I have a hierarchy and I want to configure it in one class. Is it possible?

Currently I have N implementations for IEntityTypeConfiguration<> interface - one per each entity in the hierarchy.

  • What do you mean by "hierarchy"? Base/derived entities (inheritance) or something else? – Ivan Stoev Dec 6 at 17:44
  • Exactly. Inheritance. – Pavel Voronin Dec 6 at 19:05
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Sure it is possible. After all, you are not forced to use IEntityTypeConfiguration<> at all - you can configure all your entities inside OnModelCreating. Also all the ApplyConfiguration generic method does is to call Configure method of the class implementing the IEntityTypeConfiguration<TEntity> interface passing EntityTypeBuilder<TEntity> instance which you normally get from modelBuilder.Entity<TEntity>() call (or receive as an argument of the Action<> of the second overload of that method).

Hence you can put your code in any static or instance class method receiving the ModelBuilder instance. If you want to use class, it shouldn't implement IEntityTypeConfiguration<> because there is no way to get ModelBuilder from ``EntityTypeBuilder`, and you need it in order to be able to configure both base and derived entities.

For instance, something like this:

class MyHierarchyConfiguration
{
    public void Apply(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<MyBaseEntity>(builder =>
        {
            // base entity configuration here
        });
        modelBuilder.Entity<MyDerivedEntity1>(builder =>
        {
            // derived entity configuration here
        });
        modelBuilder.Entity<MyDerivedEntity2>(builder =>
        {
            // derived entity configuration here
        });
        // etc.
    }
}

and inside OnModelCreating:

new MyHierarchyConfiguration().Apply(modelBuilder);
  • This is sure a working solution, but maybe it’s worth accepting modelBuilder in constructor and then wrapping it with class/interface exposing API which constraints the types just to hierarchy. On one hand it is an overkill, on the other hand it is a clear expression of intention - configuring the hierarchy. – Pavel Voronin Dec 7 at 7:52
  • Since it is encapsulating all the configuration code, I don't see how you can constrain it or provide API. In fact this approach is not constrained to hierarchies - it can be used to encapsulate fluent configuration of any set of (related) entities. If the intent is just to share common base configuration, then the solution is different - generic base configuration class (MyEntityConfiguration<TEntity> where TEntity : BaseEntity) and derived configuration classes for each derived entity inheriting it (to configure the specific aspects). But that's not "one class" solution. – Ivan Stoev Dec 7 at 8:12
  • And I didn't use constructor / class state because I wanted to indicate the stateless nature of the configuration - the Apply method can be made static, or the class could be made singleton. DI cannot be used to resolve ModelBuilder instance (it's an argument of OnConfiguring), so no real benefit of using constructor/state. Just a shared piece of code moved out from the DbContext. – Ivan Stoev Dec 7 at 8:21
  • But generic version allows us to define the base class. abstract class ConfigureHierarcy<TBase>. Implementors have to override Configure which accepts “special” builder which constraints types of configured entities to inheritors of TBase. – Pavel Voronin Dec 7 at 8:29
  • Yes, it does. But note that it must be called with the actual class, in other words, for each derived class. It's more suitable for hierarchies which don't use EF inheritance - just base classes. If that's what you asked, the answer would be different - for instance stackoverflow.com/questions/49990365/… – Ivan Stoev Dec 7 at 8:38

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