13

I am trying to figure out how or if it is possible to do the following with Moq

public class Download
{
    private IFoo ifoo;

    public Download(IFoo ifoo)
    {
        this.ifoo = ifoo;
    }

    public void Download()
    {
        var files = Directory.GetFiles("filepath"); //<<<===

        foreach (var item in files)
        {

            // do something

        }    
    }
}

In unit test.

// Arrange 

var mockFoo = new Mock<IFoo>();
mockFoo.setup( s => s.Bar()).returns(true);

var foo = new Foo(mockFoo.Object);

// Act
foo.Download()

How can I mock the files variable, so the method uses the mock version. Is this even the correct approach? As I am not mocking the class, and rather mocking the dependency how do I go about settings the files variable so it looks at mocked file string[].

6
  • 3
    Tightly coupled to static Directory. That should be extracted out and encapsulated behind an abstraction you control
    – Nkosi
    Dec 4, 2018 at 19:59
  • good point, is there a short term solution that I could use? the abstraction is going to take sometime as this was a simplified example
    – Harry
    Dec 4, 2018 at 20:04
  • Unless you can find a mock library that can weave that call. I think TypeMock can but I am not sure if it is free
    – Nkosi
    Dec 4, 2018 at 20:07
  • You could probably also check Microsoft Fakes learn.microsoft.com/en-us/previous-versions/visualstudio/…
    – Nkosi
    Dec 4, 2018 at 20:10
  • Take a look at this: learn.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/…. This contains classes for reading physical files, but also abstractions that can be mocked. So instead of depending on Directory.GetFiles("filepath") you would depend on IFileProvider.GetDirectoryContents("path"); Dec 4, 2018 at 20:15

1 Answer 1

17

You would need to depend on an abstraction to get your files instead of having a hard dependency on System.IO.Directory:

public interface IFileProvider
{
    string[] GetFiles(string path);
}

public class PhysicalFileProvider : IFileProvider
{
    public string[] GetFiles(string path)
    {
        return Directory.GetFiles(path);
    }
}

You would inject the abstraction in exactly the same way as you're injecting IFoo. Now you can mock IFileProvider using Moq, creating a mock that returns exactly the strings that you want it to return.

var fileProvider = new Mock<IFileProvider>();
fileProvider.Setup(x => x.GetFiles(It.IsAny<string>()))
    .Returns(new[] {"file1.txt", "file2.txt"});

You can also use Microsoft.Extensions.FileProviders.Physical which provides both the file system access and the abstraction.

public class Download
{
    private readonly IFoo _foo;
    private readonly Microsoft.Extensions.FileProviders.IFileProvider _fileProvider;

    public Download(IFoo foo, IFileProvider fileProvider)
    {
        _foo = foo;
        _fileProvider = fileProvider;
    }

    public void SomethingWithFiles()
    {
        var files = _fileProvider.GetDirectoryContents("filepath")
            .Where(item => !item.IsDirectory);

        foreach (var item in files)
        {
            // something
        }
    }
}

The concrete implementation would be PhysicalFileProvider.


One more variation. Instead of injecting an interface, inject a delegate:

public delegate string[] GetFilesFunction(string path);

public class Download
{
    private readonly IFoo _foo;
    private readonly GetFilesFunction _getFiles;

    public Download(IFoo foo, GetFilesFunction getFiles)
    {
        _foo = foo;
        _getFiles = getFiles;
    }

...

That's even easier to mock. You don't even need Moq.

var subject = new Download(mockedFoo, path => new []{"file1.txt","file2.txt"} );
0

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