553

I have a very simple functional component as follows:

import * as React from 'react';

export interface AuxProps  { 
    children: React.ReactNode
 }


const aux = (props: AuxProps) => props.children;

export default aux;

And another component:

import * as React from "react";

export interface LayoutProps  { 
   children: React.ReactNode
}

const layout = (props: LayoutProps) => (
    <Aux>
        <div>Toolbar, SideDrawer, Backdrop</div>
        <main>
            {props.children}
        </main>
    <Aux/>
);

export default layout;

I keep on getting the following error:

[ts] JSX element type 'ReactNode' is not a constructor function for JSX elements. Type 'undefined' is not assignable to type 'ElementClass'. [2605]

How do I type this correctly?

2
  • 1
    To avoid reinventing wheel, you can alternatively use React.FC to define your Functional Component. i e., const layout React.FC = (props) => {/*component body*/} May 26, 2021 at 22:21
  • you can use const XyzComponent = ({ title, children }: React.PropsWithChildren<XyzComponentPropsType> => {}`
    – STEEL
    Jul 11 at 8:39

22 Answers 22

687

Just children: React.ReactNode.

7
  • 17
    This is the correct answer here ! JSX.Element is not good enough since a valid React children could be a string, a boolean, null... ReactChild is incomplete too for the same reasons Jan 27, 2020 at 15:56
  • 8
    @PierreFerry The issue is, almost anything can be assigned to ReactNode. It doesn't help in terms of type safety, similar to typing children as any - see my answer for an explanation.
    – ford04
    Mar 17, 2020 at 13:29
  • 10
    or PropsWithChildren
    – kimbaudi
    Feb 10, 2021 at 19:19
  • 23
    Confused...isn't that what OP already has? Jun 26, 2021 at 13:33
  • 6
    @JanacMeena it's funny but people were finding this question when didn't know what type they should add to the children's element. It's simply just one of the first topics on Google. So if you don't know what TS type add to the element you probably will google something like "typescript react children", find this topic and the first answer, even if the question is quite about something different :)
    – Ridd
    Apr 22 at 7:41
109

In order to use <Aux> in your JSX, it needs to be a function that returns ReactElement<any> | null. That's the definition of a function component.

However, it's currently defined as a function that returns React.ReactNode, which is a much wider type. As React typings say:

type ReactNode = ReactChild | ReactFragment | ReactPortal | boolean | null | undefined;

Make sure the unwanted types are neutralized by wrapping the returned value into React Fragment (<></>):

const aux: React.FC<AuxProps> = props =>
  <>{props.children}</>;
7
  • 1
    I don't understand why it's needed to wrap children in a React Fragment. Care to explain? In React it's perfectly valid to just return children;. Jul 25, 2019 at 1:48
  • 1
    Not if children are an array. If that's the case you need to either wrap them in a single node or use React Fragments. Jul 25, 2019 at 9:48
  • Yeah, in my code I have: return React.Children.count(children) > 1 ? <>{children}</> : children, but typescript complains about that. I replaced it with just <>{children}</>. Jul 25, 2019 at 14:38
  • 2
    It complains because children is a list of elements that happens to contain only 1 item. I think it would work if you did return React.Children.count(children) > 1 ? <>{children}</> : children[0] @sanfilippopablo
    – tamj0rd2
    Aug 17, 2019 at 19:27
  • 1
    This doesn't appear to be working in newer versions of React. I console logged and can confirm that I have a children prop, but even with <React.Fragment> surrounding {props.children} I am not returning anything.
    – Mark
    Feb 29, 2020 at 0:09
85

You can use ReactChildren and ReactChild:

import React, { ReactChildren, ReactChild } from 'react';
 
interface AuxProps {
  children: ReactChild | ReactChildren;
}

const Aux = ({ children }: AuxProps) => (<div>{children}</div>);

export default Aux;

If you need to pass flat arrays of elements:

interface AuxProps {
  children: ReactChild | ReactChild[] | ReactChildren | ReactChildren[];
}
4
  • 8
    For anyone who ended up here, this is wrong. ReactChildren does not equal to ReactChild[] since it is type for utility function. reactjs.org/docs/react-api.html#reactchildren. if you use ReactChild | ReactChildren , you won't be able to pass children as an array.
    – kay
    Jan 7, 2021 at 7:24
  • @kay Thanks for that. I added the flat arrays definition to the answer. It should cover your case too. Let me know.
    – Wilk
    Jan 7, 2021 at 15:26
  • 2
    thank you! However, I don't think ReactChildren is the right type here. I think children: ReactChild | ReactChild[] is enough or just ReactNode
    – kay
    Jan 8, 2021 at 1:54
  • 3
    I disagree. Its better to create a type/interface as ReactNode compared to ReactChild and ReactChildren since it accepts more than just ReactChild/ReactChildren. Or even better, use PropsWithChildren as others have mentioned.
    – kimbaudi
    Feb 10, 2021 at 19:12
77

This is what worked for me:

interface Props {
  children: JSX.Element[] | JSX.Element
}

Edit I would recommend using children: React.ReactNode instead now.

