51

When I do the following.. anything done to Person b modifies Person a (I thought doing this would clone Person b from Person a). I also have NO idea if changing Person a will change Person b after the linking. Due to my code right now, I can only see this in 1 direction.

Person a = new Person() { head = "big", feet = "small" };
Person b = a; 

b.head = "small"; //now a.head = "small" too   

Now if I do this instead.. Person a becomes completely separate.

Person b = new Person() { head = a.head, feet = a.feet };

Now this fine and kinda makes sense when comparing this behaviour to other things in C#. BUT, this could get very annoying with large objects.

Is there a way to shortcut this at all?

Such as:

Person b = a.Values;

  • Can you give an example of what you're trying to accomplish with this? This isn't the sort of thing that's needed frequently. Maybe there's another way to accomplish your task. – John Saunders Mar 19 '11 at 1:17
  • It is called "deep copy", search for this. Your example is a very good one for why you rarely actually do this. The odds that one person would have the exact same traits as another one are quite rare. – Hans Passant Mar 19 '11 at 1:18
  • Note that the word "linking" is not used for what you're doing there. This is an assignment. The question header implies that the question has something to do with the linker. – steinar Mar 19 '11 at 1:22
  • Sorry about the terminology, I don't know how to properly define everything yet. I'm basically storing a bunch of settings in a object. Then another object takes those settings and builds itself from them. Unfortunately (for me right now), building the second object changes the first object because of this behavior. Maybe I shouldn't be storing my settings in an object, but I don't know how else to do it because of how complex it is. – PiZzL3 Mar 19 '11 at 1:30
  • This isn't a link at all. They're the same object. You've got two references to the same object. – John Saunders Mar 19 '11 at 1:30

12 Answers 12

42

Is there a way to shortcut this at all?

No, not really. You'll need to make a new instance in order to avoid the original from affecting the "copy". There are a couple of options for this:

  1. If your type is a struct, not a class, it will be copied by value (instead of just copying the reference to the instance). This will give it the semantics you're describing, but has many other side effects that tend to be less than desirable, and is not recommended for any mutable type (which this obviously is, or this wouldn't be an issue!)

  2. Implement a "cloning" mechanism on your types. This can be ICloneable or even just a constructor that takes an instance and copies values from it.

  3. Use reflection, MemberwiseClone, or similar to copy all values across, so you don't have to write the code to do this. This has potential problems, especially if you have fields containing non-simple types.

  • 2
    Implementing ICloneable is not recommended. There is no generic version of it. The clone will not have the type of the original, but will be of type object. Also readonly fields cannot be written to from a Clone method. It is better to write a constructor taking the original as parameter. – Peter Huber Apr 30 '16 at 7:59
  • @PeterHuber you are correct with regard to implementing ICloneable but that does mean that the OP cannot create a Clone method (WITHOUT implementing ICloneable) and make the method return a strongly typed copy of itself instead of an "object". Regardless, it seems like additional work the OP is hoping to avoid. – Andrew Steitz Dec 20 '16 at 17:19
  • 2
    @AndrewSteitz: Indeed, it is perfectly fine just to write a Clone() method returning a Person. I just feel that it is nicer using 'Person clonedPerson = new Person(originalPerson);'. It makes quite clear that a new object of class Person gets returned, while 'originalPerson.Clone()' could return originalPerson. Of course, this doesn't make much sense, but the constructor guarantees that a new object gets returned. – Peter Huber Dec 21 '16 at 10:23
63

What you are looking is for a Cloning. You will need to Implement IClonable and then do the Cloning.

Example:

class Person() : ICloneable
{
    public string head;
    public string feet; 

    #region ICloneable Members

    public object Clone()
    {
        return this.MemberwiseClone();
    }

    #endregion
}

Then You can simply call the Clone method to do a ShallowCopy (In this particular Case also a DeepCopy)

Person a = new Person() { head = "big", feet = "small" };
Person b = (Person) a.Clone();  

You can use the MemberwiseClone method of the Object class to do the cloning.

  • 5
    Do not use IClonable: blogs.msdn.com/b/brada/archive/2003/04/09/49935.aspx – Robert Levy Mar 19 '11 at 1:26
  • 4
    @Robert Levy: I know the difference arise between Shallow Copy and Deep Copy, when you have Reference type of members in the class. – Shekhar_Pro Mar 19 '11 at 1:32
  • 3
    @RobertLevy That link makes no coherent point, except that somebody was frustrated on the internet, long ago. – jpaugh Sep 24 '16 at 16:26
  • 1
    @jpaugh it was easier to read 5 years ago before the formatting of the blog broke but it's basically a post from the dude at Microsoft who wrote the framework design guidelines issuing a guideline that IClonable should not be used because it's contract is ambiguous – Robert Levy Sep 24 '16 at 23:01
  • @RobertLevy Thanks for explaining! I came across another MSDN blog post which I think says the same thing: blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/brada/2004/05/03/… – jpaugh Sep 25 '16 at 1:55
14

Since the MemberwiseClone() method is not public, I created this simple extension method in order to make it easier to clone objects:

public static T Clone<T>(this T obj)
{
    var inst = obj.GetType().GetMethod("MemberwiseClone", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic);

    return (T)inst?.Invoke(obj, null);
}

Usage:

var clone = myObject.Clone();
14

I use AutoMapper for this. It works like this:

Mapper.CreateMap(typeof(Person), typeof(Person));
Mapper.Map(a, b);

Now person a has all the properties of person b.

