I've made a class with T. It looks like this.

public interface ISendLogic<T> where T : NarcoticsResult
{
    ChangeType Change_New();
    ChangeType Change_Cancel();

    PurchaseType Purchase_New();
    PurchaseType Purchase_Cancel();     
}

public class SendLogic<T> : ISendLogic<T> where T : NarcoticsResult
{
    private eReportType _type;

    private bool Send_Change()
    {
        // Send to server by xml file
    }

    private bool Send_Purchase()
    {
        // Send to server by xml file
    }

    public ChangeType Change_New()
    {
        _type = change_new;
        Send_Change();
    }

    public ChangeType Change_Cancel()
    {
        _type = change_cancel;
        Send_Change();
    }

    public PurchaseType Purchase_New()
    {
        _type = purchase_new;
        Send_Purchase();
    }

    public PurchaseType Purchase_Cancel()
    {
        _type = purchase_cancel;
        Send_Purchase();
    }
}

There are two types, ChangeType and PurchaseType

and these are inherited from NarcoticsResult.

I thought the person who want to use this class would use it like this.

// this class can only be used when someone wants to use change function 
var logic = SendLogic<ChangeType >();
logic.Change_New();
logic.Change_Cancel();

Here is a question.

I want to force this class to be used only as I thought.

I mean, I want to prevent it to be used like this.

var logic = SendLogic<ChangeType>();
logic.Change_New(); // OK
logic.Purchase_New(); // You should make this class like SendLogic<PurchaseType>()

I thought I add some code which check type of T in every function.

How do you think the way I thought. I think there are better way to fix it

Please tell me a better way

thank you.

  • Im not sure a generic solution is what you are after here. Why not just break up the logic into change and purchase types that you already have – TheGeneral 2 days ago
  • What is eReportType? Is that an enum? – bcwhims 2 days ago
  • Why expose surface area for each type deriving from NarcoticsResult when instantiating it with one type argument only makes some of that surface area usable? The point of generics is to allow common operations to be done on any type that meets whatever constraints there are. In your case, those operations would be public T New() and public T Cancel() and the constraints would be where T : NarcoticsResult, new(). If that's not possible, meaningful, or sensible, generics aren't the right tool for the job. – madreflection 2 days ago
  • What is the type parameter T for when it isn't referenced anywhere in the definition of ISendLogic<T>? – Lee 2 days ago
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Personally, I don't think you need a generic class in this case. What you need is either an abstract base class or an interface. I personally love the interface approach as below:

public interface ISendLogic {
    void New();
    void Cancel();
}

So now you've got a contract that will force the consumer of your code to use New or Cancel methods only.

The next step you can implement that send logic interface for your specific implementation:

public class ChangeSendLogic : ISendLogic {
    private eReportType _type;

    public ChangeSendLogic(
       /*you can put the necessary parameters in the constructor
         and keep it as private fields in the object*/
    ) 
    {

    }

    private bool Send_Change()
    {
        // Send to server by xml file
    }

    public void New() 
    {
        _type = change_new;
        Send_Change();
    }

    public void Cancel() 
    {
        _type = change_cancel;
        Send_Change();  
    }
}

public class PurchaseSendLogic : ISendLogic {
    private eReportType _type;

    public PurchaseSendLogic(
       /*you can put the necessary parameters in the constructor
         and keep it as private fields in the object*/
    ) 
    {

    }
    private bool Send_Purchase()
    {
        // Send to server by xml file
    }

    public void New() 
    {
        _type = change_new;
        Send_Purchase();
    }

    public void Cancel() 
    {
        _type = change_cancel;
        Send_Purchase();  
    }
}

From here you can see those two classes handle the implementation for each type nicely. You can think this is as an implementation of single responsibility principle. So if you have one more type, you can just add one more implementation of this interface rather than updating the existing classes.

If you want to hide the creation of those objects, in the next part you can introduce a kind of factory or selector as below:

public enum SendLogicType {
    Change,
    Purchase
}

public static SendLogicSelector {
    public static ISendLogic GetSendLogic(SendLogicType type) 
    {
         switch(type)
         {
             case SendLogicType.Change:
                  return new ChangeSendLogic();
             case SendLogicType.Purchase:
                  return new PurchaseSendLogic();
         }
    }
}

This is how the code will be consumed:

ISendLogic sendLogic = SendLogicSelector.GetSendLogic(SendLogicType.Change);
sendLogic.New(); // change new logic executed
sendLogic.Cancel(); // change cancel logic executed

sendLogic = SendLogicSelector.GetSendLogic(SendLogicType.Purchase);
sendLogic.New(); // purchase new logic executed
sendLogic.Cancel(); // purchase cancel logic executed

Hopefully, you can get the idea of my approach. Good luck! :)

Thank you for your comment

I divided it into two parts like below

public class ChangeSendLogic : SendLogic<ChangeType>, IChangeLogic
public class PurchaseSendLogic : SendLogic<PurchaseType>, IPurchaseLogic

And I also divided interface too

 public interface IChangeLogic
 {
     ChangeType Change_New();
     ChangeType Change_Cancel();
 }

 public interface IPurchaseLogic
 {
     PurchaseType Purchase_New();
     PurchaseType Purchase_Cancel();  
 }

And I made SendLogic<T> class to abstract class.

This is because I want to make the person who wants to use this class to use a class that inherits from this class without directly accessing it.

Thank you for your comment. I got a good idea.

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