3

I was wondering if it's possible to access a value inside a nested object with just one string. Supose I have an object like this:

skill: {
    skillDetails: {
        developerDetails: {
            developerName: "mr. developer"
        }
    }
}

Is there a way I can do something like this, to get the value via a "JSON path": skill["skillDetails.developerDetails.developerName"] ?

The reason I ask this is because I'm trying to pass the key & object into a function (that I can't modify) that essentially returns object[key]

not sure if this possible so I thought I'd ask you guys for some advice.

Thanks!

  • I've just answered a similar question, check it out and adapt the answer to your needs (the inner function is what you're looking for). – ibrahim mahrir Dec 7 '18 at 0:45
2

There is no "built in" method, however a simple solution to this (that doesn't require a third party library) can be achieved via split() and reduce() as follows:

var skill = {
  skillDetails: {
    developerDetails: {
      developerName: "mr. developer"
    }
  }
}

var path = "skillDetails.developerDetails.developerName";

var value = path
.split('.') // Split path into parts by '.'
.reduce((obj, part) => obj ? obj[part] : undefined, skill); // Extract value via reduction

console.log(value)

2

Unfortunately there's no quick built-in method to accomplish this -- you'll need a helper function.

lodash supports this using _.get(obj, property).

From the docs:

var object = { 'a': [{ 'b': { 'c': 3 } }] };

_.get(object, 'a[0].b.c');
// → 3

_.get(object, ['a', '0', 'b', 'c']);
// → 3

_.get(object, 'a.b.c', 'default');
// → 'default'
1

The de facto standard with plain JS is to use Array.reduce since using its accumulator it allows you to keep "walking the path" until you get to the value, but often the use case where on the path you might have a function is ignored. Here is an example:

var obj = {
  foo: {
    bar: {
      fooBar: "BARFOO",
      foo: function() { return { c: 'BAR' }}
    }
  }
}

const get = (obj, path) => path.split('.').reduce((r,c) => {
  return r ? typeof r === 'function' ? r()[c] : r[c] : undefined
}, obj)

console.log(get(obj, 'foo.bar.fooBar'))
console.log(get(obj, 'foo.bar.foo'))
console.log(get(obj, 'foo.bar.foo.c'))

As you can see if you wanted to get the actual value of foo.bar.foo.c you have to go through a function and execute it ... now all this is "skipped" if you ware to utilize _.result from lodash:

var obj = {
  foo: {
    bar: {
      fooBar: "BARFOO",
      foo: function() { return { c: 'BAR' }}
    }
  }
}

console.log(_.result(obj, 'foo.bar.fooBar'))
console.log(_.result(obj, 'foo.bar.foo'))
console.log(_.result(obj, 'foo.bar.foo.c'))
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/lodash.js/4.17.10/lodash.min.js"></script>

Something to keep in mid along with _.get which would only get you values and would not walk through functions and _.has which would return boolean if path is valid or not.

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