-1

So I have a website, with the responsive css (Mobile oriented). CSS stylesheet has rules for the mobile version, then (in the end of the file) @media queries start for the screens wider, then mobile.

When a page is loaded on desktop (and if this page is not cached by the browser), mobile css loades first, then in less then a second, it switches to the desktop styles. So it blinks with mobile version css (considering the fact, that desktop is wider then mobile screen, it stretches huge elements through out the page), then looks fine.

I understand, that the browser needs to load the stylesheet completely, and before it did so, it shows what it has already loaded. I understand, that this behavior is explainable, but it still bugs me.

Is there a way to load the css without blinking with mobile version (but WITHOUT making it desktop oriented (so that the desktop css loaded first, and the rest was handled by the @media queries)) and should I even bother about it (or is it just fine and should remain that way)?

Here is some code:

Meta tags before CSS:

<meta charset="UTF-8"/>
<meta name="mobile-web-app-capable" content="yes">
<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1, minimum-scale=1, user-scalable=no, minimal-ui">
<link rel="apple-touch-icon" href="images/icn.png" />
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="images/icn.png" type="image/x-icon" />

Invoking CSS from an HTML file:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="styles/page1.css">

CSS File example (shortened (this is just an example of the structure of CSS in the file)):

html {
    margin:0;
    height:100%;
    padding:0;
}
body {
    height:100%;
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
    font-size:16px;
}
.first-panel {
    background: black;
    width:250px;
    height:100vh;
    color:white;
    position:fixed;
    left:0;
    clear:both;
    top:0
}
.no-user-select {
    -webkit-user-select:none;
    -moz-user-select:none;
    -ms-user-select:none;
    user-select:none
}
@media only screen and (min-width:480px) {
}
@media only screen and (min-width:640px) {
}
@media only screen and (min-width:768px) {  
}
@media only screen and (min-width:1024px) {
    .first-panel {
        background: white;
        color:black;
    }
}
@media only screen and (min-width:1280px) {
}
  • Show us how you load your CSS. – Daut Dec 3 '18 at 9:29
  • Move everything to single CSS file and load it in <head>. – Justinas Dec 3 '18 at 9:30
  • @Daut CSS files? With html stylesheet tags. <link rel="stylesheet" href="styles/page1.css"> – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 9:31
  • @Justinas all of the rules are in a single file and are loaded in <head> – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 9:32
  • @Mee Based on what you say - that is not really possible. There is something that we cannot just guess. Share some code/ – Daut Dec 3 '18 at 9:37
0

There are few approach you can use

1st Approach by using CSS File

<link rel="stylesheet" media="screen and (min-width: 600px)" href="small.css">
<link rel="stylesheet" media="screen and (min-width: 4000px)" href="big.css">

2nd by using Javascript

if (window.matchMedia('screen and (min-width: 600px)')){
  document.write('<link rel="stylesheet" 
                  href="small.css">');
}

I suggest for better one you need use only one css file and define the concept like as below :

@media (min-width:320px)  { /* smartphones, portrait iPhone, portrait 480x320 phones (Android) */ }
@media (min-width:480px)  { /* smartphones, Android phones, landscape iPhone */ }
@media (min-width:600px)  { /* portrait tablets, portrait iPad, e-readers (Nook/Kindle), landscape 800x480 phones (Android) */ }
@media (min-width:801px)  { /* tablet, landscape iPad, lo-res laptops ands desktops */ }
@media (min-width:1025px) { /* big landscape tablets, laptops, and desktops */ }
@media (min-width:1281px) { /* hi-res laptops and desktops */ }
| improve this answer | |
  • I have posted some code, that I have used. Wouldnt the first approach give the same result as I have? Also what is the difference between how I have handled the queries and your suggestion. P. S. I think JS will load CSS even slower. Also, what do you think about the code, that I have just posted. Thank you for your answer. – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 9:52
  • better you can use min and max both like this @media only screen and (min-width:640px) and (max-width:767px) {} which will target the same screen size – SantoshK Dec 3 '18 at 10:18
  • That has been suggested by J. Sadi. I have tried it, and it forces to add !important after each style inside the query-selector. Adding this word is usually a bad approach + I have a LOT of rules in CSS, so using this word all the time is not a good option. – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 10:34
  • Ok, so I have decided, that the best approach for optimizing this css would be to divide this big stylesheet into smaller ones and request them with media queries in html (approach 1, as described by SantoshK). This would require coping all of the global rules through out those small files, but with changes from the queries. – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 15:40
  • I only not sure, will the browser load so much data or just the file it needs for this kind of screen. If it will load all of the data, then I'll have to set up some system to determine the width of the screen with php (by header information or JS Ajax or smth) and then php should decide, which css file to send – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 15:55
0

Adding "max-width" to your media-selector should do the trick:

@media only screen and (min-width:480px) and (max-width: 639px) {
}
@media only screen and (min-width:640px) and (max-width: 767px) {
}
@media only screen and (min-width:768px) and (max-width: 1024px) {  
}
@media only screen and (min-width:1024px) and (max-width: 1279px) {
    .first-panel {
        background: white;
        color:black;
    }
}
@media only screen and (min-width:1280px) {
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Thanks, I'll try that. If it helps, will mark as correct – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 10:06
  • Note that if you're setting styles of a class outside of a media-selector, too. you maybe have to override it inside the media-selector using !important; – J. Sadi Dec 3 '18 at 10:10
  • I have tried this, and it does not work without adding !important inside a media-selector (as you have specified in your comment). I have way too much styles to use !important all the time. Also using this word is a bad approach and should be avoided if possible. It is only for "emergency", so to say, situations. – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 10:31
  • in this case you've set your styles the wrong way. Then you should not set the styles outside the media-selectors. These are the two options you have: you could set styles "globally" and override it inside media-selectors, OR you could set these styles using the media-selector only. – J. Sadi Dec 3 '18 at 11:39
  • well, in this case, the styles will not be preserved. What I mean is: the .first-panel has a set of rules to it, while one of the media queries overwrites only two of them (background and color). If the those styles wont load (if I put the global rules into a media tag), then the page would be displayed incorrectly – Mee Dec 3 '18 at 15:05

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.