So, I have to transform a char* to my own struct SList, which is just a list of words from the former array (separated with spaces), then to create an ostream << operator for it

but here is the output:

8° └
8°
8° └
8

what is wrong? Also all output elements seem to be the same, just with different length

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Word {
    int size;
    char *symbols;
};

struct SList {
    int size;
    Word *myArray;
};

SList third(char *words, int size, size_t n) {
    int indexOfMyArray = 0;
    int index = 0;
    Word *myArray = new Word[size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        char *word = new char[n];
        int k = 0;
        while (words[index] >= 'a' && words[index] <= 'z') {
            word[k] = words[index];
            k++;
            index++;
        }
        word[k] = '\0';
        index++;
        Word word1 = {k, word};
        myArray[indexOfMyArray] = word1;
        indexOfMyArray++;
        cout << word << ' ';
        for (int k = 0; k < word1.size; k++)
            cout << word1.symbols[k];
        cout << endl;
        delete[](word);
    }
    cout << endl;
    SList list = {size, myArray};
    return list;
}

ostream &operator<<(ostream &os, const SList &list) {
    for (int i = 0; i < list.size; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < list.myArray[i].size; j++) {
            os << static_cast<char>(list.myArray[i].symbols[j]+0);
        }
        os << endl;
    }
    return os;
}

int main() {

    char chars[19] = {'e', 'z', 'e', 's', 'c', ' ', 'e', 'f', 't', ' ', 'y', 'y', 'y', 'y', 'y', 'y', ' ', 'f', 'h'};
    SList list = third(chars, 4, 19);
    cout << list << endl;

    system("pause");
}
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  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! It sounds like you may need to learn how to use a debugger to step through your code. With a good debugger, you can execute your program line by line and see where it is deviating from what you expect. This is an essential tool if you are going to do any programming. Further reading: How to debug small programs and Debugging Guide – NathanOliver Dec 6 at 21:11
  • You've deleted all the words your array tries to points to. – François Andrieux Dec 6 at 21:14
  • 2
    Why not simply use std::vector<std::string> and std::istringstream? If this is being taught as the way to do things in C++, no wonder students drop C++ as soon as they're done with the course. This is actually a 6 or so line program, if C++ was being used effectively. – PaulMcKenzie Dec 6 at 21:17
  • 1
    @АндрейСахаров It's needed after you're done with the object (before the last pointer to it is destroyed at the latest). But you aren't done with the object. Though if you use std::string instead of char* you won't have these problems. – François Andrieux Dec 6 at 21:20
  • 2
    @АндрейСахаров -- it's too simple for him -- Why do teachers believe that using std::string will magically write the program for the student? You still have to write the logic. I bet if the teacher stated to use std::string, the same students having trouble with char* would have the same trouble with std::string, but in a different aspect of the program. Also, one of the goals of C++, at least according to the inventor of the language, is to reduce bugs by using higher level constructs, not to make things harder. – PaulMcKenzie Dec 6 at 21:45

As indicated in comments, using the C++ types makes the problem much better readable and understandable.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

using Word = std:: string;
using SList = std::vector<Word>;

SList third(std::string const &words) {
    SList myArray;
     int index = 0;
    while (index < words.size()) {
        Word word;
        while (words[index] >= 'a' && words[index] <= 'z') {
            word += words[index];
            index++;
       }   
       myArray.push_back( word);
        cout << word << ' ' << myArray.back() << std::endl;
    }
    cout << endl;
    return myArray;
}

// I believe this operator is actually undefined behavior as you ain't allowed to write this method for standard types.
ostream &operator<<(ostream &os, const SList &list)
    {
   for (auto &&word : list)
          os << word << std::endl;
    return os;
    }

int main() {

    std::string chars {"ezesc eft yyyyyy fh"};
    SList list = third(chars);
    cout << list << endl;

    system("pause");
}

The above fixes your issue as memory management is suddenly hidden from you. That is a good thing!

Within your code: the problem lies within: delete[](word); the memory of word is still referred to by the pointer you stored. So when accessing that memory, you have undefined behavior and the result is not so nice. You have been unlucky it didn't crash.

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