3

I have a variable with various sentences:

Cats are good pets, for they are clean and are not noisy.
Abstraction is often one floor above you.
She wrote a long letter to Charlie, but he didn't read it.
Where do random thoughts come from?
Mary plays the piano.
I want more detailed information.
I'd rather be a bird than a fish.
When I was little I had a car door slammed shut on my hand. I still remember it quite vividly.
Malls are great places to shop; John can find everything he needs under one roof.
My Mum tries to be cool by saying that she likes all the same things that I do.

How can I create a variable name == 1 if a name is found?

I would also like to have variable name == 2 if any word in the sentence matches a word of my choice (for example letter).

I tried the following:

gen name = regexm(sentence, "letter* & (Charlie | Mary | John)*")` 

However, this does not work. I only get name == 0 in all observations.

  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. Please read How to create high quality reproducible examples in Stata for tips on how you can improve your questions in the future. – Pearly Spencer Dec 7 '18 at 11:42
  • FWIW, stata's regex is pretty primitive compared to what you could do in python/perl/etc. but also a bit simpler to use. As Nick notes, getting decent with regexes is non-trivial but also pretty powerful if you invest the time (caveat, it's a couple of releases ago that I used stata's regex functions, so perhaps they are more advanced now, I haven't kept up) – JohnE Dec 7 '18 at 16:07
  • Stata's regex capabilities are indeed more limited compared to Python. However, Stata has two regex engines - regex() and its unicode equivalent ustrregexm(). The latter is much more developed and far from primitive. It does suffer from poor documentation though. – Pearly Spencer Dec 7 '18 at 16:54
  • Huh, looks like stata will now take \w, \s, \b which I don't think it did a couple of releases ago (although I could be wrong about that) which makes this a lot less primitive than I remember. They really ought to improve the documentation as you note. Stata sort of "brags" about doing a simpler subset of POSIX or perl regex, but if stata would simply follow one of those, they wouldn't have to do much documentation of it! – JohnE Dec 7 '18 at 18:37
1

Consider the sentences in your example:

clear

input strL sentence
"Cats are good pets, for they are clean and are not noisy."
"Abstraction is often one floor above you."
"She wrote a long letter to Charlie, but he didn't read it."
"Where do random thoughts come from?"
"Mary plays the piano."
"I want more detailed information."
"I'd rather be a bird than a fish."
"When I was little I had a car door slammed shut on my hand. I still remember it quite vividly."
"Malls are great places to shop; John can find everything he needs under one roof."
"My Mum tries to be cool by saying that she likes all the same things that I do."           
end

By combining the strmatch() and ustrregexm() functions:

generate name = strmatch(sentence, "*letter*") + ustrregexm(sentence, "(Charlie|Mary|John)")

You can get the desired output:

list name, separator(0)

     +------+
     | name |
     |------|
  1. |    0 |
  2. |    0 |
  3. |    2 |
  4. |    0 |
  5. |    1 |
  6. |    0 |
  7. |    0 |
  8. |    0 |
  9. |    1 |
 10. |    0 |
     +------+
  • Thank you Pearly Spencer! – Pipa Stevens Dec 10 '18 at 11:35
  • @PipaStevens you can also up-vote helpful answers using the upper arrow above the check-mark. – Pearly Spencer Dec 10 '18 at 12:29
1

Regular expressions are great, but the Catch-22 is that you have to work quite hard at learning the language; if and when you get proficient, then you see the benefits.

I'll leave it to other answers to give smart regex solutions. The purpose here is to emphasise that other string functions can be serviceable. Here I exploit the fact that strpos() returns a positive result, equivalent to true, if it finds a string within another string. Also, that Stata will parse into words, so that even (e.g.) finding a string if and only if it is a word is not too difficult from first principles.

clear 
input strL whatever 
"Cats are good pets, for they are clean and are not noisy."
"Abstraction is often one floor above you."
"She wrote a long letter to Charlie, but he didn't read it."
"Where do random thoughts come from?"
"Mary plays the piano."
"I want more detailed information."
"I'd rather be a bird than a fish."
"When I was little I had a car door slammed shut on my hand. I still remember it quite vividly."
"Malls are great places to shop; John can find everything he needs under one roof."
"My Mum tries to be cool by saying that she likes all the same things that I do."
end 

gen wanted1 = strpos(whatever, "Charlie") | strpos(whatever, "Mary") | strpos(whatever, "John") 

* cat or cats as a word 
gen wanted2 = 0 
gen wordcount = wordcount(whatever) 
su wordcount, meanonly 
local J = r(max) 
quietly foreach w in cat cats { 
    forval j = 1/`J' { 
        replace wanted2 = 1 if word(lower(whatever), `j') == "`w'" 
    }
} 

gen what = substr(whatever, 1, 40) 
list wanted? what, sep(0) 

     +--------------------------------------------------------------+
     | wanted1   wanted2                                       what |
     |--------------------------------------------------------------|
  1. |       0         1   Cats are good pets, for they are clean a |
  2. |       0         0   Abstraction is often one floor above you |
  3. |       1         0   She wrote a long letter to Charlie, but  |
  4. |       0         0        Where do random thoughts come from? |
  5. |       1         0                      Mary plays the piano. |
  6. |       0         0          I want more detailed information. |
  7. |       0         0          I'd rather be a bird than a fish. |
  8. |       0         0   When I was little I had a car door slamm |
  9. |       1         0   Malls are great places to shop; John can |
 10. |       0         0   My Mum tries to be cool by saying that s |
     +--------------------------------------------------------------+
  • Naturally, typing help strpos() or the name of any other function gives more details regarding its syntax and use. – Pearly Spencer Dec 7 '18 at 11:53
  • Note that the OP wants 1 if a name is matched and 2 if both a name and a word are a match. – Pearly Spencer Dec 7 '18 at 11:55
  • You provided a fine direct solution; I am just expanding on the matter. – Nick Cox Dec 7 '18 at 11:58

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