0

Students.txt

64 Mary Ryan
89 Michael Murphy
22 Pepe
78 Jenny Smith
57 Patrick James McMahon
89 John Kelly
22 Pepe
74 John C. Reilly

My code

f = open("students.txt","r")
for line in f:
    words = line.strip().split()
    mark = (words[0])
    name = " ".join(words[1:])
    for i in (mark):
        print(i)

The output im getting is

6
4
8
9
2
2
7
8
etc...

My expected output is

64 80 22 78 etc..

Just curious to know how I would print the whole integer, not just a single integer at a time.

Any help would be more than appreciative.

  • 1
    Replace words[1:] with words[2:]. – Eb946207 Dec 4 '18 at 18:14
  • for line in f:words = line.strip().split() should be written on two lines – mmenschig Dec 4 '18 at 18:24
  • Try (words[:2])name. – Matt Cremeens Dec 4 '18 at 18:24
0

As I can see you have some integer with a string in the text file. You wanted to know about your code will output only full Integer.

You can use the code

f = open("Students.txt","r")
for line in f:
    l = line.split(" ")
    print(l[0])
0

In Python, when you do this:

for i in (mark):
  print(i)

and mark is of type string, you are asking Python to iterate over each character in the string. So, if your string contains space-separated integers and you iterate over the string, you'll get one integer at a time.

I believe in your code the line

 mark = (words[0])name = " ".join(words[1:])

is a typo. If you fix that we can help you with what's missing (it's most likely a statement like mark = something.split(), but not sure what something is based on the code).

0

You should be using context managers when you open files so that they are automatically closed for you when the scope ends. Also mark should be a list to which you append the first element of the line split. All together it will look like this:

with open("students.txt","r") as f:
    mark = []
    for line in f:
        mark.append(line.strip().split()[0])
for i in mark:
    print(i)
0

The line

for i in (mark):

is same as this because mark is a string:

for i in mark:

I believe you want to make mark an element of some iterable, which you can create a tuple with single item by:

for i in (mark,):

and this should give what you want.

  • Hi thanks that works , but I dont understand how that works – Matty_boy98 Dec 5 '18 at 17:20
  • e.g. (1) is a number 1 and ('hello') is a string 'hello' which the bracket is optional. However, (1,) and ('hello',) are tuples and the brakcets and commas are significant here. In your case, you want to loop through a one-element iterable. Therefore you do not want to present mark as a string but use (mark,) as a one-element tuple instead. Otherwise you're looping through all characters in the string mark – adrtam Dec 5 '18 at 19:43
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in your line:

line.strip().split()

you're not telling the sting to split based on a space. Try the following:

str(line).strip().split(" ")
  • 1
    I believe space is the default when no arguments are supplied. – Matt Cremeens Dec 4 '18 at 18:16
  • Okay I done line.strip().split(" ") but hasnt helped – Matty_boy98 Dec 4 '18 at 18:20
  • added string coercion to the 'line' to allow for numerics – Schalton Dec 4 '18 at 19:07
0

A quick one with list comprehensions:

with open("students.txt","r") as f:    
    mark = [line.strip().split()[0] for line in f]
for i in mark:
    print(i)
  • Thank you , Im bit rusty on list comprehensions but thats a nice way to do it – Matty_boy98 Dec 5 '18 at 17:23

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