3

I have a very simple template function to compare the rank field of two structs:

template<typename T>
bool comp_rank(const T &a, const T &b){
    return a.rank < b.rank;
}

This worked fine, until I compiled with -std=c++11. Now, I get the error

error: parameter "b" is not a type name
      return a.rank < b.rank;
                      ^

./src/util.h(123): error: expected a ">"
      return a.rank < b.rank;
                       ^

What gives? This seems like basic syntax that I would surprised to find had changed after C++11.

2
  • Shot in the dark here.. Because I vaguely remember seeing a question similar to this the other day.. But could you try: b.rank > a.rank ?
    – Chris
    Dec 10, 2018 at 19:52
  • 1
    Can you please also add the struct? A minimal reproducible example will help us
    – AndyG
    Dec 10, 2018 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

7

Edit: I've submitted a bug report to gcc here. It's currently unconfirmed.

Given that you accepted @Klaus' answer, your code looks something like this (thanks @krzaq):

#include <type_traits>

using namespace std;

struct A{ int rank; };

template<typename T>
bool comp_rank(const T &a, const T &b){
    return a.rank < b.rank;
}

int main()
{
    A a{42}, b{0};
    comp_rank(a, b);
}

Both gcc (9.0.0 and earlier were tested), and clang (8.0.0 and earlier were tested) reject this code on the grounds that they are expecting the id-expression a.rank< to be the start of a template. According to the standard, this is the wrong interpretation. See [basic.lookup.classref]

In a class member access expression, if the . or -> token is immediately followed by an identifier followed by a <, the identifier must be looked up to determine whether the < is the beginning of a template argument list or a less-than operator. The identifier is first looked up in the class of the object expression. If the identifier is not found, it is then looked up in the context of the entire postfix-expression and shall name a class template.

The compiler should have looked up a.rank and discovered it to be an integer member of class A. MSVC 19.00.23506 compiles it just fine

2
  • Thanks a lot, this is enlightening. Unfortunately I'm running this as a parallel job on a large machine, which makes playing with different compilers nontrivial -_- Dec 10, 2018 at 20:36
  • Can you please fill the bug report? Thanks for the explanation!
    – Klaus
    Dec 10, 2018 at 20:37
5

Your problem is that you use

using namespace std;

Because c++11 introduces a template rank

See here : https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/types/rank

If you remove the using statement, everything compiles fine again!

Here is the error message given by gcc 8.2.1

main.cpp: In function 'bool comp_rank(const T&, const T&)':
main.cpp:41:23: error: type/value mismatch at argument 1 in template parameter list for 'template<class> struct std::rank'
    return a.rank < b.rank;

It is not a good idea to use using namespace ... anyway. You gave already a good example ;)

18
  • 2
    @Klaus: You may be right, but we cannot really tell until OP posts a minimal reproducible example or chimes in on this comment thread saying that fixed it. For now you're guessing.
    – AndyG
    Dec 10, 2018 at 19:58
  • 1
    I didn't downvote you, sir. That is another assumption on your part.
    – AndyG
    Dec 10, 2018 at 20:02
  • 1
    @krzaq Look at it as a.rank<b .rank. Since std::rank is a template it requires a closing > for rank<b> so you get that error message.
    – DeiDei
    Dec 10, 2018 at 20:07
  • 1
    Cannot reproduce. This is why a mcve is important. Without knowing what the OP is actually using all we can offer is a guess. (While this answer is right, unless the OP is explicitly including <type_traits>, it really should't error. Unfortunetly gcc includes a lot of other headers if you just include <iostream> as you can see here) Dec 10, 2018 at 20:13
  • 2
    FWIW I think this is a bug in both clang and gcc. Will be posting an answer.
    – AndyG
    Dec 10, 2018 at 20:21
3

This is an issue that CGW 1835 deal with, citing it here:

According to 6.4.5 [basic.lookup.classref] paragraph

In a class member access expression (8.2.5 [expr.ref]), if the . or -> token is immediately followed by an identifier followed by a <, the identifier must be looked up to determine whether the < is the beginning of a template argument list (17.2 [temp.names]) or a less-than operator. The identifier is first looked up in the class of the object expression. If the identifier is not found, it is then looked up in the context of the entire postfix-expression and shall name a class template.

template<typename T> T end(T);
template<typename T>
bool Foo(T it) {
    return it->end < it->end;
}

since it is dependent and thus end cannot be looked up in the class of the object expression, it is looked up in the context of the postfix-expression. This lookup finds the function template, making the expression ill-formed.

One possibility might be to limit the lookup to the class of the object expression when the object expression is dependent.


#include <type_traits>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
bool comp_rank(const T &a, const T &b){
    return a.rank < b.rank; // fail
}

The error shows up even without instantiating the function template, the whole expression is dependent, hence they can't be looked up into the class scope. As the current wording of the standard is not clear if lookup for rank in the class scope will be deferred for dependent names or must be bound to names in the context of the postfix-expression that's what the CGW try to tackle.

a direct solution is to use parens:

template<typename T>
bool comp_rank(const T &a, const T &b){
    return (a.rank) < (b.rank);
}

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