I'm trying to run n threads at the same time. Every thread should sum different array and update the global value.

Unfortunately the global value is updated incorrectly.

I don't want to use thread.join().

This is my code so far:

public class myClass {
private static class Values {
    private static double sum;

    public synchronized static void add(double dd) {
        sum += dd;
    };
    public synchronized double get() {
        return sum;
    }
}


public static double CreateThreads(double[] array) {
    final Values values = new Values();

    ...
    ...
    ...


    Thread[] threads = new Thread[nOP];

    for (int i = 0; i<threads.length; i++) {


        threads[i] = new Thread(new Runnable() {

            public void run() {

                    Values.add(sum(tab));

            }

        });
        threads[i].start();

    }

    return values.get();
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
    double[] arr = createArray(4);
    double sumLogg = CreateThreads(arr);

    System.out.println("\n\nSum: " + sumLogg);      
}

Any ideas?

  • Hm I just noticed you do not want to use .join(), why's that? – Mark Dec 6 at 17:36
  • 2
    In addition to the answer you got: you're not synchronizing the reads and the writes on the same lock: one is synchronized on Values.class, and one is synchronized on the Values instance created in the CreateThreads method (which violates naming conventions, BTW). If you don't understand the difference between static and instance fields, you should learn that before using threads. – JB Nizet Dec 6 at 17:38
  • Values.get should also probably be static. But you are creating an instance of Values class. @ruan either go all static or all with a single instance. – Teddy Dec 6 at 17:40
  • 1
    you don't want to use join, then you must use some other way to wait for the Threads to finish (e.g. CountDownLatch, Semaphore, ForkJoinTask, ...) . the way you are doing it now probably the result is being read before any thread has a chance to run. And why are sum and add() static? – Carlos Heuberger Dec 6 at 17:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

In your code you're starting the threads with threads[i].start(); but you're never waiting on them to finish executing with a .join() call. This might cause your method to return a value before all your threads have finished executing, causing it to return a value that's incorrect.

To fix this add something like this before returning the value:

for(Thread t : threads) {
    t.join();
}
  • I don't want to use join() – ruan Dec 6 at 17:36
  • 2
    Wondering why OP says he doesn't want to use join. It's a good way to wait for the threads to end. – Teddy Dec 6 at 17:36
  • @Teddy it it the most efficient solution to use join() – ruan Dec 6 at 17:39
  • Yes, if you want to hold "printing the answer" until all threads have done their summing, then yes, join works. I don't know if there is any other good way. Maybe you can wait in a while loop until the number of threads which completed the operation is equal to total threads. – Teddy Dec 6 at 17:45
  • It might be interesting to check and see how ExecutorService.shutdownNow works. Maybe they use countdown latch? – Teddy Dec 6 at 17:48

If you dont want to use Thread.join you can use CountDountLatch:

    CountDownLatch cdl = new CountDownLatch(nOP);
    Thread[] threads = new Thread[nOP];
    for (int i = 0; i<threads.length; i++) {
        threads[i] = new Thread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                values.add(sum(tab));
                cdl.countDown();
            }
        });
        threads[i].start();
    }
    cdl.await();

In this case you dont need to use additional synchronization, CountDownLatch is a synchronzier (see java.util.concurrent package description) and according to its javadoc "Until the count reaches zero, actions in a thread prior to calling countDown() happen-before actions following a successful return from a corresponding await() in another thread."

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