2

I'm on Day 3 of trying to learn Common Lisp (SBCL) by doing Advent of Code. I understand there is more than one type of return. I'm wondering if someone could explain to me why the following function will return nil (this makes sense)

(defun fn (n)
    (cond ((zerop n) 
           (return-from fn nil))
          (t  
           (write-line "Hello World") 
           (fn (- n 1)))))

but the following function will return "Hello World" (this does not make sense to me).

(defun fn (n)
    (cond ((zerop n) 
           (return-from fn nil))
          (t 
           (fn (- n 1)) 
           (write-line "Hello World"))))

I found a great post covering some aspects of SBCL's return behaviour here, but to my understanding it doesn't seem to address this particular detail.

EDIT: a loop call is a more sensible way of writing this function, but it is not the way that I discovered this behaviour. My suspicion is that this behaviour arises because fn is called recursively.

4

(I started writing this before Sylwester's answer, which is mostly better I think.)

A critical difference between Lisp-family languages and many other languages is that Lisp-family languages are 'expression languages'. What this means technically is that languages like (say) C or Python there are two sorts of constructs:

  • expressions, which have values;
  • statements, which do not;

While in Lisp-family languages there is one sort of thing: expressions, which have values. Lisp-family languages are sometimes called 'expression languages' as a result of this.

This makes a huge difference if you want to write functions, which are things which return values (a function call is an expression in other words).

Conventional languages (Python as an example)

In a language which is not an expression language then if you're defining a function and find yourself in the middle of some construct which is a statement and you want to return a value, you have to use some special magic construct, often called return to do that. So in Python, where conditionals are statements, you might write:

def fib(n):
    if n < 2:
        return n
    else:
        return fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2)

And in fact you have to use return because the body of a function definition in Python is a series of statements, so to return any kind of value at all you need to use return.

In fact, Python (and C, and Java &c &c) have a special form of a conditional which is an expression: in Python this looks like this:

def fib(n):
    return n if n < 2 else (fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2)

It looks different in C but it does the same thing.

But you still need this annoying return (OK, only one of them now) & that brings to light another feature of such languages: if some place in the syntax wants a statement you generally need to have a statement there, or if you can put an expression there its value just gets dropped. So you can try something like this:

def fib(n):
    n if n < 2 else (fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2)

And that's syntactically OK -- the expression gets turned into a statement -- but it fails at runtime because the function no longer returns a useful value. In Python you can get around this if you want people to hate you:

fib = lambda n: n if n < 2 else fib(n - 1) + fib(n - 2)

Python people will hate you if you do this, and it's also not useful, because Python's lambda only takes expressions so what you can write is crippled.

Lisp

Lisp has none of this: in Lisp everything is an expression and therefore everything has a value, you just need to know where it comes from. There is still return (in CL, anyway) but you need to use it much less often.

But, of course people often do want to write programs which look like 'do this, then do this, then do this', where most of the doing is being done for side-effect, so Lisps generally have some kind of sequencing construct, which lets you just have a bunch of expressions one after the other, all but (typically) one of which get evaluated for side-effect. In CL the most common sequencing construct is called progn (for historical reasons). (progn ...) is an expression made of other expressions, and its value is the value of last expression in its body.

progn is so useful in fact that a bunch of other constructs have 'implicit progns' in them. Two examples are function definitions (the body of defun is an implicit progn) and cond (the body of a cond-clause is an implicit `progn).

Your function

Here is your function (first version) with its various parts notated

(defun fn (n)
  ;; the body of fn is an implicit progn with one expression, so
  ;; do this and return its value
  (cond
   ;; the value of cond is the value of the selected clause, or nil
   ((zerop n)
    ;; the body of this cond clause is an implicit progn with on
    ;; expression so do this and ... it never returns
    (return-from fn nil))
   (t
    ;; the body of this cond clause is an implicit progn with two expressions, so
    ;; do this for side-effect
    (write-line "Hello World")
    ;; then do this and return its value
    (fn (- n 1)))))

Here is the second version

(defun fn (n)
  ;; the body of fn is an implicit progn with one expression, so
  ;; do this and return its value
  (cond
   ;; the value of cond is the value of the selected clause, or nil
   ((zerop n)
    ;; the body of this cond clause is an implicit progn with on
    ;; expression so do this and ... it never returns
    (return-from fn nil))
   (t
    ;; the body of this cond clause is an implicit progn with two expressions, so
    ;; do this for side-effect
    (fn (- n 1))
    ;; then do this and return its value
    (write-line "Hello World"))))

So you can see what is happening here: in the first version the value that gets returned is either nil or the value of the recursive call (also nil). In the second version the value that gets returned is either nil or whatever write-line returns. And it turns out that write-line returns the value of its argument, so that's what you get if you call it with an integer greater than zero.

