3

I have an interesting problem here. I have a couple of Javascript strings like so:

var a = "A few sentences. For tests. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.";
var b = "A couple more sentences. These ones are shorter.";
var c = "Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz. Test. Test 2. Test C.";
var d = "Test sentence.";

I would like to extend the string prototype to have a method to split each string into an array of two strings, each with as similar a number of characters as mathematically possible, while also maintaining whole sentences.

The results I'd be looking for:

a.halve() // ["A few sentences. For tests.", "The point of these sentences is to be used as examples."]
b.halve() // ["A couple more sentences.", "These ones are shorter."]
c.halve() // ["Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz.", "Test. Test 2. Test C."]
d.halve() // ["Test sentence.", ""]

If I do a.length / 2, I get the ideal target length of the two strings... I'm just having a hard time split'ing and joining them in the right order.

  • split() is for splitting on a delimiter character, not a position. Use substr(). – Barmar Dec 6 '18 at 1:54
  • Why is the second string in d.halve() empty? Shouldn't it be ["Test se", "ntence."]? – Barmar Dec 6 '18 at 1:56
  • It seems like you're restricted to split only at the end of a sentence, but that's not stated in the question. – Barmar Dec 6 '18 at 1:57
  • Yeah, sorry about that. I wasn't clear at first. I'd like to maintain whole sentences across this split. That's where I'm stuck. I've tried a few variations on spliting the string on "." and re-assembling... – xd1936 Dec 6 '18 at 2:00
  • You can't use split() for this. Calculate the mid-point, then search for the nearest . to that. Then use substr(). – Barmar Dec 6 '18 at 2:01
1

A quick solution :)

Reflect.set(String.prototype, 'halve', function(){
  let mid = Math.floor(this.length/2)
  let i = mid - 1, j = mid, sep = mid
  while(j<this.length) {
    if(this[i]==='.') { sep = i + 1; break }
    if(this[j]==='.') { sep = j + 1; break }
    i--
    j++
  }
  return [this.slice(0,sep), this.slice(sep)]
})

var a = "A few sentences. For tests. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.";
var b = "A couple more sentences. These ones are shorter.";
var c = "Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz. Test. Test 2. Test C.";
var d = "Test sentence.";

console.log(a.halve()) // ["A few sentences. For tests.", "The point of these sentences is to be used as examples."]
console.log(b.halve()) // ["A couple more sentences.", "These ones are shorter."]
console.log(c.halve()) // ["Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz.", "Test. Test 2. Test C."]
console.log(d.halve()) // ["Test sentence.", ""]
  • Incredibly efficient, concise, and smart. Plus, I've never heard of the Javascript Reflect object! So thanks for that too! – xd1936 Dec 6 '18 at 14:20
2

First split everything into sentences. Then find the best position and join again.

var a = "A few sentences. For tests. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.";
var b = "A couple more sentences. These ones are shorter.";
var c = "Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz. Test. Test 2. Test C.";
var d = "Test sentence.";

String.prototype.halve = function() {
  const ideaLength = this.length / 2;
  const sentences = this.split('.').map(it => it.trim()).filter(it => it != '');
  let current = sentences[0].length + 1;
  let min = Math.abs(current - ideaLength);
  let minPosition = 0;

  for (let i = 1; i < sentences.length; i++) {
    current = current + 2 + sentences[i].length;
    const different = Math.abs(ideaLength - current);
    
    if (different < min) {
      min = different;
      minPosition = i;
    }
  }
  
  const first = sentences.slice(0, minPosition + 1).join('. ') + ".";
  const second = sentences.slice(minPosition + 1).join('. ') + ".";
  
  return [first, second === "." ? "" : second];
}

console.log(a.halve());
console.log(b.halve());
console.log(c.halve());
console.log(d.halve());

  • Absolute perfection. I was halfway through my own implementation that wasn't nearly as elegant as this. Thank you so much! – xd1936 Dec 6 '18 at 2:33
1

This can be solved via figuring out where the middle is via indexOf and lastIndexOf:

var a = "A few sentences. For tests. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.";
var b = "A couple more sentences. These ones are shorter.";
var c = "Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz. Test. Test 2. Test C.";
var d = "Test sentence.";
var e = "A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples."
var f = "The point of these sentences is to be used as examples. A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H."

const half = str => {
  let middle = Math.floor(str.length / 2)
  let nextDot = str.lastIndexOf('.', middle)
  nextDot = nextDot <= 0 ? str.indexOf('.', middle)+1 : nextDot+1
  return [str.substr(0, nextDot), str.substr(nextDot, str.length).trim()]
}

console.log(half(a))
console.log(half(b))
console.log(half(c))
console.log(half(d))
console.log(half(e))
console.log(half(f))

The idea is to use a combination of lastIndexOf and indexOf in order to find out in which direction you need to go in terms of the middle position. Once you get that middle then it is just using substr to get the pieces.

  • 1
    An easy-to-follow and interesting approach! This doesn't split in half based on character length of the strings though. It works great for an exact splitting up on the number of sentences, but if I were to have var e = "A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.", it would return "A. B. C. D. E" and "F. G. H. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.", instead of "A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H." and "The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.". Cheers :) – xd1936 Dec 6 '18 at 14:12
  • Updated with even simpler implementation. Cheers. – Akrion Dec 6 '18 at 17:53
  • This is simple and brilliant. Excellent work. Because it starts halfway through the string and only searches in one direction, var e = "The point of these sentences is to be used as examples. A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H." breaks it ;) – xd1936 Dec 6 '18 at 22:12
  • :) no worries you just use indexOf when lastIndexOf does not find anything. Updated :). – Akrion Dec 7 '18 at 1:36
0

Below also gets the job done. It will split the sentence into an array based on when there is a " ". Using that new array, you can use Math.floor() to get the middle of the array and round it down. Some conditions then will then sort things.

var a = "A few sentences. For tests. The point of these sentences is to be used as examples.";
var b = "A couple more sentences. These ones are shorter.";
var c = "Blah. Foo. Bar. Baz. Test. Test 2. Test C.";
var d = "Test sentence.";

function splitString(str){
    var workSplit = str.split(" ");
    var midPoint = Math.floor(workSplit.length / 2);
    var result = [[],[]];
    for(var char in workSplit){
        if(char < midPoint){
            result[0].push(workSplit[char])
        } else {
            result[1].push(workSplit[char]);
        }
    }
    return [result[0].join(" "), result[1].join(" ")]
}

console.log(splitString(a));
console.log(splitString(b));
console.log(splitString(c));
console.log(splitString(d));
0

First, use this answer to find all occurences of "." in your string.

Then, find the dot that's closest to your middle, and split it there (for example, using the answer here: split string in two on given index and return both parts )

Some code:

function splitValue(value, index) {
  return [value.substring(0, index), value.substring(index)];
}

function splitStringInTwo(str) {
  const half = Math.trunc(str.length / 2);
  let slicePoint = {position: -1, distance: 9999};

  if (str.indexOf('.')  === -1) {
    return splitValue(str, str.length / 2);
  }

  for (let i = 1; i > 0; i =  str.indexOf('.', i) + 1) {
    if (Math.abs(i - half) < slicePoint.distance) {
      slicePoint = {position: i, distance: Math.abs(i - half)}; // Distance is shrinking, save it.
    } else {
      return splitValue(str, slicePoint.position); // Distance it growing. Stop.
    }
  }


}

const myString = "Here is a first string. My second, though, is larger by a fair amount of characters. I don't want it to be split.";

console.log(splitStringInTwo(myString));

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