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I have the following function:

public list[list[loc]] populateBeforeRemoval(){
    list[list[loc]] dupList = [];
    map[int, list[loc]] finalizedDups = ();

    // Here some stuff is added to the finalizedDups map, however, I have omitted it for simplicity.

    for(dup <- finalizedDups){
        dupList+=finalizedDups[dup];
    }
    return dupList;
}

However, when I run this function, I get the following output:

|project://TestProject/src/astCreation.rsc|(4955,3,<142,40>,<142,43>): Expected list[list[loc]], but got list[value]
Advice: |http://tutor.rascal-mpl.org/Errors/Static/UnexpectedType/UnexpectedType.html|

When I click on the message, it points to the return value (dupList) in the code. It seems that the addition of finalizedDups[dup] erases the type (list[loc]) of the list. This should not be possible right?

Just for the sake of completeness, here is the entire (actual) function:

public list[list[loc]] populateBeforeRemoval(list[list[loc]] dupList, list[loc] potentialDuplicates, list[loc] newPotentialDuplicates, loc location, int lineNumber){
    map[int, list[loc]] finalizedDups = ();
    for(dup <- potentialDuplicates, getSourceLength(dup)>=6){
        bool sameIn = false;
        for(pot <- newPotentialDuplicates){
            if(pot.uri == dup.uri && pot.begin.line == dup.begin.line){
                sameIn = true;
            }
        }
        if(!sameIn){
            int srcLength = getSourceLength(dup);
            if(srcLength in finalizedDups){
                finalizedDups[srcLength]+=dup;
            } else {
                location.end.line = lineNumber-1;
                location.begin.line = lineNumber-srcLength-1;
                finalizedDups[srcLength]=[location, dup];
            }
        }
    }
    for(dup <- finalizedDups){
        dupList+=finalizedDups[dup];
    }
    return dupList;
}

Update:

In the beginning this code showed a lot of errors in the eclipse IDE. After renaming dup to something else most of these errors disappeared. It's probably because dup is a function in the List.rsc (http://tutor.rascal-mpl.org/Rascal/Libraries/Prelude/List/dup/dup.html) which I imported. Seems to be an issue with the Eclipse plugin, the lines that were shown as error are do not create an error in runtime.

The main issue is however not solved. I think this issue is due to appending a list to a list of lists.

1

Nice code. Let's see. Just from reading not running I suspect the += operator of widening the element type to 'value'.

Things to know:

  • "+=" is (still) overloaded for both concatenation and element addition on lists
  • If the two semantics are mixed up the new element type for the assignment is the least upper bound between the entire list's type and its element type which is usually 'value'
  • It helps to wrap the right hand side of the problematic assignment with list brackets to force the concatenation semantics of '+='

Unsolicited Side note: comprehensions and relational operators are usually faster:

for(dup <- finalizedDups){
    dupList+=finalizedDups[dup];
}

Could be: dupList += [*finalizedDups[dup] | dup <- finalizedDups)];

The += is then a single concatenation, the generator loops over the keys like before and the * splices each list value from the map into the resulting list. I didn't test this just thinking out loud. It's faster because under the hood Rascal can use transient mutable state until the list comprehension is finished, while the for loop alternative assumes nothing and uses only immutable internal API.

  • If you would refactor until only using comprehensions, relation inversion, set intersection and projection on relations or maps, and operators like that this code might reduce to about three lines and be pretty fast 👍 I often start with the operational algorithm too (often from a book) and then massage it to functional style step by step. – Jurgen Vinju Dec 7 '18 at 11:25
  • Thanks for these comments. Using dup as a name for a variable results in a error in the eclipse IDE plugin. Your proposal dupList += [*finalizedDups[finDup] | finDup <- finalizedDups] did yield the same issue, but changing it to dupList += [[*finalizedDups[finDup]] | finDup <- finalizedDups] does solve the problem (as you said it helps to wrap the right hand side of the problematic assignment with list brackets to force the concatenation semantics). – Simon Baars Dec 7 '18 at 11:27
  • I indeed need to upgrade my usage of comprehensions, relation inversion, set intersection and projection on relations or maps. It seems to take some time to teach an imperative dog functional tricks ;-). – Simon Baars Dec 7 '18 at 11:29
  • Well you could always do that later. I suspect you have more than this on your schedule. We designed Rascal such that imperative thinkers can express themselves elegantly and creatively and functional thinkers can as well. It's just that we accidentally ended up with a current implementation that is faster for functional code. Go figure 🤪 – Jurgen Vinju Dec 7 '18 at 12:12

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