In a Powershell script, I have two data sets that have multiple columns. Not all these columns are shared.

For example, data set 1:

A B    XY   ZY  
- -    --   --  
1 val1 foo1 bar1
2 val2 foo2 bar2
3 val3 foo3 bar3
4 val4 foo4 bar4
5 val5 foo5 bar5
6 val6 foo6 bar6

and data set 2:

A B    ABC  GH  
- -    ---  --  
3 val3 foo3 bar3
4 val4 foo4 bar4
5 val5 foo5 bar5
6 val6 foo6 bar6
7 val7 foo7 bar7
8 val8 foo8 bar8

I want to merge these two dataset, specifying which columns act as key (A and B in my simple case). The expected result is:

A B    XY   ZY   ABC  GH  
- -    --   --   ---  --  
1 val1 foo1 bar1          
2 val2 foo2 bar2          
3 val3 foo3 bar3 foo3 bar3
4 val4 foo4 bar4 foo4 bar4
5 val5 foo5 bar5 foo5 bar5
6 val6 foo6 bar6 foo6 bar6
7 val7           foo7 bar7
8 val8           foo8 bar8

The concept is very similar to a SQL cross join query.

I have been able to successfully write a function that merge objects. Unfortunately, the duration of the computation is exponential.

If I generate my data sets using :

$dsLength = 10
$dataset1 = 0..$dsLength | %{
    New-Object psobject -Property @{ A=$_ ; B="val$_" ; XY = "foo$_"; ZY ="bar$_" }
}
$dataset2 = ($dsLength/2)..($dsLength*1.5) | %{
    New-Object psobject -Property @{ A=$_ ; B="val$_" ; ABC = "foo$_"; GH ="bar$_" }
}

I get these results:

  • $dsLength = 10 ==> 33ms (fine)
  • $dsLength = 100 ==> 89ms (fine)
  • $dsLength = 1000 ==> 1563ms (acceptable)
  • $dsLength = 5000 ==> 35764ms (too much)
  • $dsLength = 10000 ==> 138047ms (too much)
  • $dsLength = 20000 ==> 573614ms (far too much)

How can I merge datasets efficiently when data sets are large (my target is around 20K items) ?

Right now, I have these function defined :

function Merge-Objects{
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object[]]$Dataset1,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object[]]$Dataset2,
        [Parameter()]
        [string[]]$Properties
    )

    $result = @()

    $ds1props = $Dataset1 | gm -MemberType Properties
    $ds2props = $Dataset2 | gm -MemberType Properties
    $ds1propsNotInDs2Props = $ds1props | ? { $_.Name -notin ($ds2props | Select -ExpandProperty Name) }
    $ds2propsNotInDs1Props = $ds2props | ? { $_.Name -notin ($ds1props | Select -ExpandProperty Name) }

    foreach($row1 in $Dataset1){
        $result += $row1
        $ds2propsNotInDs1Props | % {
            $row1 | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $null
        }
    }

    foreach($row2 in $Dataset2){
        $existing = foreach($candidate in $result){
            $match = $true
            foreach($prop in $Properties){
                if(-not ($row2.$prop -eq $candidate.$prop)){
                    $match = $false                   
                    break                  
                }
            }
            if($match){
                $candidate
                break
            }
        }
        if(!$existing){
            $ds1propsNotInDs2Props | % {
                $row2 | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $null
            }
            $result += $row2
        }else{
            $ds2propsNotInDs1Props | % {
                $existing.$($_.Name) = $row2.$($_.Name)
            }

        }
    }

    $result
}

I call these function like this :

Measure-Command -Expression {

    $data = Merge-Objects -Dataset1 $dataset1 -Dataset2 $dataset2 -Properties "A","B" 

}

My feeling is that the slowness is due to the second loop, where I try to match an existing row in each iteration

[Edit] Second approach using a hash as index. Surprisingly, it's event slower than first try

