I need to check for a certain condition before a timeout. If the condition is met before the limit then I return True otherwise I return False.

I'm doing this in the following way

counter = 1
condition_met = False
while counter < max_limit:
    if <conditions are met>:
        condition_met = True
        break
    time.sleep(10)
    counter += 1
return condition_met

I'm wondering if there's a more pythonic way to do the same thing.

Thanks in advance for your feedbacks

I am assuming you have a code in a function. The below code get rid of a variable condition_met and break statement.

counter = 1
# condition_met = False
while counter < max_limit:
    if <conditions are met>:
        # condition_met = True
        return True   # get rid of break statement
    time.sleep(10)
    counter += 1
return False
  • 1
    You could save two more lines and a variable by just looping for _ in range(max_limix): (assuming counter is not used in the condition) – tobias_k Dec 7 at 9:39
  • Thanks, indeed you're right but my bad i forgot to add that after the while I print a message whether conditions are met or we reach a timeout but checking condition_met value. Using your solution I'd need to do the check outside my function and at the end it'd almost be the same thing but I prefer yours because it removes a variable – Simon Dec 7 at 9:42
  • 1
    @Simon Instead of True and False you can return the message that you want to print. – Sociopath Dec 7 at 9:45
  • True again but in my case I need to quit my program and print a Warning if False. So I still need to check the value returned. – Simon Dec 7 at 9:58
  • Incrementing a counter isn't a very accurate way of timing something, it's just a count. In this case there is a relationship between elapsed time and loop iterations because of the time.sleep() call in the loop, but in general it will depend on how fast the computer can execute the other statements within the loop. To actually time how long something is or has taken requires determining the amount of time that has elapsed since some starting point. – martineau Dec 12 at 9:02

If it were not for the time.sleep, your loop would be equivalent to

for _ in range(max_limit):
    if <condition>:
        return True
    # time.sleep(10)
return False

Which is equivalent to return any(<condition> for _ in range(max_limit).

Thus, you could (ab)use any and or to check whether the condition is met up to a certai number of times while waiting a bit before each check:

any(time.sleep(10) or <condition> for _ in range(max_limit))

This will first evaluate time.sleep, which returns None, and then evaluate the condition, until the condition is met or the range is exhausted.

The only caveat is that this will call time.sleep even before the first check of the condition. To fix this, you can first check the counter variable and only if that is > 0 call time.sleep:

any(i and time.sleep(10) or <condition> for i in range(10))

Whether that's clearer than the long loop is for you to decide.

  • Thanks Tobias, I'm voiceless – Simon Dec 7 at 10:01
  • 1
    @Simon I am very sorry to hear that. Or did you mean speechless? ;-) – tobias_k Dec 7 at 10:09
  • You're right... – Simon Dec 7 at 10:45

A really good way to time things is by using—shock—the time module:

import time

def foo():
    max_limit = 25  # Seconds.

    start = time.time()
    condition_met = False
    while time.time() - start < max_limit:
        if <conditions are met>:
            condition_met = True
            break
        time.sleep(10)

    return condition_met

See? The module is good for more than just sleeping. ;¬)

  • Thank you for this tip, it's better that computing a counter and increment it – Simon Dec 12 at 7:26

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