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I'm having some issues with how my functions flow in lambda. I'm trying to grab value stored in S3, increment it, and put it back. However, my program doesn't flow how I feel it should be. I'm using async waterfall to run the flow of my functions.

Here's my code:

let AWS = require('aws-sdk');
let async = require('async');

let bucket = "MY_BUCKET";
let key = "MY_FILE.txt";

exports.handler = async (event) => {
    let s3 = new AWS.S3();
    async.waterfall([
        download,
        increment,
        upload
        ], function (err) {
            if (err) {
                console.error(err);
            } else {
                console.log("Increment successful");
            }

            console.log("test4");
            return null;
        }
    );
    console.log("test5");

    function download(next) {
        console.log("test");
        s3.getObject({
            Bucket: bucket,
            Key: key
        },
        next);
    }
    function increment(response, next) {
        console.log("test2");
        console.log(response.Body);
        let newID = parseInt(response.Body, 10) + 1;
        next(response.ContentType, newID);
    }
    function upload(contentType, data, next) {
        console.log("test3");
        s3.putObject({
            Bucket: bucket,
            Key: key,
            Body: data,
            ContentType: contentType
        },
        next);
    }
};

I'm only getting test and test5 on my log. I was under the impression that after the download function, increment should run if it was okay or the callback function at the end of the waterfall should run if there was an error. The program doesn't give an error on execution and it doesn't appear to go to either function.

Could someone guide me to what I'm missing in my understanding?

EDIT: So it seems my issue was related to my function declaration. The default template declared it as async(event). I thought this was odd as usually they are declared as (event, context, callback). Switching to the later (or even just (event) without the async) fixed this. It looks like my issue is with calling the function as asynchronous. This blocked the waterfall async calls?? Can anyone elaborate on this?

  • Are you sure the bucket exits? The file exits? Do you have permission to access the bucket? – Gary Holiday Dec 3 '18 at 20:40
  • You're missing some code here, the actual lambda handler function is missing. That function should be passing in a callback argument, which you need to call in the waterfall callback rather than returning null. Can we see the full example? – justin.m.chase Dec 4 '18 at 2:19
  • @justin.m.chase I've just edited to add the full function. I have it running in the handler. I could very well not understand how exactly lambda runs the code though – Alex DeCamillo Dec 5 '18 at 15:02
2

Your problem is that your handler is declared as an async function, which will create a promise for you automatically, but since you are not awaiting at all your function is essentially ending synchronously.

There are a couple of ways to solve this, all of which we'll go over.

  1. Do not use promises, use callbacks as the async library is designed to use.
  2. Do not use the async library or callbacks and instead use async/await.
  3. Mix both together and make your own promise and resolve/reject it manually.

1. Do not use promises

In this solution, you would remove the async keyword and add the callback parameter lambda is passing to you. Simply calling it will end the lambda, passing it an error will signal that the function failed.

// Include the callback parameter ────┐
exports.handler = (event, context, callback) => {
    const params =[
      download,
      increment,
      upload
    ]
    async.waterfall(params, (err) => {
      // To end the lambda call the callback here ──────┐
      if (err) return callback(err);  //   error case ──┤
      callback({ ok: true });         // success case ──┘
    });
};

2. Use async/await

The idea here is to not use callback style but to instead use the Promise based async/await keywords. If you return a promise lambda will use that promise to handle lambda completion instead of the callback.

If you have a function with the async keyword it will automatically return a promise that is transparent to your code.

To do this we need to modify your code to no longer use the async library and to make your other functions async as well.

const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
const s3 = new AWS.S3();
const Bucket = "MY_BUCKET";
const Key = "MY_FILE.txt";

async function download() {
  const params = {
    Bucket,
    Key
  }
  return s3.getObject(params).promise(); // You can await or return a promise
}

function increment(response) {
  // This function is synchronous, no need for promises or callbacks
  const { ContentType: contentType, Body } = response;
  const newId = parseInt(Body, 10) + 1;
  return { contentType, newId };
}

async function upload({ contentType: ContentType, newId: Body }) {
  const params = {
    Bucket,
    Key,
    Body,
    ContentType
  };
  return s3.putObject(params).promise();
}

exports.handler = async (event) => {
    const obj = await download(); // await the promise completion
    const data = increment(obj);  // call synchronously without await
    await upload(data)

    // The handlers promise will be resolved after the above are
    // all completed, the return result will be the lambdas return value.
    return { ok: true };
};

3. Mix promises and callbacks

In this approach we are still using the async library which is callback based but our outer function is promised based. This is fine but in this scenario we need to make our own promise manually and resolve or reject it in the waterfall handler.

exports.handler = async (event) => {
  // In an async function you can either use one or more `await`'s or
  // return a promise, or both.
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    const steps = [
      download,
      increment,
      upload
    ];
    async.waterfall(steps, function (err) {
      // Instead of a callback we are calling resolve or reject
      // given to us by the promise we are running in.
      if (err) return reject(err);
      resolve({ ok: true });
    });
  });
};

Misc

In addition to the main problem of callbacks vs. promises you are encountering you have a few minor issues I noticed:

Misc 1

You should be using const rather than let most of the time. The only time you should use let is if you intend to reassign the variable, and most of the time you shouldn't do that. I would challenge you with ways to write code that never requires let, it will help improve your code in general.

