9

I need to get the top N items from a Vec which is quite large in production. Currently I do it like this inefficient way:

let mut v = vec![6, 4, 3, 7, 2, 1, 5];
v.sort_unstable();
v = v[0..3].to_vec();

In C++, I'd use std::partial_sort, but I can't find an equivalent in the Rust docs.

Am I just overlooking it, or does it not exist (yet)?

4
  • 3
    The standard library does not offer such functionality. Maybe a crate can solve your problem or BinaryHeap which is always sorted?
    – hellow
    Dec 3, 2018 at 14:26
  • 3
    Using BinaryHeap from the standard library, it is pretty easy to implement this yourself. Basically, if you want to find the k smallest values from your vector, start by creating a heap from the first k values in your vector. Then iterate over the rest of the vector, and in each step add the current element to the heap and then remove the greatest element from the heap using pop(). Once you reached the end of the heap, use the into_sorted_vec() method to get the k smallest elements in sorted order. Dec 3, 2018 at 15:36
  • 1
    @hellow I wouldn't call a binary heap "always sorted". Dec 3, 2018 at 15:37
  • 1
    You could also keep track of the N biggest elements while populating the vector; it should be pretty simple as long as the populating code is contained in a single spot. You could also consider crafting a custom object containing the vector and a list of N biggest elements that automatically updates that list when it's populated (using a custom method).
    – ljedrz
    Dec 3, 2018 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

7

The standard library doesn't contain this functionality, but it looks like the lazysort crate is exactly what you need:

So what's the point of lazy sorting? As per the linked blog post, they're useful when you do not need or intend to need every value; for example you may only need the first 1,000 ordered values from a larger set.

#![feature(test)]

extern crate lazysort;
extern crate rand;
extern crate test;

use std::cmp::Ordering;

trait SortLazy<T> {
    fn sort_lazy<F>(&mut self, cmp: F, n: usize)
    where
        F: Fn(&T, &T) -> Ordering;
    unsafe fn sort_lazy_fast<F>(&mut self, cmp: F, n: usize)
    where
        F: Fn(&T, &T) -> Ordering;
}

impl<T> SortLazy<T> for [T] {
    fn sort_lazy<F>(&mut self, cmp: F, n: usize)
    where
        F: Fn(&T, &T) -> Ordering,
    {
        fn sort_lazy<F, T>(data: &mut [T], accu: &mut usize, cmp: &F, n: usize)
        where
            F: Fn(&T, &T) -> Ordering,
        {
            if !data.is_empty() && *accu < n {
                let mut pivot = 1;
                let mut lower = 0;
                let mut upper = data.len();
                while pivot < upper {
                    match cmp(&data[pivot], &data[lower]) {
                        Ordering::Less => {
                            data.swap(pivot, lower);
                            lower += 1;
                            pivot += 1;
                        }
                        Ordering::Greater => {
                            upper -= 1;
                            data.swap(pivot, upper);
                        }
                        Ordering::Equal => pivot += 1,
                    }
                }
                sort_lazy(&mut data[..lower], accu, cmp, n);
                sort_lazy(&mut data[upper..], accu, cmp, n);
            } else {
                *accu += 1;
            }
        }
        sort_lazy(self, &mut 0, &cmp, n);
    }

    unsafe fn sort_lazy_fast<F>(&mut self, cmp: F, n: usize)
    where
        F: Fn(&T, &T) -> Ordering,
    {
        fn sort_lazy<F, T>(data: &mut [T], accu: &mut usize, cmp: &F, n: usize)
        where
            F: Fn(&T, &T) -> Ordering,
        {
            if !data.is_empty() && *accu < n {
                unsafe {
                    use std::mem::swap;
                    let mut pivot = 1;
                    let mut lower = 0;
                    let mut upper = data.len();
                    while pivot < upper {
                        match cmp(data.get_unchecked(pivot), data.get_unchecked(lower)) {
                            Ordering::Less => {
                                swap(
                                    &mut *(data.get_unchecked_mut(pivot) as *mut T),
                                    &mut *(data.get_unchecked_mut(lower) as *mut T),
                                );
                                lower += 1;
                                pivot += 1;
                            }
                            Ordering::Greater => {
                                upper -= 1;
                                swap(
                                    &mut *(data.get_unchecked_mut(pivot) as *mut T),
                                    &mut *(data.get_unchecked_mut(upper) as *mut T),
                                );
                            }
                            Ordering::Equal => pivot += 1,
                        }
                    }
                    sort_lazy(&mut data[..lower], accu, cmp, n);
                    sort_lazy(&mut data[upper..], accu, cmp, n);
                }
            } else {
                *accu += 1;
            }
        }
        sort_lazy(self, &mut 0, &cmp, n);
    }
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use test::Bencher;

    use lazysort::Sorted;
    use std::collections::BinaryHeap;
    use SortLazy;

    use rand::{thread_rng, Rng};

    const SIZE_VEC: usize = 100_000;
    const N: usize = 42;

