I have a pandas dataframe of the form:

df

    ID    col_1    col_2    col_3    Date
     1              20       40      1/1/2018
     1     10                        1/2/2018
     1     50                60      1/3/2018
     3     40       10       90      1/1/2018
     4              80       80      1/1/2018

The problem is, I need to create a new dataframe with the first valid values for each column BUT also additional columns derived from 'Date', which correspond to the time those values were matched by in the original dataframe.

In other words:

new_df

    ID    first_col_1    Date_col_1    first_col_2    Date_col_2    first_col_3    Date_col_3
    1         10          1/2/2018          20         1/1/2018         40         1/1/2018 
    3         40          1/1/2018          10         1/1/2018         90         1/1/2018 
    4                     1/1/2018          80         1/1/2018         80         1/1/2018

I understand getting the first valid value per column per ID is as simple as

df.groupby('ID').first()

But how do I extract the relevant 'Date' information for each column?

  • Where did the 50 from the 1st column, the 80 in the 2nd and the 60 and 80 values go? They are not present in the new DF. – pookie Dec 7 at 12:24
  • Thanks for the interest. That's the point- we need the first values of every unique ID. – Melsauce Dec 7 at 19:49
  • @Melsause But if you look at ID 4, the first value of the unique ID 4 is 80, yet you have it as 20 in your new_df example. – pookie Dec 7 at 23:17
  • Corrected, @pookie. Thanks. – Melsauce yesterday
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't need to loop, but you do need to "melt" your dataframe before your group-by operation.

So starting with:

from io import StringIO
import pandas
f = StringIO("""\
ID,col_1,col_2,col_3,Date
1,,20,40,1/1/2018
1,10,,,1/2/2018
1,50,,60,1/3/2018
3,40,10,90,1/1/2018
4,,80,80,1/1/2018
""")

df = pandas.read_csv(f)

You can then:

print(
    df.melt(id_vars=['ID', 'Date'], value_vars=['col_1', 'col_2', 'col_3'], value_name='first')
      .groupby(by=['ID', 'variable'])
      .first()
      .unstack(level='variable')
)

Which gives you:

              Date                     first            
variable     col_1     col_2     col_3 col_1 col_2 col_3
ID                                                      
1         1/1/2018  1/1/2018  1/1/2018  10.0  20.0  40.0
3         1/1/2018  1/1/2018  1/1/2018  40.0  10.0  90.0
4         1/1/2018  1/1/2018  1/1/2018   NaN  80.0  80.0

The columns are multi-level, so you we can put some polish on them if you want:

def flatten_columns(df, sep='_'):
    newcols = [sep.join(_) for _ in df.columns]
    return df.set_axis(newcols, axis='columns', inplace=False)

print(
    df.melt(id_vars=['ID', 'Date'], value_vars=['col_1', 'col_2', 'col_3'], value_name='first')
      .groupby(by=['ID', 'variable'])
      .first()
      .unstack(level='variable')
      .sort_index(level='variable', axis='columns')
      .pipe(flatten_columns)
)

Which gives you something with not quite the same column order as your example, but it's as close as I feel like making it.

   Date_col_1  first_col_1 Date_col_2  first_col_2 Date_col_3  first_col_3
ID                                                                        
1    1/1/2018         10.0   1/1/2018         20.0   1/1/2018         40.0
3    1/1/2018         40.0   1/1/2018         10.0   1/1/2018         90.0
4    1/1/2018          NaN   1/1/2018         80.0   1/1/2018         80.0

IIUC using melt before groupby

newdf=df.melt(['ID','Date']).loc[lambda x : x.value!='']

newdf=  newdf.groupby(['ID','variable']).first().unstack().sort_index(level=1,axis=1)

newdf.columns=newdf.columns.map('_'.join)
newdf
   Date_col_1  value_col_1 Date_col_2  value_col_2 Date_col_3  value_col_3
ID                                                                        
1    1/2/2018         10.0   1/1/2018         20.0   1/1/2018         40.0
3    1/1/2018         40.0   1/1/2018         10.0   1/1/2018         90.0
4        None          NaN   1/1/2018         80.0   1/1/2018         80.0
  • Is 'variable' a buffer column? – Melsauce Dec 7 at 1:36
  • @Melsauce it is the default name by melt – W-B Dec 7 at 1:51

I think you have to loop over the columns, and extract the first values for each of them before concatenating. I can't see a simpler way to do that.

# Create a list to store the dataframes you want for each column
sub_df = [pd.DataFrame(df['ID'].unique(), columns=['ID'])]  # Init this list with IDs

for col in df.columns[1:-1]:  # loop over the columns (except ID and Date)

    # Determine the first valid rows indexes for this column (group by ID)
    valid_rows = df.groupby('ID')[col].apply(lambda sub_df: sub_df.first_valid_index())

    # Extracting the values and dates corresponding to these rows
    new_sub_df = df[[col, 'Date']].ix[valid_rows].reset_index(drop=True)

    # Append to the list of sub DataFrames
    sub_df.append(new_sub_df)

# Concatenate all these DataFrames.
new_df = pd.concat(sub_df, axis=1)

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