4

Brand new to ASP.Net Core. Having to create an asp.net core 2.2 project with Identity (and have users seeded).

I can't find any documentation on how to do this exactly.

I was able to find the code to create Identity Roles (compiles anyway, haven't gotten to where I can run it yet:

  private static async Task CreateUserTypes(ApplicationDbContext authContext, IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
  {
     var RoleManager = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<RoleManager<IdentityRole>>();
     string[] roleNames = { "Administrator", "Data Manager", "Interviewer", "Respondent" };
     IdentityResult roleResult;
     foreach (var roleName in roleNames)
     {
        var roleExist = await RoleManager.RoleExistsAsync(roleName);
        if (!roleExist)
        {
           roleResult = await RoleManager.CreateAsync(new IdentityRole(roleName));
        }
     }
  }

Now, I need to create some users. But the with the weird microsoft syntax to do that I can't find (been googling for 2 days).

Here's what does not work:

   private static async Task CreateRootUser(Models.CensORContext context, ApplicationDbContext authContext, IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
  {
     //Create the root ADMIN user for all things admin.
     UserManager<ApplicationDbContext> userManager = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<UserManager<ApplicationDbContext>>();

     IdentityUser user = new IdentityUser()
     {
        UserName = "admin@admin.admin",
        Email = "admin@admin.admin"
     };

     var NewAdmin = await userManager.CreateAsync(user, "password");
  }

The error I see is:

Argument1: cannot convert from 'Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity.IdentityUser' to 'ApplicationDbContext'

Does that mean? Obviously, I don't have the right userManager. But, how do I get the right one that takes a user as the 1st parameter and a string (password) for the 2nd?

In addition, the examples that come up in Google searches have an ApplicationUser object that I do not have (and don't need?). Not defined in the examples as to how I get it.

Owen

OK. Got past syntax error, but now I'm getting a runtime error:

NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to an instance of an object. on the call to CreateAsync. Here's the new code:

private static async Task CreateRootUser(Models.CensORContext context, ApplicationDbContext authContext, IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
{
     //Create the root ADMIN user for all things admin.         
     var userStore = new UserStore<IdentityUser>(authContext);
     UserManager<IdentityUser> userManager = new UserManager<IdentityUser>(userStore, null, null, null, null, null, null, serviceProvider, null);
     // = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<UserManager<ApplicationDbContext>>();

     IdentityUser user = new IdentityUser()
     {
        UserName = "admin@admin.admin",
        Email = "admin@admin.admin"
     };

     var result = await userManager.CreateAsync(user, "password");
}

Going to be looking into what the other parameters are to the create userManager and how to get them from the serviceProvider?

--Owen

Figured out how to do it. The key was finding the correct serviceprovider to pass in and the right syntax for creating the userManager. The other answers I've found through google all replace the IdentityUser with their own ApplicationUser that was muddying the water. Here's the working function (hope this helps someone):

  private static async Task CreateRootUser(Models.CensORContext context, ApplicationDbContext authContext, IServiceProvider serviceProvider)
  {
     //Create the root ADMIN user for all things admin.         
     var userStore = new UserStore<IdentityUser>(authContext);
     UserManager<IdentityUser> userManager = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<UserManager<IdentityUser>>();
     //new UserManager<IdentityUser>(userStore, null, null, null, null, null, null, serviceProvider, null);
     // = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<UserManager<ApplicationDbContext>>();

     IdentityUser user = new IdentityUser()
     {
        UserName = "admin@admin.admin",
        Email = "admin@admin.admin"
     };

     var result = await userManager.CreateAsync(user, "password");
     result = await userManager.AddToRoleAsync(user, "Administrator");
  }
5
  • 1
    I understand the frustration when trying to get a code working, especially with a tight deadline. I also understand the temptation to scream it out SO or something. We have all been there at some point(s). While your question does convey what your coding issue is, do try to stay calm while posting questions. This way all are more focused on your programming concern. Dec 9, 2018 at 1:25
  • did you create your new project with the default template with individual user? Dec 9, 2018 at 1:25
  • I suggest you add the last paragraph, which seems to be the working code as your answer and remove it from the question Dec 9, 2018 at 1:54
  • have a look at this docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/…. This seems to be where your real issue lies, not identity. It would help to have a better understanding of this concept. Dec 9, 2018 at 1:58
  • stackOverflow will not let me post answers yet (not enough reputation points) - so I put my working code in the answer. I'm sure there's a better way to do it as well... Thank you all for your comments and helpfulness. I'll work on keeping my frustrations toned down - so easy to shout when no one is around... Thanks.
    – Owen
    Dec 10, 2018 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

4

Your main issue seems to be dependency injection. Have a look at this link for more information. As long as you inject your DbContext and UserManager in the right way and the rest of the code should be fine.

