I have a dataframe:

col1  col2
 a     0
 b     1
 c     1
 d     0
 c     1
 d     0

On 'col2' I want to keep only the first 1 from the top and replace every 1 below the first one with a 0, such that the output is:

col1  col2
 a     0
 b     1
 c     0
 d     0
 c     0
 d     0

Thank you very much.

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can find the index of the first 1 and set others to 0:

mask = df['col2'].eq(1)
df.loc[mask & (df.index != mask.idxmax()), 'col2'] = 0

For better performance, see Efficiently return the index of the first value satisfying condition in array.

  • Can you think of a good solution for the case when the index is arbitrary, like Index(['u', 'v', 'w', 'x', 'y', 'z'] AND col2 could be something like [2, 0, 0, 1, 3, 1]? – timgeb Dec 6 at 16:18
  • @timgeb, To adapt this solution, I think you can use positional indexing (instead of index labels). Something like df.loc[mask & (np.arange(df.shape[0]) != np.where(mask)[0][0]), 'col2'] = 0. But I'm sure there are more Pythonic ways. – jpp Dec 6 at 16:28
  • Ah, I thought of using numpy, too. Just a bit differently. See my case 3. ;) – timgeb Dec 6 at 16:30

np.flatnonzero

Because I thought we needed more answers

df.loc[df.index[np.flatnonzero(df.col2)[1:]], 'col2'] -= 1
df

  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     0
3    d     0
4    c     0
5    d     0

Same thing but a little more sneaky.

df.col2.values[np.flatnonzero(df.col2.values)[1:]] -= 1
df

  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     0
3    d     0
4    c     0
5    d     0

Case 1: df has only ones and zeros in col2 and integer indexes.

>>> df
  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     1
3    d     0
4    c     1
5    d     0

You can use:

>>> df.loc[df['col2'].idxmax() + 1:, 'col2'] = 0
>>> df
  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     0
3    d     0
4    c     0
5    d     0

Case2: df can have all kinds of values in col2 and has integer indexes.

>>> df # demo dataframe
  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     2
3    d     2
4    c     3
5    d     3

You can use:

>>> df.loc[(df['col2'] == 1).idxmax() + 1:, 'col2'] = 0
>>> df
  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     0
3    d     0
4    c     0
5    d     0

Case 3: df can have all kinds of values in col2 and has an arbitrary index.

>>> df
  col1  col2
u    a    -1
v    b     1
w    c     2
x    d     2
y    c     3
z    d     3

You can use:

>>> df['col2'].iloc[(df['col2'].values == 1).argmax() + 1:] = 0
>>> df
  col1  col2
u    a    -1
v    b     1
w    c     0
x    d     0
y    c     0
z    d     0

Using drop_duplicates with reindex

df.col2=df.col2.drop_duplicates().reindex(df.index,fill_value=0)
df
Out[1078]: 
  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     0
3    d     0
4    c     0
5    d     0

You can use numpy for an effficient solution:

a = df.col2.values
b = np.zeros_like(a)
b[a.argmax()] = 1
df.assign(col2=b)

  col1  col2
0    a     0
1    b     1
2    c     0
3    d     0
4    c     0
5    d     0

i like this too

data['col2'][np.where(data['col2'] == 1)[0][0]+1:] = 0
  • Chained indexing is not recommended. – jpp Dec 6 at 16:41
  • Thanks for the update.. – iamklaus Dec 7 at 8:43

Sooo many options, here's mine... almost the same as timgebs answer (found independently), but still different ;)

Find the index of col2 that has the first occurence of a 1, and change all row values after that index to 0:

df['col2'].iloc[df.col2.idxmax()+1:] = 0
  • Be careful, this sets all values to 0 after the specified index, not just the ones equal to 1. Though that's the same with some other answers too. – jpp Dec 6 at 16:42
  • Totally agree. Your solution is more general. – Sander van den Oord Dec 6 at 17:42
id = list(df["col2"]).index(1)
df.iloc[id+1:]["col2"].replace(1,0,inplace=True)
  • 3
    While this code may answer the question, providing additional context regarding how and/or why it solves the problem would improve the answer's long-term value. – Nic3500 Dec 6 at 16:00
  • Chained indexing is not recommended. – jpp Dec 6 at 16:41

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