I have developed a Windows Service capable of running a few plugins. Due to its nature, when developing Windows Services, the Start and Stop methods should run and return as fast as possible. The Start method runs Start methods from all plugins, which also should not block the execution. In this example, both plugins instantiate a Threading.Timer, which run in background.

The execution order happens as follows. The arrows indicate what runs in a different thread:

-> MyService.Start -> pA.Start -> pb.Start -> return
                          \_> DoWork()  \
                                         \_> DoWork()

Since both DoWork() are running inside a Timer, if an Exception happens, I am unable to catch it. This could easily be avoided if I could modify PluginA and PluginB, but I can't.

Any suggestion on what I could do to avoid this issue? Thanks in advance.

The following code is an oversimplification of the real code:

public class MyService
{
    private PluginA pA = new PluginA();
    private PluginB pB = new PluginB();

    // Windows Service runs Start when the service starts. It must return ASAP
    public void Start()
    {
        // try..catch doesn't capture PluginB's exception
        pA.Start();
        pB.Start();
    }

    // Windows Service runs Stop when the service Stops. It must return ASAP
    public void Stop()
    {
        pA.Stop();
        pB.Stop();
    }
}

// I have no control over how this is developed
public class PluginA
{
    private Timer _timer;

    public void Start()
    {
        _timer = new Timer(
            (e) => DoWork(),
            null,
            TimeSpan.Zero,
            TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
    }

    private void DoWork()
    {
        File.AppendAllText(
            "C:/log.txt",
            "hello" + Environment.NewLine);
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, 0);
    }
}

// I have no control over how this is developed
public class PluginB
{
    private Timer _timer;

    public void Start()
    {
        _timer = new Timer(
            (e) => DoWork(),
            null,
            TimeSpan.Zero,
            TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10));
    }

    private void DoWork()
    {
        File.AppendAllText(
            "C:/log.txt",
            "Goodbye" + Environment.NewLine);

        throw  new Exception("Goodbye");
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        _timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, 0);
    }
}
  • Are the exceptions handled by those plugins? – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Dec 7 at 14:57
  • @LasseVågsætherKarlsen they could be, if I enforced the developers to do so. But, since I am developing the Windows Service, I am attempting to ensure that even if a developer makes a mistake, I am able to recover from this mistake, instead of crashing the whole application. – Vitor Subs Dec 7 at 15:03
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can also use the AppDomain.UnhandledException Event.

Please note that you can't recover from such an exception.

  • Thanks for the input. Indeed, I was able to capture the Exception, but I wasn't able to keep the application running. If there isn't a way of recovering from such an exception, how do applications like Visual Studio prevent a plugin from crashing the whole application? – Vitor Subs Dec 7 at 15:06
  • 1
    Run it in a separate process. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Dec 7 at 15:10
  • 1
    Indeed, you can run the plugins in a separate process, then monitor it via a wait handle. You can also make the process return an error code on error which you can examine and see if the process terminated properly, or faulted with an exception. – Nick Dec 7 at 16:14
  • @Nick thank you. I have re-implemented the application using processes. – Vitor Subs Dec 7 at 20:35

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