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Scenario: I am trying to build a function for a date check. The inputs for the function are: year, month and a holiday list (just a list of days). The function will check if the input_date is in the holiday list, if it is, it will sum one day to the input_date. Next it will check which weekday that is: if a Saturday (sum 2), if a Sunday (sum 1).

Issue: My problem is that if I just create a couple of if clauses to check for these criteria, the new date after the weekend check might also be on the holiday list, so the process should be repeated until I find a weekday that is not on the holidays list.

Question: Is there a way to encompass these checks in a loop?

Code so far:

def datecheck (input_year, input_month, holiday_list):      
    datetime.inputdate =  date(year, month, 1) 

        # this checks if inputdate is a holiday   
        if inputdate is in holiday_list: 
            inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=1)

        # next part guarantees inputdate is a weekday
        if inputdate.weekday() == 5: 
            inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=2)
        else if inputdate.weekday() == 6:
            inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=1)

        #check again for holiday?

        outputdate = inputdate
    return outputdate
2

A while loop will do the trick:

    # this checks if inputdate is a holiday   
    while inputdate in holiday_list: 
        inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=1)

It will keep running the code until the expression (if inputdate is in holiday_list) evaluates to false.

Example of adding the rest of the logic into the loop:

def datecheck (input_year, input_month, holiday_list):      
    inputdate =  date(input_year, input_month, 1) 

    valid = False

    while not valid:
        # this checks if inputdate is a holiday   
        if inputdate is in holiday_list: 
            inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=1)

        # next part guarantees inputdate is a weekday
        elif inputdate.weekday() == 5: 
            inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=2)

        elif inputdate.weekday() == 6:
            inputdate == inputdate + datetime.timedelta(days=1)

        else:
            valid = True

    return inputdate

I cleaned a couple other things up as well:

  • else if should be elif, and is in should just be in
  • outputdate was not needed once the loop was in place, since inputdate will have the correct value once the loop is finished
  • datetime.inputdate should just be inputdate I assume? datetime is the name of a module in the standard library but it doesn't have an inputdate attribute
  • The first if statement and onward is too far indented
  • I also put the correct argument names into date() but just so you are aware, you will need something like from datetime import date above this code so that date is recognised.
  • Thanks for the answer. In this case, could I also add the weekday checks inside this loop? Because after the weekday check, I would need to check again if it is a holiday. – DGMS89 Dec 4 '18 at 12:12
  • You can put as much of your logic in there as you need to run each time the date turns out not to be valid. I'll edit the answer with an example. – Immijimmi Dec 4 '18 at 12:17
  • Thanks for adding the example. I am just a little confused: I understand the first check to see if date is on the holiday list. My problem is: if the date is not on holiday list, I still should check if it is a weekday (if not add days), and then check it again for the holiday list. But I don't understand how can the code account for that if the weekday() check is inside the function. – DGMS89 Dec 4 '18 at 12:34
  • 1
    What this loop is essentially doing is as follows: Is the date in the holiday_list? If not, is it weekday 5? If not, is it weekday 6? If none of those are the case, valid is set to True. When the loop starts again it will check if not valid and as valid is True, it will stop there and will not run the loop code again. If any of those conditions are met during the loop, it will add the days on and then move to the bottom of the if - elif - else block since it has matched one of them already. Then the loop starts over and it repeats the if - elif - else checks. – Immijimmi Dec 4 '18 at 12:40

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