As an aside, AutoMapper works for differing objects as well. For more information, check it out at http://automapper.org

Update: I use this syntax now (simplistically - really the CreateMaps are in AutoMapper profiles):

Mapper.CreateMap<Person, Person>;
Mapper.Map(a, b);

Note that you don't have to do a CreateMap to map one object of the same type to another, but if you don't, AutoMapper will create a shallow copy, meaning to the lay man that if you change one object, the other changes also.

  • Thanks, this works perfect! We already used Mappers in our solution anyway, and this is a better solution than the JSON serialize and deserialize I've also seen, since you are then forced to have a serialized object and it also doesn't work for lists of objects inside it. This is a much better and cleaner solution and it works like a charm. – Kevin Cruijssen Mar 4 '15 at 12:01
  • if your project is already using automapper, this is imho the way to go. – Souhaieb Besbes Jan 15 '16 at 15:56
8

To clone your class object you can use the Object.MemberwiseClone method,

just add this function to your class :

public class yourClass
{
    // ...
    // ...

    public yourClass DeepCopy()
    {
        yourClass othercopy = (yourClass)this.MemberwiseClone();
        return othercopy;
    }
}

then to perform a deep independant copy, just call the DeepCopy method :

yourClass newLine = oldLine.DeepCopy();
6

a and b are just two references to the same Person object. They both essentially hold the address of the Person.

There is a ICloneable interface, though relatively few classes support it. With this, you would write:

Person b = a.Clone();

Then, b would be an entirely separate Person.

You could also implement a copy constructor:

public Person(Person src)
{
  // ... 
}

There is no built-in way to copy all the fields. You can do it through reflection, but there would be a performance penalty.

2

Painlessly: Using NClone library

Person a = new Person() { head = "big", feet = "small" };
Person b = Clone.ObjectGraph(a); 
  • 3
    But installing a new library causes a bit of pain, doesn't it? – tocqueville Mar 28 '17 at 18:30
1
  public static T Clone<T>(T obj)
  {
      DataContractSerializer dcSer = new  DataContractSerializer(obj.GetType());
      MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream();

      dcSer.WriteObject(memoryStream, obj);
      memoryStream.Position = 0;

      T newObject = (T)dcSer.ReadObject(memoryStream);
      return newObject;
  }
  • I upvoted because this absolutely DOES what the OP is asking for but serializing/deserializing are very "expensive" operations so anyone reading this, please keep in mind how often you are going to need to perform this. – Andrew Steitz Dec 20 '16 at 17:24
0

You could do it like this:

var jss = new JavaScriptSerializer();
var b = jss.Deserialize<Person>(jss.Serialize(a));

For deep cloning you may want to take a look at this answer: https://stackoverflow.com/a/78612/550975

  • You are right, you could but if you do you'd take on a dependency to System.Web.Script.Serialization which may or may not be a bad thing depending on your project type. – rism Aug 15 '14 at 4:01
0

MemberwiseClone is a good way to do a shallow copy as others have suggested. It is protected however, so if you want to use it without changing the class, you have to access it via reflection. Reflection however is slow. So if you are planning to clone a lot of objects it might be worthwhile to cache the result:

public static class CloneUtil<T>
{
    private static readonly Func<T, object> clone;

    static CloneUtil()
    {
        var cloneMethod = typeof(T).GetMethod("MemberwiseClone", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic);
        clone = (Func<T, object>)cloneMethod.CreateDelegate(typeof(Func<T, object>));
    }

    public static T ShallowClone(T obj) => (T)clone(obj);
}

public static class CloneUtil
{
    public static T ShallowClone<T>(this T obj) => CloneUtil<T>.ShallowClone(obj);
}

You can call it like this:

Person b = a.ShallowClone();
0

In my opinion, the best way to do this is by implementing your own Clone() method as shown below.

class Person
{
    public string head;
    public string feet;

    // Downside: It has to be manually implemented for every class
    public Person Clone()
    {
        return new Person() { head = this.head, feet = this.feet };
    }
}

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Person a = new Person() { head = "bigAF", feet = "smol" };
        Person b = a.Clone();

        b.head = "notEvenThatBigTBH";

        Console.WriteLine($"{a.head}, {a.feet}");
        Console.WriteLine($"{b.head}, {b.feet}");
    }
}

Output:

bigAf, smol

notEvenThatBigTBH, smol

b is totally independent to a, due to it not being a reference, but a clone.

Hope I could help!

-2

This happens because "Person" is a class, so it is passed by reference. In the statement "b = a" you are just copying a reference to the one and only "Person" instance that you created with the keyword new.

The easiest way to have the behavior that you are looking for is to use a "value type".

Just change the Person declaration from

class Person

to

struct Person
  • This just makes it harder to have a class. 'Cannot have instance initalizers in structs' – Bonzo Oct 6 '12 at 18:34

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