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To show you how "expressive" the lambda calculus really is. The below expression computes 10! (ten factorial) using mainly elements of the lambda calculus, i.e.

  • identifiers
  • single argument lambdas
  • function calls

If you look carefully, you'll see that this expression has elements that are recursive, meaning that we can create recursive functions using just the lambda calculus!

This below code uses what is called the y-combinator

(((lambda (x)
    ((lambda (f)
       (lambda (n)
         (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
     (lambda (v) ((x x) v))))
  (lambda (x) ((lambda (f)
                 (lambda (n)
                   (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
               (lambda (v) ((x x) v)))))
 11)

This is an example from our lecture. We don't learn y-combinator. Maybe that's why it is so hard to understand the code above.

I tried to break the code piece by piece, but still don't get it.

;body1
((lambda (x)
    ((lambda (f)
       (lambda (n)
         (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
     (lambda (v) ((x x) v))))
  (lambda (x) ((lambda (f)
                 (lambda (n)
                   (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
               (lambda (v) ((x x) v)))))

;value1
11



;body2
(lambda (x)
    ((lambda (f)
       (lambda (n)
         (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
     (lambda (v) ((x x) v))))

;value2
(lambda (x) ((lambda (f)
                 (lambda (n)
                   (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
               (lambda (v) ((x x) v))))



;body3
lambda (x)

;value3
((lambda (f)
                 (lambda (n)
                   (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))
               (lambda (v) ((x x) v)))

;value3-body
(lambda (f)
                 (lambda (n)
                   (if (equal? n 0) 1 (* n (f (- n 1))))))

;value3-value
(lambda (v) ((x x) v))

marked as duplicate by Óscar López racket Dec 6 '18 at 15:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    It's a bit hard to explain... good news is, "The Little Schemer" does a fantastic job doing it; to truly "get" the Y-Combinator please take a look at that book. – Óscar López Dec 6 '18 at 15:38