5

What could be the shortest possible way to get a list of all the modules implementing a behaviour?

e.g.

defmodule X do
  @callback foo()
end

defmodule A do
  @behaviour X
  def foo() do
    "hello"
  end
end

defmodule B do
  @behaviour X
  def foo() do
    "world"
  end
end

I would like to get a list as [A,B]. I tried loading all the modules and then filtering using the key attribute behaviour but I think it's going to be very slow. Is there any other way?

4 Answers 4

11

No, there is no better way. Behaviours are not indexed in any way, as they are a compile-time feature used to check that all required callback functions have been defined. So something like this is as good as it gets:

for {module, _} <- :code.all_loaded(),
    X in (module.module_info(:attributes)[:behaviour] || []) do
        module
end
0
4

To continue on the solution @legoscia provided. There may be a case where you are implementing more than 1 behaviour per module, in such case something like this:

for {module, _} <- :code.all_loaded(),
    __MODULE__ in (module.module_info(:attributes)
                   |> Keyword.get_values(:behaviour)
                   |> List.flatten()) do
  module
end

Should be used as Keyword lists can have duplicated keys and accessing them directly won't return the desired result.

Thanks @legoscia!

2

I found out another way of doing this, since :code.all_loaded() was not working for me. Instead I use :application.get_key/2 which is more specific:

case :application.get_key(:my_app, :modules) do
      {:ok, modules} ->
        modules
        |> Enum.filter(fn module -> (module.module_info(:attributes)[:behaviour] || []) |> Enum.member?(MyBehaviour) end)

      error -> {:error, error}
    end

This did the trick for me, hopefully it helps someone else also.

0

Yet another approach is to extract module attributes directly from the .beam files. It should extract behaviours from all modules, that your Elixir instance knows about. It extracts attributes from library modules too.

defmodule BehaviourMapping do
  @behaviour_mapping_key __MODULE__
  @mapping_not_found :not_found

  def recompute_mapping do
    behaviours_by_module =
      :code.all_available()
      |> Enum.map(&elem(&1, 1))
      |> Task.async_stream(:beam_lib, :chunks, [[:attributes]], ordered: false)
      |> Enum.reduce(%{}, fn
        {:ok, {:ok, {module, [attributes: attrs]}}}, acc ->
          case Keyword.get_values(attrs, :behaviour) do
            [] -> acc
            behaviours -> Map.put(acc, module, List.flatten(behaviours))
          end

        _, acc ->
          acc
      end)

    behaviours_by_module =
      case Code.ensure_compiled(:cover) do
        {:module, compiled_module} ->
          for module <- compiled_module.modules(),
              into: behaviours_by_module do
            behaviours =
              module.__info__(:attributes)
              |> Keyword.get_values(:behaviour)
              |> List.flatten()

            {module, behaviours}
          end

        _ ->
          behaviours_by_module
      end

    result =
      for {module, behaviours} <- behaviours_by_module,
          behaviour <- behaviours,
          reduce: %{} do
        mapping ->
          Map.update(
            mapping,
            behaviour,
            MapSet.new([module]),
            &MapSet.put(&1, module)
          )
      end

    :persistent_term.put(@behaviour_mapping_key, result)
    result
  end

  def mapping do
    case :persistent_term.get(@behaviour_mapping_key, @mapping_not_found) do
      @mapping_not_found ->
        recompute_mapping()

      result ->
        result
    end
  end
end

The function BehaviourMapping.recompute_mapping/0 returns a map, where keys are the behaviour modules, and values are MapSets of modules, that implement this behaviour. It also uses persistent_term to cache the computation results.

The function BehaviourMapping.mapping/0 uses tries to take results from persistent term or recomputes the mapping.

When Erlang (and Elixir) cover-compiles modules, they are marked as :modified, so :beam_lib.chunks is not able to load and extract attributes from them. The loop related to :cover.modules() extracts attributes from such files too.

If your project has Elixir version at least 1.4.0, then you can speed up recomputation with Task.async_stream/5 function. I have tested it on my machine and it provided about 30% performance gains for 2000+ available sources.

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