Why have return-from at all in Lisp?

One thing that should be immediately clear from this whole expression-language thing is that you hardly ever need to explicitly return something in Lisp: you just have an expression that computes the value you want. But there are two good uses (which perhaps are really the same use) of explicit returns.

The first is that sometimes you are doing some big search for something in the form of a bunch of nested loops and at some point you just want to say 'OK, found it, here's the answer'. You can do that in one of two ways: you can carefully structure your loops so that once you find what you're after they all terminate nicely and the value gets passed back up, or you can just say 'here's the answer'. The latter thing is what return-from does: it just says 'I'm done now, unwind the stack carefully and return this':

(defun big-complicated-search (l m n)
  (dotimes (i l)
    (dotimes (j m)
      (dotimes (k n)
        (let ((it (something-involving i j k l m n)))
          (when (interesting-p it)
            (return-from big-complicated-search it)))))))

And return-from does this in the right way:

(defun big-complicated-file-search (file1 file2)
  (with-open-file (f1 file1)
    (with-open-file (f2 file2)
      ...
      (when ...
        (return-from big-complicated-search found)))))

When you call this, and when the thing is found, return-from will make sure that the two files you have opened are properly closed.

The second, which is really almost the same thing, is that sometimes you need to just give up, and return-from is a good way of doing this: it returns immediately, deals with clean-ups (see above) and is generally a nice way of saying 'OK, I give up now'. At first blush this seems like something you would do with some kind of exception-handling system, but in fact there are two critical differences:

  • in an exception-handling system (which CL has, of course), you need some kind of exception to raise so you might need to invent something;
  • exception-handling systems are dynamic not lexical: if you raise an exception then the thing that gets to handle it is hunted for up the stack dynamically: this means that you're at the mercy of anyone who stuck a handler in the way and it also typically rather slow.

Finally the exceptional-return-via-error-handling-mechanism is just, well, horrid.

2

Your code:

(defun fn (n)
  (cond ((zerop n) (return-from fn nil))
    (t (write-line "Hello World") (fn (- n 1)))
    )
  )

There is a bunch of things slightly wrong with above code:

(defun fn (n)
  (cond ((zerop n) (return-from fn nil))         ; 1) the return from is not needed
    (t (write-line "Hello World") (fn (- n 1)))  ; 2) this line is not correctly
                                                 ;    indented
    )                                            ; 3) dangling parentheses Don't. Never.
                                                 ;    also: incorrect indentation 
  )
  1. the first cond clause already returns a value, just write nil as the return value. Then the whole cond returns this value. It is very rare that you need return or return-from from a cond clause.
  2. use an editor to indent your code. In GNU Emacs / SLIME the command control-meta-q will indent the expression. For help about the editor commands in the current mode see: control-h m for mode help.
  3. indent correctly and don't use dangling parentheses. They are useless in Lisp. Learn to use the editor to correctly indent code - that's much more useful than to place wrongly indented parentheses on their own line. tab indents the current line.

It's more useful to format the code like this for a beginner:

(defun fn (n)
  (cond ((zerop n)
         (return-from fn nil))
        (t
         (write-line "Hello World")
         (fn (- n 1)))))

Code then will look more like a prefix tree.

Also don't forget to disable inserting tabs in GNU Emacs Put this into your emacs init file: (setq-default indent-tabs-mode nil). You can evaluate Emacs Lisp expressions also on the fly with meta>-:.

Now according to 1. above code is usually written as:

(defun fn (n)
  (cond ((zerop n)
         nil)
        (t
         (write-line "Hello World")
         (fn (- n 1)))))

When n is zero, the first clause is selected and its last value is returned. The other clauses are not looked at -> cond returns nil -> the function fn returns nil.

Usually I would write above recursive function like this:

(defun fn (n)
  (unless (zerop n)
    (write-line "Hello World")
    (fn (- n 1))))

unless returns nil if (zerop n) is true. Another variant:

(defun fn (n)
  (when (plusp n)
    (write-line "Hello World")
    (fn (- n 1))))

You CAN use return-from, but in case it was not clear: you don't need it most of the time.