Misc 2

You have an issue in one of your waterfall steps where you are returning response.ContentType as the first argument to next, this is a bug because it will interpret that as an error. The signature for the callback is next(err, result) so you should be doing this in your increment and upload functions:

function increment(response, next) {
  const { ContentType: contentType, Body: body } = response;
  const newId = parseInt(body, 10) + 1;
  next(null, { contentType, newId }); // pass null for err
}
function upload(result, next) {
  const { contentType, newId } = result;
  s3.putObject({
      Bucket: bucket,
      Key: key,
      Body: newId,
      ContentType: contentType
  },
  next);
}

If you don't pass null or undefined for err when calling next async will interpret that as an error and will skip the rest of the waterfall and go right to the completion handler passing in that error.

Misc 3

What you need to know about context.callbackWaitsForEmptyEventLoop is that even if you complete the function correctly, in one of the ways discussed above your lambda may still hang open and eventually timeout rather than successfully complete. Based on your code sample here you won't need to worry about that probably but the reason why this can happen is if you happen to have something that isn't closed properly such as a persistent connection to a database or websocket or something like that. Setting this flag to false at the beginning of your lambda execution will cause the process to exit regardless of anything keeping the event loop alive, and will force them to close ungracefully.

In the case below your lambda can do the work successfully and even return a success result but it will hang open until it timesout and be reported as an error. It can even be re-invoked over and over depending on how it's triggered.

exports.handler = async (event) => {
  const db = await connect()
  await db.write(data)
  // await db.close() // Whoops forgot to close my connection!
  return { ok: true }
}

In that case simply calling db.close() would solve the issue but sometimes its not obvious what is hanging around in the event loop and you just need a sledge hammer type solution to close the lambda, which is what context.callbackWaitsForEmptyEventLoop = false is for!

exports.handler = async (event) => {
  context.callbackWaitsForEmptyEventLoop = false
  const db = await connect()
  await db.write(data)
  return { ok: true }
}

The above will complete the lambda as soon as the function returns, killing all connections or anything else living in the event loop still.

  • Thank you. This was very helpful in understanding how promises and async are used in lambda execution. – Alex DeCamillo Dec 10 '18 at 17:57
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Your function terminates before the waterfall is resolved. That is, the asynchronous calls aren't executed at all. That is why you don't see any of the console.log calls you have within the waterfall functions, and only see the one that is called synchronously immediately after the call to async.waterfall.

Not sure how well async.waterfall is supported by AWS Lambda, but since promises are natively supported and perform the same functionality (with fewer loc), you could use promises instead. Your code would look something like this:

module.exports.handler = (event,context) =>
    s3.getObject({
        Bucket: bucket,
        Key: key
    }).promise()
        .then(response => ({
            Body: parseInt(response.Body, 10) + 1,
            ContentType: response.contentType,
        }))
        .then(modifiedResponse => s3.putObject({
            Bucket: bucket,
            Key: key,
            Body: modifiedResponse.data,
            ContentType: modifiedResponse.contentType}).promise())
        .catch(err => console.error(err));
  • If you have the async keyword, then use await, don't use .then / .catch – justin.m.chase Dec 4 '18 at 2:17
  • Also, not using promises is definitely supported. They pass in a callback as an argument and you simply call that when you're done callback(err, result) to complete the function. – justin.m.chase Dec 4 '18 at 2:20
  • Never claimed that you cannot use callback. Your code can use a callback, or return a promise. The OP's code did not use a callback, but instead tried to use waterfall to essentially do the same thing that promises do, i.e. write asynchronous code that looks like synchronous code. – Kalev Dec 4 '18 at 19:05
  • You did however say "Not sure how well async.waterfall is supported by AWS Lambda", I was clarifying that it is fully supported, via the callback. The waterfall completion callback should then call the lambdas callback to successfully complete the lambda. – justin.m.chase Dec 4 '18 at 20:56
  • Seems, in this case, that the code inside the waterfall functions is never executed. Not entirely sure how calling the lambda callback in the waterfall completion callback would change that (as the waterfall completion callback is never called to begin with). I am not an expert on the topic, though, so I'm not contesting your claim. – Kalev Dec 4 '18 at 21:12

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