Why I'm not able to achieve Synchronization on this below piece of program:

class P
{

synchronized void pp(String s)
    {
        System.out.println (s);
    }
}

class threadA extends Thread 
{
    P ob;
    String s;
    threadA (P ob, String s)
    {
        this.ob = ob;
        this.s = s;
    }
    public void run ()
    {
        for (int i=1;i<=5;++i)
        {
        ob.pp (s);
        try
        {
            Thread.sleep (1000);
        }
        catch (Exception e) {}
        }
    }
}


class gain 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        P ob = new P ();
        threadA a = new threadA (ob,"Hello User");
        threadA b = new threadA (ob,"Bye User");
        a.start();
        b.start();
    }
}

OP:

Hello User

Bye User

Hello User

Bye User

Bye User

...

I want OP in the form of:

Hello User

Hello User

Hello User..

Bye User

Bye User

Bye User..

or my concept of synchronization is wrong?

  • Only the code in pp method is synchronized so when you are waiting (in the sleep), nothing is synchronized. Seems you want to synchronized the "run" method so you could use synchronized(ThreadA.class){ try{ ... }. But even this would not assure you that a start before b – AxelH Dec 7 at 7:45
  • 1
    You need something like CountdownLatch : docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/… – David Soroko Dec 7 at 7:52
  • The flow of control which I've in my mind is this : Please correct me where ever I'm wrong: Thread a gets the chance to run it calls pp() with string s ="Hello User" then this thread a goes to blocking pool the execution control goes to thread b with same object of class P after reaching there thread b finds that method pp() is synchronized and that thread b doesn't have the lock to enter into pp() because it is with thread a which is in blocked pool Therefore no OP is printed Now control goes back to thread a and the loop continues till i != 5 – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 8:05

You cannot do such synchronization from P class. What happens now is that any calls to pp() is blocked if another thread is currently executing the method. As long as the method ends (which is quick if you are just going to print things to the console), the next thread would be allowed to enter the method.

What you are trying to achieve is not possible, unless both the threads are aware of each other and communicate with each other. In other words, when the first thread finishes what it needs to do, it should explicitly inform the second thread to start. This is effectively executing sequentially, instead of parallelly.

Update

You wanted to visualize what is happening so I'll do it here.

  1. You created 2 threads.
  2. You start the first thread.
  3. The first thread starts to run, while some time later the second starts to run as well.
  4. When your first thread runs, it goes to the for loop. Then it calls P.pp().
  5. When P.pp() is called from first thread, it locks the P object.
  6. Since the method is so short, it is going to exit very quickly.
  7. When the method exits, it releases the lock on P.
  8. If your second thread reaches the synchronize block before the first thread exits, it will wait (blocked).
  9. When the first thread exits, the second thread enters as the first thread releases the lock.
  10. The first thread returns to the loop and try to call P.pp() again.
  11. This will continue, depending on which thread is faster, the order of execution would be different.
  • what I've in my mind is this: please correct where I'm wrong :- – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 7:58
  • Thread a gets the chance to run it calls pp() with string s ="Hello User" then this thread a goes to blocking pool the execution control goes to thread b with same object of class P after reaching there thread b finds that method pp() is synchronized and that thread b doesn't have the lock to enter into pp() because it is with thread a which is in blocked pool Therefore no OP is printed Now control goes back to thread a and the loop continues till i != 5 please correct me where ever I'm wrong in this flow of control – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 8:03
  • @vrnvav97 when the first thread exits the synchronized method, it releases the lock allowing another thread to acquire the lock. Note: System.out.println also uses a lock the same way you have done and if locking worked the way you expect only one thread could ever print to the screen which is clearly undesirable. – Peter Lawrey Dec 7 at 8:10
  • @PeterLawrey can u explain me the flow of control of my program? – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 8:21
  • @Jai what can I do so that when first thread exits the pp() after executing it the thread doesn't leaves the lock for second thread to acquire it. – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 8:55

Synchronized keyword means that two threads on that code block have to respect the order they tried to access that block code. It doesn't mean that the execution flow is serialized.

To have what you want try to put the for inside the synchronized block...

You should try something like this

class P
{

void pp(String s)
    {
        System.out.println (s);
    }
}

class threadA extends Thread 
{
    P ob;
    String s;
    threadA (P ob, String s)
    {
        this.ob = ob;
        this.s = s;
    }
    public void run ()
    {
        for (int i=1;i<=5;++i)
        {
            synchronized(ob)
            {
               ob.pp (s);
                try
                {
                    Thread.sleep (10);
                }
                catch (Exception e) {}
            }


        }
    }
}


public class gain 
{
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        P ob = new P ();
        threadA a = new threadA (ob,"Hello User");
        threadA b = new threadA (ob,"Bye User");
        a.start();
        b.start();
    }
}

i.e while sleeping keep thread synchronized so that you get required output or else you are not sure which thread might come up first after sleep. See this

  • 2
    It would work if the synchronized block is outside the loop. – Jai Dec 7 at 8:03
  • 1
    This still releases the lock and allows another thread to acquire it. – Peter Lawrey Dec 7 at 8:08
  • But what I had in my mind the flow of control of my program was Suppose Thread a gets the chance to run it calls pp() with string s ="Hello User" then this thread a goes to blocking pool the execution control goes to thread b with same object of class P after reaching there thread b finds that method pp() is synchronized and that thread b doesn't have the lock to enter into pp() because it is with thread a which is in blocked pool Therefore no OP is printed Now control goes back to thread a and the loop continues till i != 5 please correct me where ever I'm wrong in this flow of control – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 8:14
  • Consider a case in which threadA has already executed pp() & is in sleep state so threadA has completed its synchronized state & there is no lock on pp() so any other thread can acquire lock & you can't predict order of execution in this case. – shanbhagsv Dec 7 at 8:30

can u explain me the flow of control of my program?

"Hello" starts and run through the loop until it reaches the synchronized method

"Bye" does the same.

"Hello" is the first to acquire the lock.

"Bye" blocks waiting for the lock.

"Hello" executes the method and releases the lock.

"Bye" can now acquire the lock and "Hello" has released it

"Bye" can now execute the method, and releases the lock as "Hello" did.

what can I do so that hello after executing the method goes to blocked pool and also doesn't leaves the lock for bye to acquire it

Hold the lock, and don't release it if you want to retain it.

public void run() {
    synchronized(ob); { // hold the lock the whole time
        for (int i = 1; i <= 5; ++i) {
            ob.pp (s);
            try { Thread.sleep(1000); } catch (Exception e) {}
        }
    } // releases the lock here.
}
  • what can I do so that hello after executing the method goes to blocked pool and also doesn't leaves the lock for bye to acquire it – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 8:56
  • @vrnvav97 I have updated my answer. – Peter Lawrey Dec 7 at 9:05
  • But what if I want to use synchronized keyword with the whole method and not just block. and that also my method should be in P class. – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 9:19
  • can u explain me the flow of this program :- class shared { int x; synchronized void show (String s, int a) { x =a; SOPln (s + " " + x); try { Thread.sleep(2000); } catch () } //Thread program run () s.show ("HELLO",10); // where s is shared class object – vrnvav97 Dec 7 at 9:24
  • @vrnvav97 Can you provide more details?. Do you have more than one thread? What is your doubt? – Peter Lawrey Dec 7 at 18:07

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