$dsLength = 1000
$dataset1 = 0..$dsLength | %{
    New-Object psobject -Property @{ A=$_ ; B="val$_" ; XY = "foo$_"; ZY ="bar$_" }
}
$dataset2 = ($dsLength/2)..($dsLength*1.5) | %{
    New-Object psobject -Property @{ A=$_ ; B="val$_" ; ABC = "foo$_"; GH ="bar$_" }
}

function Get-Hash{
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object]$InputObject,
        [Parameter()]
        [string[]]$Properties    
    )

    $InputObject | Select-object $properties | Out-String
}


function Merge-Objects{
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object[]]$Dataset1,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object[]]$Dataset2,
        [Parameter()]
        [string[]]$Properties
    )

    $result = @()
    $index = @{}

    $ds1props = $Dataset1 | gm -MemberType Properties
    $ds2props = $Dataset2 | gm -MemberType Properties
    $allProps = $ds1props + $ds2props | select -Unique

    $ds1propsNotInDs2Props = $ds1props | ? { $_.Name -notin ($ds2props | Select -ExpandProperty Name) }
    $ds2propsNotInDs1Props = $ds2props | ? { $_.Name -notin ($ds1props | Select -ExpandProperty Name) }

    $ds1index = @{}

    foreach($row1 in $Dataset1){
        $tempObject = new-object psobject
        $result += $tempObject
        $ds2propsNotInDs1Props | % {
            $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $null
        }
        $ds1props | % {
            $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $row1.$($_.Name)
        }

        $hash1 = Get-Hash -InputObject $row1 -Properties $Properties
        $ds1index.Add($hash1, $tempObject)

    }

    foreach($row2 in $Dataset2){
        $hash2 = Get-Hash -InputObject $row2 -Properties $Properties

        if($ds1index.ContainsKey($hash2)){
            # merge object
            $existing = $ds1index[$hash2]
            $ds2propsNotInDs1Props | % {
                $existing.$($_.Name) = $row2.$($_.Name)
            }
            $ds1index.Remove($hash2)

        }else{
            # add object
            $tempObject = new-object psobject
            $ds1propsNotInDs2Props | % {
                $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $null
            }
            $ds2props | % {
                $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $row2.$($_.Name)
            }
            $result += $tempObject
        }
    }

    $result
}

Measure-Command -Expression {

    $data = Merge-Objects -Dataset1 $dataset1 -Dataset2 $dataset2 -Properties "A","B" 

}

[Edit2] Putting Measure-Commands around the two loops show that event the first loop is yet slow. Actually the first loop take more than 50% of the total time

  • 1
    I would have suggested using hashtables when combining your objects. Have a look at Join-Object – Matt Dec 6 at 16:48
  • Are A and B both unique keys, or either A or B could be used? In your sample, they are the same. Could you have "1 val1" and "1 val1prime" in your two objects? – Kory Gill Dec 6 at 18:30
  • @KoryGill: A and B are composing the key. Both have to match – Steve B Dec 6 at 19:58
  • Interesting - I assume you mean it is slower even with large datasets (e.g. 20k rows)? – mhhollomon Dec 7 at 10:58

I agree with @Matt. Use a hashtable -- something like the below. This should run in m + 2n rather than mn time.

Timings on my system

original Solution above

#10    TotalSeconds      :   0.07788
#100   TotalSeconds      :   0.37937
#1000  TotalSeconds      :   5.25092
#10000 TotalSeconds      : 242.82018
#20000 TotalSeconds      : 906.01584

This definitely looks O(n^2)

Solution Below

#10    TotalSeconds      :  0.094
#100   TotalSeconds      :  0.425
#1000  TotalSeconds      :  3.757
#10000 TotalSeconds      : 45.652
#20000 TotalSeconds      : 92.918

This looks linear.