  • actually, my (entirely default) slime set-up is causing this bizarre indentation behaviour. – bashfuloctopus Dec 3 '18 at 21:36
  • @bashfuloctopus: that's why I mentioned to get rid of the tabs and SLIME will do the right thing. It makes it easier to post code here... – Rainer Joswig Dec 3 '18 at 21:37
  • Unfortunately (setq-default indent-tabs-mode nil) has no effect. There must be some other default floating around that's responsible for correct indentation behaviour, or this option is clashing with some other option somewhere. – bashfuloctopus Dec 3 '18 at 21:51
  • 1
    @bashfuloctopus put it into ~/.emacs and restart emacs. Then start slime, edit a new file and indent code. There should be no tabs. If your old file already has tabs untabify it: select the whole buffer and call m-x untabify -> then you can save the file etc. – Rainer Joswig Dec 3 '18 at 21:56
  • I am still not sure what effect this should have, as it still seems to have no effect on my machine. The code indents just as before, and still leaves parentheses at weird and aesthetically unpleasing indentation levels. – bashfuloctopus Dec 3 '18 at 22:09
2

Unlike C language family Lisp has the feature that everything is expressions. That means you "return" the result of an expression. eg.

(+ (if (< x 0) 
       (- x) 
       x) 
    3)

Here the result of the if is that it will be the absolute value of x. Thus if x is -5 or 5 the result of the expression is 8. You can write abs like this:

(defun my-abs (v)
  (if (< v 0)
      (- v)
      v))

Notice I do not use return. THe result of the if is the last expression and that means the result of that is the result of my-abs.

Your two functions can be written like this:

(defun fn1 (n)
  (cond 
    ((zerop n) nil)
    (t (write-line "Hello World") (fn1 (- n 1)))))

And

(defun fn2 (n)
  (cond 
    ((zerop n) nil)
    (t (fn2 (- n 1)) (write-line "Hello World"))))

Needless to say (write-line "Hello World") returns its argument in addition to print the argument. Thus whenever it is the last expression it will be the result. For every n above 0 it will do the recursions first and each end every one except the first will return "Hello World". If you call (fn2 0) the result is nil, the same as fn1.

EDIT

One might ask what is the purpose of return and return-from when there obviously is little use for it. If you want something else than the default result in a loop macro the common way to do it by finally clause.

(defun split-by (test list &key (return-form #'values))
  "Split a list in two groups based on test"
  (loop :for e :in list
        :if (funcall test e) 
          :collect e :into alist
        :else 
          :collect e :into blist
        :finally (return (funcall return-form alist blist))))

(split-by #'oddp '(1 2 3 4) :return-form #'list)
; ==> ((1 3) (2 4))

Another way is if you are doing recursion and want to cancel everything when you know the result you can use return-from:

(defun find-tree-p (needle haystack &key (test #'eql))
  "search the tree for element using :test as comparison"      
  (labels ((helper (tree)
             (cond ((funcall test tree needle) 
                    (return-from find-tree t))
                   ((consp tree) 
                    (helper (car tree)) 
                    (helper (cdr tree)))
                   (t nil))))
   (helper haystack)))


(find-tree '(f g) '(a b c (d e (f g) q) 1 2 3) :test #'equal)
; ==> (f g) ; t

Now if you hadn't done return-from you would have had logic to check the returned value to see if you needed to continue or not. If you want to process elements and don't want to pass twice to check validity before computing the result, you can just start computing and use return-from as a call/cc. This function can be used to map over lists of lists and it stops at the shortest list so needs to become () when the first sublist is empty:

(defun cdrs (lists)
  "return the cdrs if all elements are cons, () otherwise"      
  (loop :for list :in lists
        :when (null list) :do (return-from cdrs '())
        :collect (cdr list)))

(cdrs '((a) (b) (c))) ; ==> (nil nil nil)
(cdrs '((a) (b) ()))  ; ==> ()
  • 1
    When is it necessary to use return or return-from? If every expression returns a value, this makes it seem to me as though return is typically unnecessary (but perhaps maybe for breaking out of a loop or something?) – bashfuloctopus Dec 3 '18 at 19:48
  • @bashfuloctopus Not often, but I've added som examples. – Sylwester Dec 4 '18 at 13:26

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