Here is an example. You can set up a separate service for seeding to ensure you decouple your code from the rest.

public class UserSeeder
{
    private readonly UserManager<IdentityUser> userManager;
    private readonly ApplicationDbContext context;

    public UserSeeder(UserManager<IdentityUser> userManager, ApplicationDbContext context)
    {
        this.userManager = userManager;
        this.context = context;
    }

    public async Task `()
    {
        string username = "admin@admin.admin";
        var users = context.Users;
        if (!context.Users.Any(u => u.UserName == username))
        {
            var done = await userManager.CreateAsync(new IdentityUser
            {
                UserName = username,
                Email = username
            }, username);
        }
    }

}

You then have to add this class as a scoped (since your DbContext is scoped) by using services.AddScoped<UserSeeder>() in your startup. You can now simply inject your UserSeeder in any service (except singletons) and call your UserSeeder function. For instance, You can inject UserSeeder in the home controller and call it index action. This way the seeding is checked and added initially. However, this will only work IF you go to the home page first. Alternatively, you can set up a middleware like this in your startup class:

app.Use(async (context, next) => {
    await context.RequestServices.GetService<UserSeeder>().SeedAsync();
    await next();
});

Note that both of these ways, you are calling the database every time. You can plan on where to place it. You can also make sure this is only called once with the help of a boolean (could be in a singleton). But note that this would only run on application startup.

3
  • How do I "inject UserSeeder in the home controller"? -OR- where do I put the "app.Use(...." so that I have a context, etc...?
    – Owen
    Dec 10, 2018 at 21:36
  • to inject into a controller or any service, you will need to pass it as a constructor parameter public HomeController(UserSeeder userSeeder). Basically, the same way I have injected UserManager<IdentityUser> into the UserSeeder in the controller. app.Use( goes at the start your Confugure function in your Startup class. Dec 10, 2018 at 21:48
  • Ahhh.... This injecting is quite powerful with different syntax that I'm used to. Do you have a recommendation for a blog/blog/course/etc to understand how to use it (and not necessarily how it works or how to build one)?
    – Owen
    Dec 12, 2018 at 0:40
2

Here's how I seed my Admin user (learned from EF Core in Action book):

This is the User class:

public class User : IdentityUser<long>
{
    //add your extra properties and relations
}

The long type specifies the primary key type. If you use the default IdentityUser class it's going to be string (uniqueidentifier in SQL).

This is the Role class:

public class Role : IdentityRole<long>
{
    public static string Admin = "Admin";
}

It can be empty, I use static strings to avoid magic strings in my code.

This is the DbContext:

public class ApplicationDbContext : IdentityDbContext<User, Role, long>
{
    public ApplicationDbContext(DbContextOptions<ApplicationDbContext> options)
        : base(options)
    { }

    //your DbSets and configurations
    //...
}

If you're going to use Identity, you need to use IdentityDbContext and specify your custom User and Role class and the type of primary key you're using.

This code adds Identity to the program:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    //...

    services.AddIdentity<User, Role>(options =>
        {
            //you can configure your password and user policy here
            //for example:
            options.Password.RequireDigit = false;
        })
        .AddEntityFrameworkStores<ApplicationDbContext>()
        .AddDefaultTokenProviders();

    //...
}

This is an extension method to seed data:

public static class SeedData
{
    public static IWebHost SeedAdminUser(this IWebHost webHost)
    {
        using (var scope = webHost.Services.CreateScope())
        {
            try
            {
                var context = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<ApplicationDbContext>();
                context.Database.EnsureCreated();

                var userManager = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<UserManager<User>>();
                var roleManager = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<RoleManager<Role>>();

                if (!userManager.Users.Any(u => u.Email == "admin@domain.com"))
                {
                    roleManager.CreateAsync(new Role()
                    {
                        Name = Role.Admin
                    })
                    .Wait();

                    userManager.CreateAsync(new User
                    {
                        UserName = "Admin",
                        Email = "admin@domain.com"
                    }, "secret")
                    .Wait();

                    userManager.AddToRoleAsync(userManager.FindByEmailAsync("admin@domain.com").Result, Role.Admin).Wait();
                }                    
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                var logger = scope.ServiceProvider.GetRequiredService<ILogger<Program>>();
                logger.LogError(ex, "An error occurred while seeding user.");
                //throw;
            }
        }

        return webHost;
    }
}

And finally use it in your Program.cs:

CreateWebHostBuilder(args)
    .Build()
    .SeedAdminUser()
    .Run();
3
  • This is a good approach and quite informative, however couple of suggestions. Firstly, instead of using GetRequiredService for each service, it would be cleaner and more flexible if you create a separate class and use it as a service. Secondly, you can run this on the Configure function in startup instead of creating an extension and running on program.cs (code is more the job of startup). I also find the first three sets of code not really relevent to the question Dec 10, 2018 at 21:12
  • Codes in the Configure method will run for every request. Seeding data should occur only once during the application startup.
    – Sasan
    Dec 11, 2018 at 7:15
  • 1
    Not exactly. the Configure method is called only once. The middlewares created within the function are called for every request. I was talking about calling the SeedAdminUser inside configure not creating a middleware. Dec 12, 2018 at 1:41

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