadProgrammer this applies for custom notification names not what you mentioned – Sh_Khan Dec 3 '18 at 10:39
  • @Sh_Khan Not sure what you mean, but the core API seems to be moving away from Notification.Name extensions and placing them with the class context where they are used, why wouldn't you follow the core API convention? – MadProgrammer Dec 3 '18 at 10:50

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