So I'm trying to thread a member function but while using two different objects of a class (each object has a variable initialized to a different value). I know how to use multithreading if I want to pass a member function inside a class such as:

class ClassA{

public:
void func{}
}

int main{

thread t1(&ClassA func);
thread t2(&ClassA func);
}

Is there a way to use multithreading while referencing to a specific object under a class? I couldn't find anything online specific to this question.

For example we have:

class ClassA{

public:
ClassA(sf::texture tex) : sprite(tex){};
void func(){
//does sth with sprite for this object
}
private:
sf::sprite sprite;
};

int main{
ClassA class1(tex1);
ClassA class2(tex2);

//thread t1(&ClassA func, What should go here?)
//thread t2(&ClassA func, What should go here?)
}

I want to call func of respective class1 and class2 so that they both can use their own initialized tex.

There's two ways to really go about doing this.

I prefer the lambda approach, which lets you add some sometimes-necessary complexity that isn't part of func:

#include <thread>

class ClassA {
 public:
  ClassA(const char* c) : c_(c){};
  void func() {
    // Do thing.
  }

 private:
  const char* c_;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  ClassA obj1("HELLO");
  ClassA obj2("WORLD");

  std::thread t1([&obj1]() { obj1.func(); });
  std::thread t2([&obj2]() { obj2.func(); });

  t1.join();
  t2.join();
}

But there's also the pointer-to-member-function approach:

#include <thread>

class ClassA {
 public:
  ClassA(const char* c) : c_(c) {};
  void func() {
    // Do thing.
  }

 private:
  const char* c_;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
  ClassA obj1("HELLO");
  ClassA obj2("WORLD");

  std::thread t1(&ClassA::func, &obj1);
  std::thread t2(&ClassA::func, &obj2);

  t1.join();
  t2.join();
}

Since C++11, wrappers for functions and member functions can be used. Together with std::bind, you get "something" that represents a member function already bound to a particular object and - optionally - further parameters:

class MyClass {
public:

    void printX() const { cout << x << endl; };
    int x;
};

int main(){

    MyClass mco1 {1}, mco2 {2};

    auto f = std::bind(&MyClass::printX, &mco1);
    std::thread t1 (f);

    f = std::bind(&MyClass::printX, &mco2);
    std::thread t2 (f);


    t1.join();
    t2.join();

}
  • 1
    Using std::bind is not wrong, but generally lambdas are to be preferred. – super Dec 6 at 9:55
  • @super: What's the advantage of a lambda over a bound function in this concrete example? – Stephan Lechner Dec 6 at 22:31
  • Performance is one reason. Readability and less error prone, but that is more of an opinion. It's talked about in this cppcon talk. So in this concrete example there is probably no difference except preference. – super Dec 6 at 23:22

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