Groovy Version: 2.4.5 JVM: 1.8.0_151 Vendor: Oracle Corporation OS: Linux

I have tried two versions of my Groovy program. The class "Example" runs if I have nothing else in the program (e.g., no 'println "Test"').

Why does the Example class not run if I have a "println" statement?

class Example {
   static void main(String[] args) {
      def clos = {println "Hello World"};
      clos.call();
   }
}

println "Test"

I expect the above program to print this when it is run:

Hello World

Test

Why does the class not execute when there is another line outside of it?

migrated from superuser.com Dec 7 at 2:12

This question came from our site for computer enthusiasts and power users.

You need to be aware of a few things. When you create a script (let's call it someScript.groovy) with the following content:

#!groovy

println "Test"

println 21 + 21

it gets compiled to the following class:

//
// Source code recreated from a .class file by IntelliJ IDEA
// (powered by Fernflower decompiler)
//

import groovy.lang.Binding;
import groovy.lang.Script;
import org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.InvokerHelper;

public class someScript extends Script {
    public someScript() {
    }

    public someScript(Binding context) {
        super(context);
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        InvokerHelper.runScript(someScript.class, args);
    }

    public Object run() {
        ((someScript)this).println("Test");
        Object var10000 = null;
        ((someScript)this).println(21 + 21);
        return null;
    }
}

As you can see, the body of the Groovy script is represented as a method run() in the generated class. When we add a class to this script, let's say the Example class from your question, the body of run() method does not change at all - the class gets compiled to an Example.class bytecode file and that's it:

//
// Source code recreated from a .class file by IntelliJ IDEA
// (powered by Fernflower decompiler)
//

import groovy.lang.Closure;
import groovy.lang.GroovyObject;
import groovy.lang.MetaClass;
import org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.DefaultGroovyMethods;
import org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.GeneratedClosure;

public class Example implements GroovyObject {
    public Example() {
        MetaClass var1 = this.$getStaticMetaClass();
        this.metaClass = var1;
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        class _main_closure1 extends Closure implements GeneratedClosure {
            public _main_closure1(Object _outerInstance, Object _thisObject) {
                super(_outerInstance, _thisObject);
            }

            public Object doCall(Object it) {
                DefaultGroovyMethods.println(Example.class, "Hello World");
                return null;
            }

            public Object call(Object args) {
                return this.doCall(args);
            }

            public Object call() {
                return this.doCall((Object)null);
            }

            public Object doCall() {
                return this.doCall((Object)null);
            }
        }

        Closure clos = new _main_closure1(Example.class, Example.class);
        clos.call();
    }
}

When we run Groovy compiler to compile someScript.groovy (groovyc someScript.groovy) and we list generated classes we will see something like this:

ls -lh *.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 2,0K 12-07 10:26  Example.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,6K 12-07 10:26 'Example$_main_closure1.class'
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,4K 12-07 10:26  someScript.class

NOTE: this Example$_main_closure1.class represents a closure used in Example.main() method

Now, let's see what happens if we comment (or remove) println statements from the someScript.groovy file and we compile it:

someScript.groovy

#!groovy

class Example {
    static void main(String[] args) {
        def clos = {println "Hello World"};
        clos.call();
    }
}

//println "Test"
//
//println 21 + 21

Compile time:

> groovyc someScript.groovy

> ls -lh *.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 2,0K 12-07 10:31  Example.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,6K 12-07 10:31 'Example$_main_closure1.class'

As you can see, there is no someScript.class class file generated. It happens because the script file we just compiled does not contain any body, but it has the Example class inside. When you run such script Groovy tries to locate the first static main() method to execute it - that is why running the following script produces Hello World output:

> groovy someScript.groovy 
Hello World

Let's go further and add another class on top of the someScript.groovy file:

someScript.groovy

#!groovy 

class Foo {
    static void main(String[] args) {
        println "Bar"
    }
}


class Example {
    static void main(String[] args) {
        def clos = {println "Hello World"};
        clos.call();
    }
}

//println "Test"
//
//println 21 + 21

The body of the script is still commented out. Let's compile and see what class files get generated:

> groovyc someScript.groovy

> ls -lh *.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 2,0K 12-07 10:35  Example.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,6K 12-07 10:35 'Example$_main_closure1.class'
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,8K 12-07 10:35  Foo.class

We can see 3 class files, just as expected. Let's see what happens if we run the script with groovy command:

> groovy someScript.groovy                             
Bar

Now as you can see the Foo.main() method got executed because Groovy located this method on top of the script file and it assumed that this is the main method we want to run.

Let's finalize this with the example containing two classes and script body:

someScript.groovy

#!groovy

class Foo {
    static void main(String[] args) {
        println "Bar"
    }
}


class Example {
    static void main(String[] args) {
        def clos = {println "Hello World"};
        clos.call();
    }
}

println "Test"

println 21 + 21

Compile time:

> groovyc someScript.groovy

> ls -lh *.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 2,0K 12-07 10:39  Example.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,6K 12-07 10:39 'Example$_main_closure1.class'
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,8K 12-07 10:39  Foo.class
-rw-rw-r--. 1 wololock wololock 1,4K 12-07 10:39  someScript.class

This time a class someScript got generated because the script body is not empty. Last look at the generated someScript.class file:

//
// Source code recreated from a .class file by IntelliJ IDEA
// (powered by Fernflower decompiler)
//

import groovy.lang.Binding;
import groovy.lang.Script;
import org.codehaus.groovy.runtime.InvokerHelper;

public class someScript extends Script {
    public someScript() {
    }

    public someScript(Binding context) {
        super(context);
    }

    public static void main(String... args) {
        InvokerHelper.runScript(someScript.class, args);
    }

    public Object run() {
        ((someScript)this).println("Test");
        Object var10000 = null;
        ((someScript)this).println(21 + 21);
        return null;
    }
}

As you can see it didn't change compared to our first example (when there were no classes inside the script, but only two println statements), so we can't expect anything else than running someScript.run() method to happen. Let's run the script:

> groovy someScript.groovy
Test
42

Conclusion

  • When you create a Groovy script its body gets moved and compiled as scriptName.run() method, and it gets executed.
  • If you add a class with a main() method to a Groovy script and you keep script body, added class main() method won't get executed - it only compiles the class, and you can use it explicitly in your script body if needed.
  • If you add a class with a main() method to a Groovy script and you don't put any script body (any statements/expressions outside the class) then Groovy searches for the first static main() method, and it executes it.

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