Solution

I used three techniques to increase the speed:

  1. Change over to a hashtable. This allows constant time lookups so that you don't have to have nested loops. This is the only change really needed to go from O(n^2) to linear time. It does have the disadvantage that there is more setup work done. So, the advantage of linear time won't be seen until the loop count is large enough to pay for the setup.
  2. Use ArrayList instead of a native array. Adding an item to a native array requires that the array be reallocated and all the items to be copied. So this is also an O(n^2) operation. Since this operation is being done at the engine level, the constant is very small, so it really won't make a difference until much later.
  3. Use PsObject.Copy to create the new object. This is a small optimization compared to the other two, but it cut the run time in half for me.

--

function Get-Hash{
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object]$InputObject,
        [Parameter()]
        [string[]]$Properties    
    )

    $arr = [System.Collections.ArrayList]::new()

    foreach($p in $Properties) { $arr += $InputObject.$($p) }

    return ( $arr -join ':' )
}

function Merge-Objects{
    param(
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object[]]$Dataset1,
        [Parameter(Mandatory=$true)]
        [object[]]$Dataset2,
        [Parameter()]
        [string[]]$Properties
    )

    $results = [System.Collections.ArrayList]::new()

    $ds1props = $Dataset1 | gm -MemberType Properties
    $ds2props = $Dataset2 | gm -MemberType Properties
    $ds1propsNotInDs2Props = $ds1props | ? { $_.Name -notin ($ds2props | Select -ExpandProperty Name) }
    $ds2propsNotInDs1Props = $ds2props | ? { $_.Name -notin ($ds1props | Select -ExpandProperty Name) }


    $hash = @{}
    $Dataset2 | % { $hash.Add( (Get-Hash $_ $Properties), $_) }

    foreach ($row in $dataset1) {

        $key = Get-Hash $row $Properties

        $tempObject = $row.PSObject.Copy()

        if ($hash.containskey($key)) {
            $r2 = $hash[$key]

            $hash.remove($key)
            $ds2propsNotInDs1Props | % {
                $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $r2.$($_.Name)
            }

        } else {
            $ds2propsNotInDs1Props | % {
                $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $null
            }
        }
        [void]$results.Add($tempObject)
    }

    foreach ($row in $hash.values ) {
        # add missing dataset2 objects and extend
        $tempObject = $row.PSObject.Copy()

        $ds1propsNotInDs2Props | % {
            $tempObject | Add-Member -MemberType $_.MemberType -Name $_.Name -Value $null
        }

        [void]$results.Add($tempObject)
    }

    $results
}

########

$dsLength = 10000
$dataset1 = 0..$dsLength | %{
    New-Object psobject -Property @{ A=$_ ; B="val$_" ; XY = "foo$_"; ZY ="bar$_" }
}
$dataset2 = ($dsLength/2)..($dsLength*1.5) | %{
    New-Object psobject -Property @{ A=$_ ; B="val$_" ; ABC = "foo$_"; GH ="bar$_" }
}

Measure-Command -Expression {

    $data = Merge-Objects -Dataset1 $dataset1 -Dataset2 $dataset2 -Properties "A","B" 

}
  • thanks for your answer. Just have to change the hash generation because the Select-Object -join do not return a string. I used $InputObject | Select-object $properties | Out-String to ensure the output is a string. Unfortunately, the method is slower than the first try (the question has been updated to reflect the try) – Steve B Dec 7 at 9:04
  • @SteveB - I'm glad it was helpful - but why do you keep using objects rather than just a hashtable? I'm not sure what that buys you? and all the cmdlet calls rather than just hash access is eating time. – mhhollomon Dec 7 at 10:13
  • I don't get your point. I use objects for each merged rows. My actual data are closed business objects from 3rd party library. If I don't build a new object, it would change the input object (because it's reference, not copy) – Steve B Dec 7 at 10:27
  • Sorry, you're right. I skimmed your new code too quickly. – mhhollomon Dec 7 at 10:49

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