25

I want to save state to localStorage when a component is unmounted. This used to work in componentWillUnmount.

I tried to do the same with the useEffect hook, but it seems state is not correct in the return function of useEffect.

Why is that? How can I save state without using a class?

Here is a dummy example. When you press close, the result is always 0.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

function Example() {
  const [tab, setTab] = useState(0);
  return (
    <div>
      {tab === 0 && <Content onClose={() => setTab(1)} />}
      {tab === 1 && <div>Why is count in console always 0 ?</div>}
    </div>
  );
}

function Content(props) {
  const [count, setCount] = useState(0);

  useEffect(() => {
    // TODO: Load state from localStorage on mount

    return () => {
      console.log("count:", count);
    };
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      <p>Day: {count}</p>
      <button onClick={() => setCount(count - 1)}>-1</button>
      <button onClick={() => setCount(count + 1)}>+1</button>
      <button onClick={() => props.onClose()}>close</button>
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<Example />, document.querySelector("#app"));

CodeSandbox

20

I tried to do the same with the useEffect hook, but it seems state is not correct in the return function of useEffect.

The reason for this is due to closures. A closure is a function's reference to the variables in its scope. Your useEffect callback is only ran once when the component mounts and hence the return callback is referencing the initial count value of 0.

The answers given here are what I would recommend. I would recommend @Jed Richard's answer of passing [count] to useEffect, which has the effect of writing to localStorage only when count changes. This is better than the approach of not passing anything at all writing on every update. Unless you are changing count extremely frequently (every few ms), you wouldn't see a performance issue and it's fine to write to localStorage whenever count changes.

useEffect(() => { ... }, [count]);

If you insist on only writing to localStorage on unmount, there's an ugly hack/solution you can use - refs. Basically you would create a variable that is present throughout the whole lifecycle of the component which you can reference from anywhere within it. However, you would have to manually sync your state with that value and it's extremely troublesome. Refs don't give you the closure issue mentioned above because refs is an object with a current field and multiple calls to useRef will return you the same object. As long as you mutate the .current value, your useEffect can always (only) read the most updated value.

CodeSandbox link

const {useState, useEffect, useRef} = React;

function Example() {
  const [tab, setTab] = useState(0);
  return (
    <div>
      {tab === 0 && <Content onClose={() => setTab(1)} />}
      {tab === 1 && <div>Count in console is not always 0</div>}
    </div>
  );
}

function Content(props) {
  const value = useRef(0);
  const [count, setCount] = useState(value.current);

  useEffect(() => {
    return () => {
      console.log('count:', value.current);
    };
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>
      <p>Day: {count}</p>
      <button
        onClick={() => {
          value.current -= 1;
          setCount(value.current);
        }}
      >
        -1
      </button>
      <button
        onClick={() => {
          value.current += 1;
          setCount(value.current);
        }}
      >
        +1
      </button>
      <button onClick={() => props.onClose()}>close</button>
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<Example />, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

4

Your useEffect callback function is showing the initial count, that is because your useEffect is run only once on the initial render and the callback is stored with the value of count that was present during the iniital render which is zero.

What you would instead do in your case is

 useEffect(() => {
    // TODO: Load state from localStorage on mount
    return () => {
      console.log("count:", count);
    };
  });

In the react docs, you would find a reason on why it is defined like this

When exactly does React clean up an effect? React performs the cleanup when the component unmounts. However, as we learned earlier, effects run for every render and not just once. This is why React also cleans up effects from the previous render before running the effects next time.

Read the react docs on Why Effects Run on Each Update

It does run on each render, to optimise it you can make it to run on count change. But this is the current proposed behavior of useEffect as also mentioned in the documentation and might change in the actual implementation.

 useEffect(() => {
    // TODO: Load state from localStorage on mount
    return () => {
      console.log("count:", count);
    };
  }, [count]);
  • But then it runs on every change? – r03 Dec 5 '18 at 13:58
  • It does run on each render, to optimise it you can make it to run on count change. But this is the current proposed behavior of useEffect as also mentioned in the documentation and might change in the actual implementation. – Shubham Khatri Dec 5 '18 at 17:53
  • your need to add an empty array as second parameter to useEffect in order to let it run on behalf of componentDidMount and componentDidUnmount only – decades Aug 21 '19 at 12:49
3

This will work - using React's useRef - but its not pretty:

function Content(props) {
  const [count, setCount] = useState(0);
  const countRef = useRef();
  // this effect fires every time count is changed
  useEffect(() => () => {
    countRef.current = count;
  },[count]);

  // this effect fires as per a true componentWillUnmount
  useEffect(() => () => {
    console.log("count:", countRef.current);
  }, []);
}

Note the slightly more bearable (in my opinion!) 'function that returns a function' code construct for useEffect.

The issue is that useEffect copies the props and state at composition time and so never re-evaluates them - which doesn't help this use case but then its not what useEffects are really for.

  • doesn't this declare them to the global scope, whereas const/let/var would scope them to the block? – James Wilson Nov 21 '19 at 10:13
  • @JamesWilson no it doesn't, variables declared inside a function are automatically scoped to that function. If it was you that downvoted my answer, I'll say no more. If you didn't, I'll gladly expand on my response if you want. – Andy Lorenz Nov 21 '19 at 14:38
  • I did not know that - although it seems that not using const/let/var is discouraged nearly everywhere? – James Wilson Nov 25 '19 at 8:46
  • @JamesWilson I'm not sure where I was going with my original answer, but though I was right I was also rather wrong too .. you are right its discouraged, and more to the point it wasn't the key to fixing the OP code. So I've completely changed my posting! – Andy Lorenz Nov 26 '19 at 17:46
2

The other answer is correct. And why not pass [count] to your useEffect, and so save to localStorage whenever count changes? There's no real performance penalty calling localStorage like that.

  • 2
    I don't need to load/save on every change. Only when the component is mounted/unmounted. In the example there is only a count, but I do a lot more in the real program. – r03 Dec 5 '18 at 14:02
  • 1
    If you've got a lot going on then create multiple hooks each one focussed on a specific task. I don't think there's any reason why you couldn't have a small hook who's only responsibility was to persist count to localStorage on change. – Jed Richards Dec 5 '18 at 18:10
  • But what if this is a not an onClick handler on a button, but an onChange handler on an input. That's called more often. Or the cleanup is trying to persist to a server instead of LocalStorage. You probably don't want the effect to run on each change. – Christiaan Westerbeek Dec 13 '18 at 10:53
2

Instead of manually tracking your state changes like in the accepted answer you can use useEffect to update the ref.

function Content(props) {
  const [count, setCount] = useState(0);
  const currentCountRef = useRef(count);

  // update the ref if the counter changes
  useEffect(() => {
    currentCountRef.current = count;
  }, [count]);

  // use the ref on unmount
  useEffect(
    () => () => {
      console.log("count:", currentCountRef.current);
    },
    []
  );

  return (
    <div>
      <p>Day: {count}</p>
      <button onClick={() => setCount(count - 1)}>-1</button>
      <button onClick={() => setCount(count + 1)}>+1</button>
      <button onClick={() => props.onClose()}>close</button>
    </div>
  );
}
0

What's happening is first time useEffect runs, it creating a closure over the value of state you're passing; then if you want to get the actual rather the first one.. you've two options:

  • Having the useEffect with a dependency over count, which will refresh it on each change on that dependency.
  • Use function updater on setCount.

If you do something like:

useEffect(() => {
  return () => {
    setCount((current)=>{ console.log('count:', current); return current; });
  };
}, []);

I am adding this solution just in case someone comes here looking for an issue trying to do an update based on old value into a useEffect without reload.

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