-2

For this code sample the Java compiler is not happy:

public class Test1 {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    int x = 99;
    {
      int x = 10;
      System.out.println(x);
    }
    System.out.println(x);
  }
}

The compiler says:

error: variable x is already defined in method main(String[])

However, the Java compiler is completely satisfied with this:

public class Test1 {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    {
      int x = 10;
      System.out.println(x);
    }
    int x = 99;
    System.out.println(x);
  }
}

And that is a little piece of insanity in Java. When I look up Java scoping rules, I'm almost always seeing writers describe that variables are scoped within the block level they're in, except for instances of object level variables which retain their values for the instance lifetime.

None of them explain the rules in a way that explains the way the Java compiler deals with the code samples here. But as we can see from these two obvious examples, the scoping rules don't really work the way everyone is describing them.

Will someone explain this correctly, please, so that I am understanding it properly?

  • The inner blocklevel lives in the outer scope level, which already has the int (in the first case), in the 2nd case the outer scope level doesn't have the int (just yet). – Adelin Dec 5 '18 at 13:41
  • 2
    Nope and nope. It works perfect, you can see outer from inner, but not inner from outer that's it – azro Dec 5 '18 at 13:42
  • To add to the answers below, what is the alternative? You seem to be of the opinion that in the first example, the outer definition of variable x should not be visible from within the inner code block. – Jamie Dec 5 '18 at 13:56
  • To me - my expectation was that both code samples would compile fine - i.e., that the "inner x" is simply a different variable entirely from the outer x (which it is, regardless of the fact that another variable named "x" has been defined in an outer scope), and that any reference to "x" in the inner block is to the "inner x". On the other hand, after the compiler complained on my first sample (which is an example boiled down greatly from a larger program I'm currently working on), I was rather surprised that the compiler accepted the second example. I do get it - but it seems jarring to me. – Steve Greene Dec 5 '18 at 14:11
  • There's nothing strange or unique about it. Scope constraints are not bidirectional. If one scope is nested in another, the child inherits visibility from the parent scope but not vice-versa. – shmosel Dec 23 '18 at 21:54
2
int x = 99;
{
  int x = 10;   // variable x defined before is still available, so you can not define it again
  System.out.println(x);
}
System.out.println(x);

And:

{
  int x = 10;
  System.out.println(x);
}
int x = 99;    // variable x defined before is not available, so you can define it again
System.out.println(x);
1

I can try to explain, but without knowledge of the exact rules.

In the first example, both x would be known in the inner scope. That's not allowed.

In the second example, in the inner scope, the outer x isn't defined yet. So there is no problem.

1
public class Test1 {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    int x = 99;
    {
      int x = 10; // not allowed because the fist x is visible/known here
      System.out.println(x);
    }
    System.out.println(x);
  }
}

The scope of the first x in the first code is within the main method so x is visible everywhere within the method , that is why it is not allowing re-declaring it.

where as in the second code the the scope of the first x is within the block {} so since out of this block x is not visible or not known, declaring the second x is allowed.

public class Test1 {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    {
      int x = 10;
      System.out.println(x);
    // x gets out of scope after this closing block
    }
    int x = 99;  // allowed because the first x got out of scope
    System.out.println(x);
  }
}
0

It is not a problem with Java. The scoped variable x has gone out of scope when the second x is declared and used.

  • Clearly this short answer is not enough to actually answer the concerns – Adelin Dec 5 '18 at 13:41

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