I'm writing an interpreter program in Java which takes a string which represents an instruction set to assign variables and returns the variable displayed on the last line. So

A = 2
B = 4
C = A + B
C

when fed into the code, it should return 6, which is the value of C. I have the following code so far:

public class Interpreter2 {

public static int Scanner() {
    int returnStatement = 0;
    //Input instruction set in the quotation marks below
    String input = "A = 2\n B = 8\n C = A + B\n C";
    String[] lines = input.split("\n");
    for (String i : lines) {
        i = i.replaceAll("\\s", "");
        if (i.contains("=")) {
            String[] sides = i.split("=");
            String leftHand = sides[0];
            String rightHand = sides[1];
            int a = Integer.parseInt(leftHand);

            if (rightHand.contains("+")) {
                String[] add = rightHand.split("+");
                String num1 = add[0];
                String num2 = add[1];
                int num3 = Integer.parseInt(num1);
                int num4 = Integer.parseInt(num2);
                int sum = num3 + num4;
                a = sum;

            }else {
                int b = Integer.parseInt(rightHand);
                a += b;
                return a;
            }
        }else {
            returnStatement = Integer.parseInt(i);
            return returnStatement;
        }

    }
    return returnStatement;

}


public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(Scanner());
    }
}

Currently however this returns

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "A"

Which means that if there is a letter in the instruction set, it will not work. If int a is simply assigned as 0, the code returns 2. Does anyone know how I can fix this?

  • When you parse A=2, you take LHS and RHS in a split. But then you try to parseInt on LHS, which would be A, which is not an integer. – KevinO Dec 6 at 19:01
  • Before you begin coding a solution to this problem, you should spend some time defining your problem domain (i.e. state the rules, assumptions, and constraints for your interpreter; determine its grammar and syntax). Then, you should develop a corresponding object model. As it stands, your solution is procedurally written and does not benefit from any sort of object oriented abstraction. – scottb Dec 6 at 21:26

Here

int a = Integer.parseInt(leftHand);

you have getting a value "A" so you won't be able to parse it to integer.

You have in your code:

String[] sides = i.split("=");
String leftHand = sides[0];
String rightHand = sides[1];
int a = Integer.parseInt(leftHand);

However in your String:

A = 2

The String A will be the left have side. Then you try to parse it to an Integer, which will not work. You should be storing the left hand side into a String.

How I would recommend doing this is using a Map, with the variable name as the key, and the number as the value. This way when you need to add variables based on their name you can to something along the lines of:

To add the variables:

Map<String, Integer> variables = new HashMap<>();
String[] sides = i.split("=");
variables.put(sides[0], Integer.parseInt(sides[1]));

And then why you need to get the values:

yourMap.get(variable1) + yourMap.get(variable2)

Where variable1 is your first String representing A in your example, and variable2 is your second String representing B. However this is only for simple equations such as A = 2. For such equations as A = B + 2, you will need to use Character.isDigit to determine whether or not the character you are parsing is a digit or a variable. Also instead of splitting on = and then again on + you split on both:

public static int foo() {
    Map<String, Integer> variables = new HashMap<>(); 
    int sum = 0;
    String input = "A = 2\n B = 8\n C = A + B\n C";
    String[] lines = input.split("\n");
    for (String str : lines) {
        str = str.replaceAll("\\s", "");
        if (str.contains("=")) {
            String[] sides = str.split("=|\\+");
            for(int i = 1; i < sides.length; i++) {
                System.out.println(sides[i]);
                if(Character.isDigit(sides[i].charAt(0))) {
                   variables.put(sides[0], Integer.parseInt(sides[i]));
                } else {
                   sum += variables.get(sides[i]);
                }
            }

        }

    }
    return sum;
}
  • Could you give me an example of how to use map? – kotsoteka Dec 6 at 19:25
  • @kotsoteka I added something to get you started with it. I also linked the docs to Map, so you can read about it there – GBlodgett Dec 6 at 19:29
  • Thank you. Will this work in the instance where the right hand side is a string? – kotsoteka Dec 6 at 19:33
  • @kotsoteka No, this would not work if it was reverse like 2 = A. Is that a possibility? – GBlodgett Dec 6 at 19:35
  • No, the left side should always be a letter, but the right hand can be a letter or a combination of letters and numbers like B = A + 5 – kotsoteka Dec 6 at 19:37

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