    #[bench]
    fn sort(b: &mut Bencher) {
        b.iter(|| {
            let mut rng = thread_rng();
            let mut v: Vec<i32> = std::iter::repeat_with(|| rng.gen())
                .take(SIZE_VEC)
                .collect();
            v.sort_unstable();
        })
    }

    #[bench]
    fn lazysort(b: &mut Bencher) {
        b.iter(|| {
            let mut rng = thread_rng();
            let v: Vec<i32> = std::iter::repeat_with(|| rng.gen())
                .take(SIZE_VEC)
                .collect();
            let _: Vec<_> = v.iter().sorted().take(N).collect();
        })
    }

    #[bench]
    fn lazysort_in_place(b: &mut Bencher) {
        b.iter(|| {
            let mut rng = thread_rng();
            let mut v: Vec<i32> = std::iter::repeat_with(|| rng.gen())
                .take(SIZE_VEC)
                .collect();
            v.sort_lazy(i32::cmp, N);
        })
    }

    #[bench]
    fn lazysort_in_place_fast(b: &mut Bencher) {
        b.iter(|| {
            let mut rng = thread_rng();
            let mut v: Vec<i32> = std::iter::repeat_with(|| rng.gen())
                .take(SIZE_VEC)
                .collect();
            unsafe { v.sort_lazy_fast(i32::cmp, N) };
        })
    }

    #[bench]
    fn binaryheap(b: &mut Bencher) {
        b.iter(|| {
            let mut rng = thread_rng();
            let v: Vec<i32> = std::iter::repeat_with(|| rng.gen())
                .take(SIZE_VEC)
                .collect();

            let mut iter = v.iter();
            let mut heap: BinaryHeap<_> = iter.by_ref().take(N).collect();
            for i in iter {
                heap.push(i);
                heap.pop();
            }
            let _ = heap.into_sorted_vec();
        })
    }
}
running 5 tests
test tests::binaryheap             ... bench:   3,283,938 ns/iter (+/- 413,805)
test tests::lazysort               ... bench:   1,669,229 ns/iter (+/- 505,528)
test tests::lazysort_in_place      ... bench:   1,781,007 ns/iter (+/- 443,472)
test tests::lazysort_in_place_fast ... bench:   1,652,103 ns/iter (+/- 691,847)
test tests::sort                   ... bench:   5,600,513 ns/iter (+/- 711,927)

test result: ok. 0 passed; 0 failed; 0 ignored; 5 measured; 0 filtered out

This code allows us to see that lazysort is faster than the solution with BinaryHeap. We can also see that BinaryHeap solution gets worse when N increases.

The problem with lazysort is that it creates a second Vec<_>. A "better" solution would be to implement the partial sort in-place. I provided an example of such an implementation.

Keep in mind that all these solutions come with overhead. When N is about SIZE_VEC / 3, the classic sort wins.

You could submit an RFC/issue to ask about adding this feature to the standard library.

2
  • It looks like the crate might actually have the partially-sorted vector internally; I wonder if it would be "trivial" to expose that directly.
    – Shepmaster
    Dec 3, 2018 at 17:06
  • @Shepmaster Yes, it is trivial but lazysort use a stack to save its state, it's not necessary when you don't use an iterator.
    – Stargateur
    Dec 3, 2018 at 20:19
2

There is a select_nth_unstable, the equivalent of std::nth_element. The result of this can then be sorted to achieve what you want.

Example:

let mut v = vec![6, 4, 3, 7, 2, 1, 5];
let top_three = v.select_nth_unstable(3).0;
top_three.sort();

3 here is the index of the "nth" element, so we're actually picking the 4th element, that's because select_nth_unstable returns a tuple of

  • a slice to the left of the nth element
  • a reference to the nth element
  • a slice to the right of the nth element

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