How would I return false from accessSync when it fails to find a file/dir instead of ENOENT?

unit test

it.only('should be able to read a file stream only if a file exist', function() {
    let testfile = testpath+'/imageeee.png';
    let ok = FileService.existsAsync(testfile);

    ok = ok.then((result) => {
      console.log('exists: ', result);
      return FileService.createReadStream(testfile);
    });

    ok = ok.then((result) => {
      assert.isNotNull(result.path);
      assert.equal(result.path, testfile);
      assert.isTrue(result.readable, true);
    });
    return ok;
  });

function

 existsAsync(path) {
    let ok = fs.accessAsync(path, fs.F_OK);
    ok = ok.then(function(error) {
      if (error) {
        return false;
      } else {
        return true;
      }
    });
    return ok;
  },

error

 Error: ENOENT: no such file or directory, access '/home/j/Work/imageeee.png'

Anything that throws an error can be wrapped in a try...catch block to capture the error and proceed from there. If this is the problem function here:

fs.accessAsync(path, fs.F_OK);

Wrap it in a try catch and return false in the error case:

try {
    fs.accessAsync(path, fs.F_OK);
    // ... other code
    return true;
} catch(e) {
    // log the error ?
    return false;
}
  • that does not work in this case because it is not promisified. the error returned from this code is ok.then is not a function – asus Dec 6 at 21:20

the solution is to:

1) Promisify the method that calls accessAsync

2) resolve the error if there is one instead of rejecting it

This will still return the error if the result is false but it will not break the promise chain. In order to return false you can simply do resolve(false) but I found it more useful to actual return the error and handle it in my test.

modified code:

existsAsync(path) {
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
      return fs.accessAsync(path, fs.F_OK, (err, data) => {
        if (err) {
          resolve(err);
        } else {
          resolve(true);
        }
      });   
    });
  },

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