A delay will always occur between a user action and an application response.

It is well known that the lower the response delay, the greater the feeling of the application responding instantaneously. It is also commonly known that a delay of up to 100ms is generally not perceivable. But what about a delay of 110ms?

What is the shortest application response delay that can be perceived?

I'm interested in any solid evidence, general thoughts and opinions.

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    I don't really get your question... Besides promoting your test site, what answers do you expect to get here?? – Yuval Adam Feb 11 '09 at 10:55
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    @Yuval A: I am genuinely interested in opinions on the perception of application response delays. As for the research, it's of a purely academic nature, the results of which will be freely published in a few months' time. – Jon Cram Feb 11 '09 at 19:13
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    "shortest perceivable" is different than shortest tolerable. I am pretty sure I could perceive a 200ms delay, But I think i could tolerate (and regard as 'instantaneous') a 1-3 second delay. Your question as phrased has to do with physiology and not UI – Scott Evernden Feb 12 '09 at 0:01
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    Just a note, 100ms is the "tolerable" delay for getting feedback from an application. Perception works at much higher speeds. Monitors for games for are ok at around 20-30 ms and less than 10 ms for fast response games. 100 ms is a long time in a deathmatch lan party game. – unom Jun 11 '14 at 10:02

11 Answers 11

up vote 27 down vote accepted

What I remember learning was that any latency of more than 1/10th of a second (100ms) for the appearance of letters after typing them begins to negatively impact productivity (you instinctively slow down, less sure you have typed correctly, for example), but that below that level of latency productivity is essentially flat.

Given that description, it's possible that a latency of less than 100ms might be perceivable as not being instantaneous (for example, trained baseball umpires can probably resolve the order of two events even closer together than 100ms), but it is fast enough to be considered an immediate response for feedback, as far as effects on productivity. A latency of 100ms and greater is definitely perceivable, even if it's still reasonably fast.

That's for visual feedback that a specific input has been received. Then there'd be a standard of responsiveness in a requested operation. If you click on a form button, getting visual feedback of that click (eg. the button displays a "depressed" look) within 100ms is still ideal, but after that you expect something else to happen. If nothing happens within a second or two, as others have said, you really wonder if it took the click or ignored it, thus the standard of displaying some sort of "working..." indicator when an operation might take more than a second before showing a clear effect (eg. waiting for a new window to pop up).

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    "any latency of more than 1/10th of a second ... begins to negatively impact productivity" - excellent, good to know. Did you learn this from a formal source such as a book? If so, can you recall where this comes from? – Jon Cram Feb 12 '09 at 8:13
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    Unfortunately, no, I don't remember where that was from. I just remember being taught/told that back in grad school (or possibly before). My recollection was that it had come from a study (and I'm specifically remembering it having to do with typing, not necessarily a GUI). – Rob Parker Feb 12 '09 at 16:24
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    BTW, grad school for me was back around 1992-1994. – Rob Parker Feb 12 '09 at 16:25

The 100 ms threshold was established over 30 yrs ago. See:

Card, S. K., Robertson, G. G., and Mackinlay, J. D. (1991). The information visualizer: An information workspace. Proc. ACM CHI'91 Conf. (New Orleans, LA, 28 April-2 May), 181-188.

Miller, R. B. (1968). Response time in man-computer conversational transactions. Proc. AFIPS Fall Joint Computer Conference Vol. 33, 267-277.

Myers, B. A. (1985). The importance of percent-done progress indicators for computer-human interfaces. Proc. ACM CHI'85 Conf. (San Francisco, CA, 14-18 April), 11-17.

New research as of January, 2014:

http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/in-the-blink-of-an-eye-0116

...a team of neuroscientists from MIT has found that the human brain can process entire images that the eye sees for as little as 13 milliseconds...That speed is far faster than the 100 milliseconds suggested by previous studies...

  • I just looked at this to write a paper. Fail the researchers in this study used monitors with a 75hz refresh rate or 13.3ms per frame. They assumed the monitors did 12ms refreshes. – danny117 Dec 8 '14 at 18:45
  • Look the researchers tested for 13ms 27ms 53ms and 80ms which are one frame on a 75mz monitor 13.3ms, two frames 26.6ms, 4 frames 53.2, and six frames 79.8ms. I would like to see these tests redone on gaming hardware something better than the 75mhz monitors used in the study. I already know I can see changes on a 75hz monitor but what about a 120hz monitor would the results be the same. – danny117 Dec 9 '14 at 1:42

I don't think anecdotes or opinions are really valid for answers here. This question touches on the psychology of user experience and the sub-conscious mind. The human brain is powerful and fast and mere milliseconds do count and are registered. I am no expert but I know there is much science behind e.g. what Matt Jacobsen mentioned. Check out Google's study here http://code.google.com/speed/files/delayexp.pdf for an idea of how much it can affect site traffic.

