I have a loop that goes over an array of data plotData. Out of plotData I build another array called visiblePoints. Then I loop over visiblePoints to build an object thisRow, then I add thisRow to an array outside of the loop, called dataArray:

var dataArray = []

for (i = 0; i < plotData.length; i++) {

    // This filters datapoints array into another array
    var visiblePoints = filterPoints(plotData[i].datapoints)

    // Get the string for the thisRow object key name 
    var selectedParameter = plotData[i].label

    for (k = 0; k < visiblePoints.length; k++) {
        // Convert visiblePoint first value from ms to date
        var timestamp = new Date(visiblePoints[k][0])

        // Form the thisRow object that will go into dataArray
        // for each loop of visiblePoints
        var thisRow = {}
        thisRow["Time"] = msToTime(timestamp)
        thisRow[selectedParameter] = visiblePoints[k][1]
        dataArray.push(thisRow)
    }
}

Let's simplify and say I only have 2 element in sub array visisblePoints for each plotData array, like so (each plotData array can have many visiblePoints but I'm simplifying to just 2 for each):

plotData[0].visiblePoints = [[00:00:01, 1], [00:00:02, 4] ...]
plotData[1].visiblePoints = [[00:00:01, 27], [00:00:02, 31] ...]

plotData looks like this on the console:

enter image description here

The visiblePoints array for the k loop is derived off of plotData.datapoints and looks like:

enter image description here

Where visiblePoints[n][0] is a value in ms (that I convert into seconds) and visiblePoints[n][1] is just a float value.

visiblePoints = 
[0, 0.0500466109191]
[100, 0.0548114598135]
[200, 0.0550143573252]
[300, 0.0549408536766]
[400, 0.0546117305419]
[... repeat 300+ times...]

After looping over plotData[i] and visiblePoints[k] I end up with:

dataArray = [
    {
        "Time": 00:00:01,
        "foo": 1
    },
    {
        "Time": 00:00:01,
        "bar": 27
    },
    {
        "Time": 00:00:02,
        "foo": 4
    },
    {
        "Time": 00:00:02,
        "bar": 31
    },
]

When I had meant to end up with:

dataArray = [
    {
        "Time": 00:00:01,
        "foo": 1,
        "bar": 27
    },
    {
        "Time": 00:00:02,
        "foo": 4,
        "bar": 31
    }
]

I think in loop k I need to go over dataArray, check all objects there to see if there is a Time key that matches thisRow["Time"] = msToTime(timestamp), and if so, add thisRow[selectedParameter] = visiblePoints[k][1] to that, if not, create a new object.

Problems:

  1. I'm not sure how to check for this in JS (I'm more experience at Python, and not that much at that
  2. It seems like I'm doing a heck of a lot of loops. I'm not sure adding yet another one to go over the entire dataArray and check all objects to see if a key exists in one of them is best solution here. A plotData.visiblePoints array can be 500+ long.

[EDIT] Simplified the question. Added picture examples. Added text examples of the k array.

  • 3
    No one will appreciate the fact that you provided all the details possible. Make it short and focused. – Nurbol Alpysbayev Dec 6 at 17:58
  • 2
    how often do you update the array? – Nina Scholz Dec 6 at 17:59
  • At minimum every 0.5 seconds, this all happens a bit after an event handler is solved – Mormoran Dec 6 at 18:01
  • @NurbolAlpysbayev I tried to make the body explicit to make it clear what my output is and what my desired output should be. Was it too explicit? – Mormoran Dec 6 at 18:02
  • 2
    @Mormoran -- it would make the question easier to answer if you included a sample of what plotData looked like. It seems like it's an array of objects with label and visiblePoints properties. Is that right? – Mark Meyer Dec 6 at 18:06

You can build an object keyed to the grouping — in this case the timestamp. This will let you randomly access the item you want without searching the array. When you'r done the Object.values of the object will be an array of your grouped objects:

let plotData = [
    {
        label: 'foo',
        visiblePoints: [[`00:00:01`, 1], [`00:00:02`, 4]]
    },
    {
        label: 'bar',
        visiblePoints: [[`00:00:01`, 27], [`00:00:02`, 31]]
    }
]

let groups = plotData.reduce((obj, {label, visiblePoints}) => {
    visiblePoints.forEach(([time, val]) => {
        if(!obj[time]) obj[time] = {Time: time}  // if we haven't seen this time make a new object at that key
        obj[time][label] = val
    })
    return obj
},   {})
console.log(Object.values(groups))

  • 1
    I'm trying to adapt your snippet to my code, give me a second. Your seems the most efficient, as I don't want to loop over this too much. Also added more examples. But running your snippet here seems to do exactly what I meant to do at first. – Mormoran Dec 6 at 18:24

You could take a Map or a hash table which keeps the reference to the object with the same time.

var map = new Map,
    timestamp,
    row;

// later in loop
timestamp = msToTime(new Date(visiblePoints[k][0]));
row = map.get(timestamp);
if (!row) {
    map.set(timestamp, row = { Time: timestamp });
}
row[selectedParameter] = visiblePoints[k][1];

// at the end assign the array
dataArray = Array.from(map.values())
  • Where in the loop would I add your map conditional? I think doing it this way would be more efficient but I'm not sure what it is you're doing there (as I mentioned, I'm not very experienced with JS, certainly not this advanced) – Mormoran Dec 6 at 21:28
  • it is the most inner loop with k as variable. – Nina Scholz Dec 6 at 21:32

You could find if an Object has a specific key by calling hasOwnProperty method.

const obj = {
  "bar": [1,2,3],
  "foo": "im foo"
};

console.log(obj.hasOwnProperty("bar"))
console.log(obj.hasOwnProperty("bar2"))

And you need to follow this pattern.

var dataArray = []

for (i = 0; i < 1; i++) {

    for (k = 0; k < 2; k++) {
    
        thisRow = {};
        thisRow["Time"] = k+1 * i+1
        thisRow["foo"] = i+1
        thisRow["var"] = k+1
        dataArray.push(thisRow)
    }
}

console.log(dataArray)

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.