I have an idea to create my own code rewriter (is it called a preprocessor?), which rewrites the code of my own program to make it more fast (though less debuggable). This preprocessor will inline all functions in the code, replicate cycles, remove complex asserts, etc. The generated code will be saved in other folders for a final release compilation. The cycle replication means the following: such a code

  for i := 0 to count-1 do
    values[i] := values[i]*2;

will be replaced with the following:

var
  iterationscount:integer;
  divisibleloopscount:integer;
begin
iterationscount := count div 8;
divisibleloopcount := iterationscount * 8;
i:=0;
while i<divisibleloopcount do
  begin
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
    values[i] := values[i]*2;
    inc(i);
  end;

for i:=divisibleloopcount to count-1 do
  values[i] := values[i]*2;

My question is, how this replication would really increase the speed of the code. I don’t know how Delphi XE optimizes the standard code, and I even don’t know whether its compiler uses the multicore processors. Possibly in some cases this replicated code can become even slower than the original, because it will occupy more place in memory, in particular in the cash memory (and I don’t know whether the size of the cash memory can be changed by the program). Besides that, possibly it would be better to use For cycles (with two loop counters) instead of While, because the For cycle is better optimized in Delphi XE?

  • 4
    Before even thinking about changing code to optimize performance, profile the program first to find bottlenecks. Then, you might consider to optimize only those bottlenecks . – LU RD Dec 6 at 10:49
  • If you want to do loop unrolling, then do it right. Change the loop contents to: values[i] := values[i]*2; values[i+1] := values[i+1]*2; ... values[i+7] := values[i+7]*2; inc(i, 8);. Also, be sure to take care of any extras, i.e. if you must process anything else but a multiple of 8, e.g. 75 (= 9x8+3) items. The extra 3 can be done in a small loop, but should not be forgotten. If this actually increases the speed of your code should be extablished by profiling (e.g. AQTime for Delphi, see GetIt, or Eric Grange's Sampling Profiler). – Rudy Velthuis Dec 6 at 11:00
  • 1
    >If you want to do loop unrolling, then do it right. Change > the loop contents to: values[i] := values[i]*2; values[i+1] > := values[i+1]*2; ... values[i+7] := values[i+7]*2; inc(i, 8); This is not clear for me. I thought that the fastest code would look like this: type pval:^integer; pval:=addr(values[0]); … pval^:=pval^*2; inc(pval) pval^:=pval^*2; inc(pval) pval^:=pval^*2; inc(pval) … – Grigoriy Andrienko Dec 6 at 12:21
  • 3
    Yet again you are guessing rather than timing. Indexing into arrays is efficient. Your code to switch to using pointers could very well be slower. The first rule of optimisation is that you must measure carefully. This entire conversation is a total waste of time until you appreciate that. – David Heffernan Dec 6 at 12:35
  • 1
    The other thing is that quite often your program spends 90% of its time in a very small area of the code, and the biggest gains are to be hand by careful optimisation of that part of your code. Blindly optimising vast swathes of the code that are not bottlenecks is a total waste of effort. – David Heffernan Dec 6 at 16:02

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