Hi I have written a code for finding 5 or more same element for each key.

dictionary = {'Mary': [7, 0, 19, 19, 9, 18, 8, 11, 6, 1], 'John': [0, 6, 7, 9, 18, 2, 4, 5, 13, 17], 'Paul': [17, 12, 18, 16, 9, 5, 6, 7, 0, 3], 'Joe': [4, 15, 2, 8, 3, 0, 6, 7, 9, 18], 'Peter': [5, 3, 10, 2, 4, 16, 7, 6, 15, 13], 'Maggie': [13, 6, 5, 4, 8, 9, 7, 18, 11, 10], 'Ken': [2, 18, 16, 6, 0, 17, 4, 15, 11, 7], 'Roger': [3, 1, 16, 4, 13, 14, 19, 11, 8, 0]}
clusterDict = {}
for key, value in dictionary.items():
    for searchKey, searchValue in dictionary.items():
        if key != searchKey:
            intersectionList = list(set(value).intersection(searchValue))
            intersectionList.sort()
            if len(intersectionList) >= 5:
                if str(intersectionList) not in clusterDict:
                    clusterDict[str(intersectionList)] = [key,searchKey]
                else:    
                    clusterDict[str(intersectionList)].append(key)
                    clusterDict[str(intersectionList)].append(searchKey)

for key, value in clusterDict.items():
    clusterDict[key] = list(set(value))

print(clusterDict)

If I add more key-value pairs into the dictionary. The processing speed will be slowed down a lot. I would like to know if there is any methods to find the intersection/ common items in a faster or optimized way. Thank you in advance

  • You will have anyway N² comparison as each entry is compared to each other. You may speed up a little your code storing directly sets and not list in dictionnary values. If the possible values of lists are less numerous than key, you may also reverse your dictionnary. – Vince Dec 6 at 16:01
  • i did some work, was able to find only two elements 6,7 which were common between the keys elements...(assuming your goal was "I have written a code for finding 5 or more same element for each key.") – iamklaus Dec 7 at 8:36

You can save a decent chunk of time by turning all lists to sets beforehand, and by not doing redundant checks (In the sense that for a list [A, B, C] your current code would effectively check both A intersect B, and B intersect A).
You can utilize itertools.combinations to generate all possible combinations.

from itertools import combinations
dictionary = {'Mary': [7, 0, 19, 19, 9, 18, 8, 11, 6, 1], 'John': [0, 6, 7, 9, 18, 2, 4, 5, 13, 17], 'Paul': [17, 12, 18, 16, 9, 5, 6, 7, 0, 3], 'Joe': [4, 15, 2, 8, 3, 0, 6, 7, 9, 18], 'Peter': [5, 3, 10, 2, 4, 16, 7, 6, 15, 13], 'Maggie': [13, 6, 5, 4, 8, 9, 7, 18, 11, 10], 'Ken': [2, 18, 16, 6, 0, 17, 4, 15, 11, 7], 'Roger': [3, 1, 16, 4, 13, 14, 19, 11, 8, 0]}
dict_of_sets = {k:set(v) for k,v in dictionary.items()}
clusterDict = {}

for (key1, value1), (key2, value2) in combinations(dict_of_sets.items(),2):
    intersect = value1.intersection(value2)
    if len(intersect) >= 5:
        #change keyword tuple to str if you wish to. 
        clusterDict.setdefault(tuple(sorted(intersect)),[]).extend([key1, key2])

Note that you can also use tuples for dictionary keys, which seems cleaner in my eyes atleast than just typecasting a list to string. However, feel free to change that part as you prefer.

This should be faster, but as these things go, this will still be an O(N^2) Complexity solution sadly. I am not aware of a way to reduce complexity further.

If I am understanding what you are trying to do, I think it is a bit more complicated than that. In the end, you need to traverse a lattice of all the possible intersections of values (see this figure to see what I mean). I wrote the following function for your problem:

