I have a case class in scala

case class Employee(designation: Int, name: String)

Now I want to define a JSON format for it in Spray.

As I know there are two ways of it.

implicit lazy val employeeProtocol: RootJsonFormat[Employee] = jsonFormat2(Employee.apply)

or

implicit lazy val employeeProtocol: RootJsonFormat[Employee] = jsonFormat(Employee, "designation", "name")

which of the above is a better approach ?? Is there a difference between in them in terms of performance ?

  • for the performance part, you can try yourself very quickly. Even if not using a fully accurate benchmark method (jmh for instance), you can probably have a comparison that works for you – pedrorijo91 Dec 8 at 13:08

There are trade-offs here, of course.

Do you have a schema (either explicit or implied) for your JSON values? If so, are the object keys different from your case class member names? If your answer to both of these questions is "yes", then you're stuck using the more explicit jsonFormat version. If your answer to the first question is "yes" but the second is "no", you might still want to use the more explicit version, just because it's a little less magical.

There are good reasons to prefer the jsonFormat2(Employee.apply) version, though. Suppose you've got the other version:

import spray.json._, DefaultJsonProtocol._

case class Employee(designation: Int, name: String)

implicit lazy val employeeProtocol: RootJsonFormat[Employee] =
  jsonFormat(Employee, "designation", "name")

…and then someone comes along next month and refactors the case class but doesn't notice the instance:

case class Employee(name: String, designation: Int)

implicit lazy val employeeProtocol: RootJsonFormat[Employee] =
  jsonFormat(Employee, "designation", "name")

Congratulations: you have a program that compiles just fine but fails in potentially very confusing ways.

Alternatively, you might just not care what your JSON looks like and don't want to have to maintain member names in two places. In either of these cases, the more concise jsonFormat version is more robust in the face of refactoring.

In terms of performance, the two versions are effectively identical, and in fact jsonFormat2 just calls jsonFormat after using runtime reflection to extract member names from the target type. While this runtime reflection does have a (tiny) cost, this extraction will only happen a single time in the execution of your program (assuming you're using a val or a lazy val to define the instance), and the two will perform exactly the same when it comes to actually decoding JSON.

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