4
  • 16
    That's not broad enough of a definition. The child could be a string.
    – Mike S
    Apr 25, 2019 at 23:09
  • At least this example worked for me since my component was supposed to expect 1 or more JSX.Elements. Thanks! May 28, 2019 at 15:07
  • 2
    This will not work with JavaScript expressions as the children <MyComponent>{ condition ? <span>test</span> : null}</MyComponent>. Using children: ReactNode will work. Oct 5, 2019 at 17:56
  • 1
    or use PropsWithChildren as others have mentioned. I personally prefer it to children: React.ReactNode
    – kimbaudi
    Feb 10, 2021 at 19:17
69

You can also use React.PropsWithChildren<P>.

type ComponentWithChildProps = React.PropsWithChildren<{example?: string}>;
4
  • 4
    This is exactly what I've been doing and I think it's the cleaner way to use the right typing. Sep 3, 2020 at 15:02
  • 3
    I like this solution because it is extensible. type AuthProviderProps = React.PropsWithChildren<{}> allows me to encapsulate React types, and extend with my own when needed.
    – Dragos
    May 25, 2021 at 17:55
  • 2
    cleanest way, the one i was looking for Feb 14 at 16:06
  • 1
    This feels the cleanest because it's using React's own published types so if the definition of what constitutes a react child changes in future versions of React, it is reasonable to assume that this type will also be updated. Solutions based on ReactChild | ReactChildren, would probably need to be updated in that case.
    – pgraham
    Mar 6 at 17:01
19

A React Node is one of the following types:

  • Boolean (which is ignored)
  • null or undefined (which is ignored)
  • Number
  • String
  • A React element (result of JSX)
  • An array of any of the above, possibly a nested one
15

you can declare your component like this:

const MyComponent: React.FunctionComponent = (props) => {
    return props.children;
}
1
  • 4
    the general consensus today is that React.FunctionComponent (or the shorthand React.FC) is discouraged. In your case, I would remove React.FC usage and just do const MyComponent = ({children}: PropsWithChildren<{}>)
    – kimbaudi
    Feb 10, 2021 at 19:18
15
import { ReactNode, FC } from 'react'

type Props = { children: ReactNode }

const App: FC<Props> = ({children}) => (<div>{children}</div>)
1
  • 1
    FC already has children, so no need to redeclare it
    – Aziz
    Apr 21 at 10:58
13

The function component return type is limited to JSXElement | null in TypeScript. This is a current type limitation, pure React allows more return types.

Minimal demonstration snippet

You can either use a type assertion or Fragments as workaround:

const Aux = (props: AuxProps) => <>props.children</>; 
const Aux2 = (props: AuxProps) => props.children as ReactElement; 

ReactNode

children: React.ReactNode might be suboptimal, if the goal is to have strong types for Aux.

Almost anything can be assigned to current ReactNode type, which is equivalent to {} | undefined | null. A safer type for your case could be:

interface AuxProps {
  children: ReactElement | ReactElement[]
}

Example:

Given Aux needs React elements as children, we accidently added a string to it. Then above solution would error in contrast to ReactNode - take a look at the linked playgrounds.

Typed children are also useful for non-JSX props, like a Render Prop callback.

13

I'm using the following

type Props = { children: React.ReactNode };

const MyComponent: React.FC<Props> = ({children}) => {
  return (
    <div>
      { children }
    </div>
  );

export default MyComponent;
3
  • 7
    the general consensus today is that React.FunctionComponent (or the shorthand React.FC) is discouraged. In your case, I would remove React.FC usage and just do const MyComponent = ({children}: PropsWithChildren<{}>)
    – kimbaudi
    Feb 10, 2021 at 19:14
  • propsWithChildren<{}> however also introduces some codesmells with {} being any Apr 12, 2021 at 11:23
  • 2
    If you are using React.FC, there is no need to include children type, as it is already defined on the base FC typings.
    – wentjun
    Sep 9, 2021 at 5:31
11

The general way to find any type is by example. The beauty of typescript is that you have access to all types, so long as you have the correct @types/ files.

To answer this myself I just thought of a component react uses that has the children prop. The first thing that came to mind? How about a <div />?

All you need to do is open vscode and create a new .tsx file in a react project with @types/react.

import React from 'react';

export default () => (
  <div children={'test'} />
);

Hovering over the children prop shows you the type. And what do you know -- Its type is ReactNode (no need for ReactNode[]).

enter image description here

Then if you click into the type definition it brings you straight to the definition of children coming from DOMAttributes interface.

