I have a rule that runs against an object before an actual evaluation takes place. The rule checks that the collection is not null and that the elements have a valid id (greater than zero). When testing with a null collection this behaves as expected. However when testing with a non null collection with invalid arguments the evaluation does not behave as I expect. Without parenthesis the expression containing the null coalescing operator returns true but with parenthesis it returns the correct value. Trying to understand how this changes the evaluation of operations as I would imagine them to evaluate to the same result in both cases.

var testRule = new CollectionRule(null);
testRule.Verify();
//Verify => False
testRule.Verify2();
//Verify2 => False
testRule = new CollectionRule(new int[] { -1 });
testRule.Verify();
//Verify => True
testRule.Verify2();
//Verify2 => False


public class CollectionRule
{
    private IEnumerable<int> _elements;
    public CollectionRule(IEnumerable<int> elements) => _elements = elements;
    public bool Verify()
    {
      bool result = _elements?.GetEnumerator().MoveNext() ?? false && _elements.All(i => i > 0);
      System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine($"Verify => {result}");
      return result;
    }
    public bool Verify2()
    {
      bool result = (_elements?.GetEnumerator().MoveNext() ?? false) && _elements.All(i => i > 0);
      System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine($"Verify2 => {result}");
      return result;
    }
}
up vote 0 down vote accepted

&& has a higher precedence than ??, so this:

a ?? b && c

will be evaluated like:

a ?? (b && c)

In your case b is false, and false && c is just false, so the whole thing simplifies down to a ?? false.

  • And is it not the expression operator of () which delineates the expressions and provides the intended result? Obviously operator precedence is important PEMDOS, MDAS, ETC but it's the separation of those expressions which provides the difference in this example also.... – Jay Dec 7 at 18:15
  • 1
    false && c is just false; false || c is just c. The "issue" is more that a!=null so the result in the non-parenthesized case is a or true due to precedence – pinkfloydx33 Dec 7 at 18:37
  • @pinkfloydx33 Right, I didn't pay close enough attention since, as you noted, it's irrelevant anyway in the non-null case, which is what was asked about. But fixed. – Servy Dec 7 at 18:39

It's because your parenthesis aren't in the correct place and little to do with the null coalescing operator and more to do with the expression operator.

bool result = (_elements?.GetEnumerator().MoveNext() ?? false) && _elements.All(i => i > 0);

Should be

bool result = (_elements?.GetEnumerator().MoveNext() ?? false && _elements.All(i => i > 0));

To make them equivalent.

  • 1
    There are no parenthesis in the first evaluation of verify, nor does there need to be. Also after changing the parenthesis to your suggestion it still evaluates to true. – fanuc_bob Dec 7 at 17:47
  • If you remove the parenthesis the results are obviously the same so I am not sure what you mean... hence my unchanged answer – Jay Dec 7 at 18:02

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