def findClusters(dictionary, minSize):
    # Make a list with the initial pairs of set and name
    # Since two names may have all the same values each item is
    # a set of values and a set of names
    setList = {}
    for k, v in dictionary.items():
        if len(v) >= minSize:
            v = frozenset(v)
            setList.setdefault(v, set()).add(k)
    setList = list(setList.items())
    # Build the clusters dictionary
    clusterDict = {}
    # Iterate the list values and names
    for i, (s, k) in enumerate(setList):
        if len(k) > 1:
            # This happens if two names have the same values,
            # in which case that is already a cluster
            clusterDict.setdefault(s, set()).update(k)
        # This is the list of "open" lattice nodes
        open = [(s, k)]
        # This is the list of lists of continuations for each lattice node
        # Initially a node can be followed by any of the nodes after it in setList
        follows = [setList[i + 1:]]
        # While there are open nodes
        while open and follows:
            # Get the current node and its possible continuations
            (s1, k1), *open = open
            follow, *follows = follows
            # For each continuation
            for j, (s2, k2) in enumerate(follow):
                # Get the intersection of values of this node and the continuation
                s = s1.intersection(s2)
                # Only continue if it is big enough
                if len(s) >= minSize:
                    # Set of names for the node plus the continuation
                    k = k1.union(k2)
                    # Add the names to the cluster in the dictionary
                    clusterDict.setdefault(s, set()).update(k)
                    # Add the new node to the open list
                    open.append((s, k))
                    # The continuations for the new node are all the continuations after this one
                    follows.append(follow[j + 1:])
    return clusterDict

A small example:

dictionary = {
    'A': [1, 2, 3, 4],
    'B': [1, 2, 3],
    'C': [1, 2, 3, 4],
    'D': [1, 4],
}
minSize = 2
print(*findClusters(dictionary, minSize).items(), sep='\n')

Output:

(frozenset({1, 2, 3, 4}), {'C', 'A'})
(frozenset({1, 2, 3}), {'C', 'A', 'B'})
(frozenset({1, 4}), {'C', 'D', 'A'})

With the data in the question:

dictionary = {
    'Mary': [7, 0, 19, 19, 9, 18, 8, 11, 6, 1],
    'John': [0, 6, 7, 9, 18, 2, 4, 5, 13, 17],
    'Paul': [17, 12, 18, 16, 9, 5, 6, 7, 0, 3],
    'Joe': [4, 15, 2, 8, 3, 0, 6, 7, 9, 18],
    'Peter': [5, 3, 10, 2, 4, 16, 7, 6, 15, 13],
    'Maggie': [13, 6, 5, 4, 8, 9, 7, 18, 11, 10],
    'Ken': [2, 18, 16, 6, 0, 17, 4, 15, 11, 7],
    'Roger': [3, 1, 16, 4, 13, 14, 19, 11, 8, 0]
}
minSize = 5
print(*findClusters(dictionary, minSize).items(), sep='\n')

Output:

(frozenset({0, 6, 7, 9, 18}), {'Mary', 'Paul', 'John', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({0, 6, 7, 8, 9, 18}), {'Joe', 'Mary'})
(frozenset({6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 18}), {'Maggie', 'Mary'})
(frozenset({0, 6, 7, 11, 18}), {'Ken', 'Mary'})
(frozenset({0, 1, 8, 11, 19}), {'Roger', 'Mary'})
(frozenset({6, 7, 8, 9, 18}), {'Maggie', 'Joe', 'Mary'})
(frozenset({0, 5, 6, 7, 9, 17, 18}), {'Paul', 'John'})
(frozenset({0, 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 18}), {'John', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 13}), {'Peter', 'John'})
(frozenset({4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 18}), {'Maggie', 'John'})
(frozenset({0, 2, 4, 6, 7, 17, 18}), {'Ken', 'John'})
(frozenset({5, 6, 7, 9, 18}), {'Maggie', 'Paul', 'John'})
(frozenset({0, 6, 7, 17, 18}), {'Paul', 'Ken', 'John'})
(frozenset({4, 6, 7, 9, 18}), {'Maggie', 'John', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({0, 2, 4, 6, 7, 18}), {'Ken', 'John', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({4, 5, 6, 7, 13}), {'Maggie', 'Peter', 'John'})
(frozenset({0, 3, 6, 7, 9, 18}), {'Paul', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({3, 5, 6, 7, 16}), {'Paul', 'Peter'})
(frozenset({0, 6, 7, 16, 17, 18}), {'Paul', 'Ken'})
(frozenset({2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 15}), {'Peter', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 18}), {'Maggie', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({0, 2, 4, 6, 7, 15, 18}), {'Ken', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({2, 4, 6, 7, 15}), {'Peter', 'Ken', 'Joe'})
(frozenset({4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 13}), {'Maggie', 'Peter'})
(frozenset({2, 4, 6, 7, 15, 16}), {'Peter', 'Ken'})
(frozenset({4, 6, 7, 11, 18}), {'Maggie', 'Ken'})

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