I have an expiration date, that's declared as LocalDate in java. While saving in MariaDB its being saved as UTC, ie 5.5 hrs being deducted from the original time. So when Im saving expiration date as '10-05-2018' , it is being saved in database as '10-04-2018'. While retrieving Im getting the correct date, ie '10-05-2018'.

How do I make sure its being saved as the same date in database as well?

Update : Its weird, its showing different date in my machines database, but showing the right date in a different machine database.

  • How did you declare the date column? I suspect you didn't declare the date to be in a specific timezone so it'll use the server's default timezone. – Thomas Dec 6 at 15:55
  • How do you export the data from the database to the java application, json rest, hibernate or others? – Emax Dec 6 at 15:57
  • Aren’t you using the date datatype in MariaDB? It doesn’t have time of day, so there is no way of subtracting 5.5 hours. – Ole V.V. Dec 6 at 16:08
  • @Thomas : Yes we didnt delcare it to be in specific timezone. Its deployed in cloud. I suspect its taking whatever the zone its deployed in. Do I need to specify the timezone, which would be usually EST, but sometimes it can be used from PST too – user2296988 Dec 6 at 16:12
  • 1
    Study the difference between TIMESTAMP and DATATIME datatypes. – Rick James Dec 6 at 20:06

tl;dr

Using DATE in SQL, and LocalDate in Java, means never having a problem of five and a half hours.

DATE data type

To store a date-only value, without time-of-day and without time zone or offset, in your database, use a date-only data type for your column.

In both the SQL standard and MariaDB, that would be DATE.

With JDBC 4.2 and later you can directly exchange java.time objects such as LocalDate with the database.

LocalDate ld = LocalDate.of( 2018 , Month.JANUARY , 23 ) ;
myPreparedStatement.setObject( … , ld ) ;

And retrieval.

LocalDate ld = myResultSet.getObject( … , LocalDate.class ) ;

Example app

When debugging such a problem, set your real app code aside and make a little demo app such as this, to simplify the problem and eliminate various contributing factors.

Here is a simple but complete example app.

This example uses the H2 Database Engine, built in Java, for simplicity. Adapt this code to your particular database server to make a MCVE.

package com.basilbourque.example;

import java.sql.*;
import java.time.LocalDate;
import java.time.Month;

public class DateTest {
    public static void main ( String[] args ) {
        DateTest app = new DateTest();
        app.doIt();
    }

    private void doIt ( ) {
        try {
            Class.forName( "org.h2.Driver" );
        } catch ( ClassNotFoundException e ) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

        try (
                Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection( "jdbc:h2:mem:example_db;DB_CLOSE_DELAY=-1" ) ; // Set `DB_CLOSE_DELAY` to `-1` to keep in-memory database in existence after connection closes.
                Statement stmt = conn.createStatement() ;
        ) {
            // Create table.
            String sql = "CREATE TABLE event_ (\n" +
                    "  pkey_ IDENTITY NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY ,\n" +
                    "  name_ VARCHAR NOT NULL ,\n" +
                    "  when_ DATE NOT NULL\n" +
                    ") ; ";
            System.out.println( sql );
            stmt.execute( sql );

            // Insert row.
            sql = "INSERT INTO event_ ( name_ , when_ ) " + "VALUES ( ? , ? ) ;";
            try ( PreparedStatement preparedStatement = conn.prepareStatement( sql ) ; ) {
                String name = "whatever";
                LocalDate ld = LocalDate.of( 2018 , Month.JANUARY , 23 ) ;

                preparedStatement.setString( 1 , name );
                preparedStatement.setObject( 2 , ld );
                preparedStatement.executeUpdate();
            }

            // Query all.
            sql = "SELECT * FROM event_ ;";
            try ( ResultSet rs = stmt.executeQuery( sql ) ; ) {
                while ( rs.next() ) {
                    //Retrieve by column name
                    Long pkey = rs.getLong( "pkey_" );
                    String name = rs.getString( "name_" );
                    LocalDate ld = rs.getObject( "when_" , LocalDate.class );

                    //Display values
                    System.out.println( "pkey: " + pkey + " | name: " + name + " | when: " + ld );
                }
            }
        } catch ( SQLException e ) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

When run.

pkey: 1 | name: whatever | when: 2018-01-23

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