Why is is necessary to use iostream library while writing a program in C++. If i don't want to include this library, so what is the alternative of this iostream library.

Here is my code without including iostream. I tried to use include stdio.h but it does not work.

#include<conio.h>

using namespace std;

void biodata ();

main()
{
    biodata ();
}

void biodata()
{
    cout << "Name: Ijlal Hussain.\nFather Name: Iftikhar Hussin.\nAge: 18. \nStudent of Comsats University Islamabad (Attock Campus)";
}
  • If you don't want to use iostreams, your alternatives are C-style stdio and low level OS-specific functions like write() or WriteFile(). Oh, and your main() function needs to return int. That compiles without warnings for you? – Shawn 2 days ago
  • In addition to the C-style IO and the OS-specific IO, you can use other libraries (which will in turn use C-style IO, iostreams, or OS-specific IO). – Daniel H 2 days ago
  • Why do you not want to include <iostream>? If you want to use cout etc., you need to include it (or include something which includes it); otherwise the compiler won't know what cout even is. – Daniel H 2 days ago
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot use std::cout without header so use printf instead with cstdio header .

#include<cstdio>
void biodata ();
main()
{
    biodata ();
}
void biodata()
{
    printf("Name: Ijlal Hussain.\nFather Name: Iftikhar Hussin.\nAge: 18. \nStudent of Comsats University Islamabad (Attock Campus)");
}
  • 2
    Using "conio.h" is non-standard and not a good recommendation. – D.Go 2 days ago
  • 1
    @D.Go Even with platforms where conio.h is typical, it doesn't contain printf usually; you should include cstdio for that. – Daniel H 2 days ago
  • @DanielH Yes, so best avoided, either way ;) – D.Go 2 days ago
  • I have corrected mistakes. Thanks @D.Go – Aishwarya Mittal 2 days ago

You can use <cstdio> instead of <iostream>, if you just need to output text.

To print a string without formatting, you can use puts. Use printf to print with format and conversion specifiers.

#include<cstdio>

void biodata ();

int main()
{
  biodata ();
  return 0;
}

void biodata()
{    
   //using puts   
   puts("Name: Ijlal Hussain.\nFather Name: Iftikhar Hussin.\nAge: 18. \nStudent of Comsats University Islamabad (Attock Campus)");

   //using printf
    const char* name = "Ijlal Hussain";
    const char* fathername = "Iftikhar Hussin";
    int age = 18;
    printf("Name: %s.\nFather Name: %s.\nAge: %d. \nStudent of Comsats University Islamabad (Attock Campus)", name, fathername, age);     

}
  • I don't want to use syntax of c. I am writing the program in C++. You suggested code shows my statements twice in output. – Ijlal Hussain 2 days ago
  • 1
    @IjlalHussain P.W. is just showing you two ways of doing the same thing. You can use this example with printf and remove the puts line. – D.Go 2 days ago
  • 1
    @IjlalHussain cout is part of <iostream>. If you aren't going to use <iostream> the you won't have access to it. – D.Go 2 days ago
  • 1
    Furthermore, printf is just as valid in C++ as it is in C. The syntax uses C++ standards and there is nothing about printf that limits it to one language or the other. – D.Go 2 days ago
  • 1
    @IjlalHussain - you certainly do not want to use to 100% non-portable <conio.h>. Your options are somewhat limited, unless you want to write your own I/O lib in assembly. You have <cstdio> or <iostream>, those are the only portable games in town. If you are still using DOS, then <conio.h> – David C. Rankin 2 days ago

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