// node_modules/@types/react/index.d.ts
interface DOMAttributes<T> {
  children?: ReactNode;
  ...
}

Note: This process should be used to find any unknown type! All of them are there just waiting for you to find them :)

1
  • 1
    Control + click (on windows) takes you to said type-definition. May be common knowledge but I had to look up. Thanks for teaching us to fish instead of just giving fish btw.
    – gcr
    Feb 16, 2021 at 2:56
9

From the TypeScript site: https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/6471

The recommended practice is to write the props type as {children?: any}

That worked for me. The child node can be many different things, so explicit typing can miss cases.

There's a longer discussion on the followup issue here: https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/13618, but the any approach still works.

9

You can also use JSX.ElementChildrenAttribute

export default function Layout({children}: JSX.ElementChildrenAttribute) {
    return <div>
        {children}
    </div>
}
7

These answers appear to be outdated - React now has a built in type PropsWithChildren<{}>. It is defined similarly to some of the correct answers on this page:

type PropsWithChildren<P> = P & { children?: ReactNode };

3
  • 1
    What is P in the case of that type?
    – sunpietro
    Jul 8, 2020 at 8:42
  • P is the type of your component's props
    – Tim Iles
    Jul 17, 2020 at 14:16
  • 1
    Yes! this worked nicely. interface LayoutProps {} const Layout = ({children}: PropsWithChildren<LayoutProps>) => {...}
    – cyrf
    Dec 12, 2020 at 18:17
5

This has always worked for me:

type Props = {
  children: JSX.Element;
};
2
  • 1
    I would recommend just using React.PropsWithChildren<{}> or at least React.ReactNode instead of JSX.Element since it accpets more than just Element type
    – kimbaudi
    Feb 10, 2021 at 19:15
  • This work for me too. I think typescript typings is becoming messy now.
    – govo
    Apr 16, 2021 at 6:57
3

As a type that contains children, I'm using:

type ChildrenContainer = Pick<JSX.IntrinsicElements["div"], "children">

This children container type is generic enough to support all the different cases and also aligned with the ReactJS API.

So, for your example it would be something like:

const layout = ({ children }: ChildrenContainer) => (
    <Aux>
        <div>Toolbar, SideDrawer, Backdrop</div>
        <main>
            {children}
        </main>
    <Aux/>
)
2

For me @Sibren's answer was not clear enough but I found this SO anwer and made it all inline (that's maybe not the shortest way but the one I find the easiest to grasp).

function MyComponentWithChildren({
    customProp,
    children, /*notice the children are implicit*/
}: React.PropsWithChildren<{ customProp: any }>) {
    return <div>{children}</div>;
}
1
  1. you should know that any react component should return null or React.Element, but the type of props.children is React.ReactNode, so you need to use the props.children inside an Element to make the babel configure the constructor of the Element.

  2. the second rule of any react component is that the first letter of the naming should be a capital letter to let the react recognize that the component isn't a html tag.

so the code should be like this.

const Aux = (props: AuxProps) => <>props.children</>;

another hint if you still using typescript, the functional component should be type of React.FC like this

type Props = {
   title: string;
}

const Aux:React.FC<Props> = (props) =>
(
    <div>
        <h3>{props.title}</h3>
        { props.children }
        {/* children is exist by default in type React.FC */}
    </div>
)
1

this solution works perfectly fine for me

interface Props {
    children: Array<ReactElement<ChildProps, JSXElementConstructor<ChildType>>>;
}

update: a comprehensive example so that it is easier to understand.

interface ChildProps {}

class ChildComponent extends React.Component<ChildProps> {}

interface ParentProps {
    children: Array<ReactElement<ChildProps, JSXElementConstructor<ChildComponent>>>;
}

class ParentComponent extends React.Component<ParentProps> {}
1
  • If your "children" should be safely typed, within your parent component, this the one and only solution. Thank you very much, Sir!
    – BenjaminR
    Jun 24 at 7:37
0

You can create a simple component that outputs just children prop without type or interface with FC (functional component). You have to wrap with empty jsx tags <>, as children can be undefined or null:

import { FC } from "react";

export const Layout: FC = (props) => {
  return <>{props.children}</>;
};

-- or --

import { FC } from "react";

export const Layout: FC = ({ children }) => <>{children}</>;
0

You can also extends React.PropsWithChildren to your interface which contains children property.

interface Props extends React.PropsWithChildren{
    listItems: Items[],
    clickItem?: () => void,
    
}

Or you can directly define the children

interface Props{
    listItems: Items[],
    clickItem?: () => void,
    children: React.ReactNode  
}

const List:FC<Props> = ({listItems,clickItem,children}) =>  {

  return (
    <>
    {children}
    </>
    
  )
}

Or you can do like this. This is a another way to defining prop type

const List = ({ children }: {children: React.ReactNode}) =>  {
0

For me "JSX.Element" works,

interface childrenProps {
    children: JSX.Element;
}

const index = ({ children }: childrenProps) => {
    return (
        <>
            <NavBar />
            {children}
        </>
    );
};

export default index;

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