Here's another study by Akami - 2 second response time http://www.akamai.com/html/about/press/releases/2009/press_091409.html (From https://ux.stackexchange.com/questions/5529/once-apon-a-time-there-was-a-10-seconds-to-load-a-page-rule-what-is-it-nowa )

Does anyone have any other studies to share?

Persistence of vision is around 100ms so it should be a reasonable visual feedback delay. 110ms should make no difference, as it is an approximate value. In practice you won't notice a delay below 200ms.

Out of my memory, studies have shown that users lose patience and retry an operation after around 2s of inactivity (in the absence of feedback), e.g. clicking on a confirm or action button. So plan on using some kind of animation if the action takes longer than 1s.

At the San Francisco Opera house, we routinely setup precise delay setting for each of our speakers. We can detect 5 millisecond changes in delay times to our speakers. When you make such subtle changes, you change where the sound sources from. Often times we want sound to sound as if it's coming from someplace other than were the speakers are. Precise delay adjustments make this possible. Sound delays of 15 milliseconds are very obvious even to untrained ears because it radically shifts where the sound sources from. A simple test is to prove this is to play sound through multiple speakers, and have the subject close their eyes and point to where the sound is coming from. Now make a slight change in the delay time to one of the speakers of just a few milliseconds, and have the person point again to where the sound is coming from. Making changes in delay times is acoustically very similar to moving the actual speakers.

I worked on an application that had a explicit business goal of being blindingly fast, and we had a max allowed server time of 150ms for processing a full web page.

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    What application was it that has a 'blindingly fast' as a business goal? – Jon Cram Feb 11 '09 at 19:15

No solid evidence but for our own application, we allow a maximum of one second between a user action and feedback. If it does take longer, a "waiting box" should be shown.

A user should see "something" happening within a second of causing an action.

100ms is totally wrong. You can prove this yourself using your fingers, a desk, and a watch with visible seconds. Synchronising to the watch's seconds, drum out beats on the desk continuously such that 16 beats are drummed out every second. I chose 16 because it is natural to drum out multiples of two, so it's like four strong beats with three weak beats in between. Adjacent beats are clearly discernible by their sound. The beats are separated by about 60ms, so even 60 ms is actually still too high. Therefore the threshold is way below 100ms, especially if sound is involved.

For instance, a drum app or a keyboard app needs a delay of more like 30ms, or else it gets really annoying, because you hear the sound coming from the physical button / pad / key well before the sound comes out of the speakers. Software like ASIO and jack were made specifically to deal with this issue, so no excuses. If your drum app has a 100ms delay, I will hate you.

The situation for VoIP and high powered gaming is actually worse, because you need to react to events in real time, and in music, at least you get to plan ahead at least a little. For an average human reaction time of 200ms, a further 100ms delay is an enormous penalty. It noticeably changes the conversational flow of VoIP. In gaming, 200ms reaction time is generous, especially if the players have a lot of practice.

For web applications 200ms is considered as unnoticable delay, while 500ms is acceptable.

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    how did you come about these numbers? – MorganTiley Nov 7 '11 at 16:43
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    @MorganTiley, randomly. =) – anatoly techtonik Jun 22 '15 at 7:56

I am a cognitive neuroscientist who studies visual perception and cognition.

The paper by Mary Potter mentioned above regards the minimum time required to categorize a visual stimulus. However, understand that this is under laboratory conditions in the absence of any other visual stimuli, which certainly would not be the case in the real world user experience.

The typical benchmark for a stimulus-response / input-stimulus interaction, that is, the average amount of time for an individuals minimum reaction speed or input-response detection is ~200ms. to be certain there is no detectable difference, this threshold could be lowered to around 100ms. Below this threshold, the temporal dynamics of your cognitive processes take longer to compute the event than the event itself, so there is nearly no chance of any ability to detect or differentiate it. You could go lower to say 50 ms, but it really wouldn't be necessary. 10 ms and you've gone into the territory of overkill.

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    Of interest: danluu.com/keyboard-latency – Kieren Johnstone Oct 17 '17 at 8:06
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    "Below this threshold (100ms), the temporal dynamics of your cognitive processes take longer to compute the event than the event itself". And yet musicians are able to play temporally accurately to around 10ms resolution. How is this possible if what you claim is true? (Also - the Haas effect has strong effects with delays around 5ms...) The answer is simple - there's a logical error in your comment. Just because people perceive things 200ms after the fact does not logically imply that you can't perceive small time differences much less than 200ms... – Tom Swirly Oct 18 '17 at 10:27

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