4

I’m new to ES6, trying to make a function that moves all zeros in the array in the last position of the array while preserving the original order of the array E.g. [1,0,0,0,2,3,4,5] => [1,2,3,4,5,0,0,0]

 function moveZeros (arr) {
  let zeroArr = [];
    for(let i = 0;i < arr.length;i++) {
    if (arr[i] == 0) {
     zeroArr.push(arr[i]);
     arr.splice(i, 1);
    }
  }
  arr.push(...zeroArr);
  return arr;
} 

This is my code its works fine, but I think this can be shorter more in using some ES6 features. Can someone provide a better solution

1
  • euuuh. What about a regular sort?...
    – briosheje
    Dec 5, 2018 at 11:27

5 Answers 5

7

That can be solved easily using filter function and spread operator, .

const moveZeros = arr => {
  const z = arr.filter(a => a === 0); // get all zeroes
  const nZ = arr.filter(a => a !== 0); // get all non zeroes
  return [...nZ, ...z]; // put the zeroes on the last position
};
5

As requested in comments: what about sort?

arr.sort((a, b) => -!b)

It is for sure less performant, but hella shorter

Old

Onecompileman got an ok solution, but as OP wanted 'shorter' solution, i think we can reduce some unnecessary parts:

const moveZeros = a => [...a.filter(x => !!x), ...a.filter(x => !x)]
2

@lucifer63 gave a short and good solution but the double not operator is both useless and confusing, removing it you'll get an improvement:

const moveZeros = z => [...z.filter(a => a), ...z.filter(a => !a)]
moveZeros([1,0,0,0,2,3,4,5])
// [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 0, 0, 0]

1
  • 1
    Somehow i thought it would be actually more accurate to explicitly state that we want our value to be boolean right from the start, but yeah, you're right, it works without double not
    – lucifer63
    Dec 5, 2018 at 11:41
1

You could use reduceRight and if the element is 0 use push or if its not 0 use unshift.

const arr = [1,0,0,0,2,3,4,5];
const res = arr.reduceRight((r, e) => (e === 0 ? r.push(e) : r.unshift(e), r), [])
console.log(res)

1

You could reduce the array by splicing the result array either on the actual position or at an adjusted index, which counts the not null values.

function moveZeroes(array) {
    return array.reduce((i => (r, v, j) => (r.splice(!v ? j : i++, 0, v), r))(0), []);
}

console.log(moveZeroes([1, 0, 0, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5]));

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