Consider a case like this:

xml_list <- list(
  a = "7",
  b = list("8"),
  c = list(
    c.a = "7",
    c.b = list("8"), 
    c.c = list("9", "10"),
    c.d = c("11", "12", "13")),
  d = c("a", "b", "c"))

what I'm looking for is a way of how to simplify this construct recursively such that unlist is called on any list of length 1. The expected result for above example would look like:

list(
  a = "7",
  b = "8",
  c = list(
    c.a = "7",
    c.b = "8", 
    c.c = list("9", "10"),
    c.d = c("11", "12", "13")),
 d = c("a", "b", "c"))

I have dabbled with rapply, but that explicitly operates on list-members that are NOT lists themselves, so wrote the following:

library(magrittr)
clean_up_list <- function(xml_list){
  xml_list %>%
    lapply(
      function(x){
        if(is.list(x)){
          if(length(x) == 1){
            x %<>%
              unlist()
          } else {
            x %<>%
              clean_up_list()
          }
        }
        return(x)
      })
}

This, however, I can't even test, as Error: C stack usage 7969588 is too close to the limit (at least on lists that I terminally want to process).

Digging deeper (and after mulling over @Roland's response), I came up with a solution that utilizes purrr-goodness, reversely iterates over list depth and NEARLY does what I want:

clean_up_list <- function(xml_list)
{
  list_depth <- xml_list %>%
    purrr::vec_depth()
  for(dl in rev(sequence(list_depth)))
  {
    xml_list %<>%
      purrr::modify_depth(
        .depth = dl,
        .ragged = TRUE,
        .f = function(x)
        {
          if(is.list(x) && length(x) == 1 && length(x[[1]]) == 1)
          {
            unlist(x, use.names = FALSE)
          } else {
            x
          }
        })
  }
  return(xml_list)
}

This appears to work as intended even for lists of the depth I'm dealing with BUT elements that used to be vectors (like c.d and d in the example) now are converted to lists, which defeats the purpose ... any further insight?

I don't understand this magrittr stuff, but it's easy to create a recursive function:

foo <- function(L) lapply(L, function(x) {
  if (is.list(x) && length(x) > 1) return(foo(x))
  if (is.list(x) && length(x) == 1) x[[1]] else x
  })
foo(test_list)

#$`a`
# [1] "A" "B" "C" "D" "E" "F" "G" "H" "I" "J" "K" "L" "M" "N" "O" "P" "Q" "R" "S" "T" "U" "V" "W" "X" "Y" "Z"
#
#$b
#[1] "a"
#
#$c
#$c$`c.1`
#[1] "b"
#
#$c$c.2
# [1] "a" "b" "c" "d" "e" "f" "g" "h" "i" "j" "k" "l" "m" "n" "o" "p" "q" "r" "s" "t" "u" "v" "w" "x" "y" "z"
#
#$c$c.3
#$c$c.3[[1]]
#[1] "c"
#
#$c$c.3[[2]]
#[1] "d"

If this throws an error regarding C stack usuage then you have lists that are deeply nested. You couldn't use recursion then, which would make this a challenging problem. I would then modify the creation of this list if possible. Or you could then try to increase the C stack size.

  • Thanks. This does in essence what my own function attempts and fails with the same C stack problem in a real (deeper) list. – balin Dec 7 at 10:17
  • See the last part of my answer. I think you might have an xy problem. – Roland Dec 7 at 11:44

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