10

I’m a Python newbie and have the following pandas dataframe - I’m trying to write code that populates the ‘signal’ column as it is below:

Days    long_entry_flag long_exit_flag  signal
 1      FALSE           TRUE    
 2      FALSE           FALSE   
 3      TRUE            FALSE            1
 4      TRUE            FALSE            1
 5      FALSE           FALSE            1
 6      TRUE            FALSE            1
 7      TRUE            FALSE            1
 8      FALSE           TRUE    
 9      FALSE           TRUE    
 10     TRUE            FALSE            1
 11     TRUE            FALSE            1
 12     TRUE            FALSE            1
 13     FALSE           FALSE            1
 14     FALSE           TRUE    
 15     FALSE           FALSE   
 16     FALSE           TRUE    
 17     TRUE            FALSE            1
 18     TRUE            FALSE            1
 19     FALSE           FALSE            1
 20     FALSE           FALSE            1
 21     FALSE           TRUE    
 22     FALSE           FALSE
 23     FALSE           FALSE

My pseudo-code version would take the following steps

  1. Look down the [‘long_entry_flag’] column until entry condition is True (day 3 initially)
  2. Then we enter ‘1’ into [‘signal’] column every day until exit condition is True [‘long_exit_flag’]==True on day 8
  3. Then we look back to [‘long_entry_flag’] column to wait for the next entry condition (occurs on day 10)
  4. And again we enter ‘1’ into [‘signal’] column every day until exit condition is True (day 14)
  5. etc

Welcome ideas about ways to populate the ‘signal’ column rapidly if possible (using vectorisation?) - this is a subset of a large dataframe with tens of thousands of rows, and it is one of many dataframes being analysed in sequence.

Many thanks in advance!

7

You can do

# Assuming we're starting from the "outside"
inside = False
for ix, row in df.iterrows():
    inside = (not row['long_exit_flag']
              if inside
              else row['long_entry_flag']
                  and not row['long_exit_flag']) # [True, True] case
    df.at[ix, 'signal'] = 1 if inside else np.nan

which is going to give you exactly the output you posted.


Being inspired by @jezrael's answer, I created a slightly more performant version of the above while still trying to keep it as neat as I could:

# Same assumption of starting from the "outside"
df.at[0, 'signal'] = df.at[0, 'long_entry_flag']
for ix in df.index[1:]:
    df.at[ix, 'signal'] = (not df.at[ix, 'long_exit_flag']
                           if df.at[ix - 1, 'signal']
                           else df.at[ix, 'long_entry_flag']
                               and not df.at[ix, 'long_exit_flag']) # [True, True] case

# Adjust to match the requested output exactly
df['signal'] = df['signal'].replace([True, False], [1, np.nan])
  • I appreciate this @jezrael but another disadvantage of my solution is that it requires a state. If you have an idea on how to make it stateless, preserve the state using apply (currying?) or do it in a vectorized way I'll be the first to upvote. – ayorgo Dec 11 '18 at 12:12
  • @ayorgo - added solution. – jezrael Dec 11 '18 at 12:50
  • @ayorgo, apologies for the late edit but your elegant solution works perfectly unless there are two FALSE days in a row at the same time when there is nothing in signal column - see additional lines on days 22-23 - in this situation your code produces '1' in the signal column on day 23 and it shouldn't - is there a simple fix that I'm missing? Or would this now be a new question? – Baz Dec 12 '18 at 5:17
  • @Baz, hmm, strange. Works on my machine. I mean both of the solutions above produce NaN at day 23. – ayorgo Dec 12 '18 at 7:59
  • However, it works as I wouldn't expect it to when both signals are True which I just fixed. – ayorgo Dec 12 '18 at 9:25
5

For improve performance use Numba solution:

arr = df[['long_exit_flag','long_entry_flag']].values

@jit
def f(A):
    inside = False
    out = np.ones(len(A), dtype=float)
    for i in range(len(arr)):
        inside = not A[i, 0] if inside else A[i, 1] 
        if not inside:
            out[i] = np.nan
    return out

df['signal'] = f(arr)

Performance:

#[21000 rows x 5 columns]
df = pd.concat([df] * 1000, ignore_index=True)

In [189]: %%timeit
     ...: inside = False
     ...: for ix, row in df.iterrows():
     ...:     inside = not row['long_exit_flag'] if inside else row['long_entry_flag']
     ...:     df.at[ix, 'signal'] = 1 if inside else np.nan
     ...: 
1.58 s ± 9.45 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

In [190]: %%timeit
     ...: arr = df[['long_exit_flag','long_entry_flag']].values
     ...: 
     ...: @jit
     ...: def f(A):
     ...:     inside = False
     ...:     out = np.ones(len(A), dtype=float)
     ...:     for i in range(len(arr)):
     ...:         inside = not A[i, 0] if inside else A[i, 1] 
     ...:         if not inside:
     ...:             out[i] = np.nan
     ...:     return out
     ...: 
     ...: df['signal'] = f(arr)
     ...: 
171 ms ± 2.86 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

In [200]: %%timeit
     ...: df['d'] = np.where(~df['long_exit_flag'],df['long_entry_flag'] | df['long_exit_flag'],np.nan)
     ...: 
     ...: df['new_select']= np.where(df['d']==0, np.select([df['d'].shift()==0, df['d'].shift()==1],[1,1], np.nan), df['d'])
     ...: 
2.4 ms ± 561 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

You can also use numpy for shifting, also @Dark code is simplify:

In [222]: %%timeit
     ...: d = np.where(~df['long_exit_flag'].values,  df['long_entry_flag'].values | df['long_exit_flag'].values, np.nan)
     ...: shifted = np.insert(d[:-1], 0, np.nan)
     ...: m = (shifted==0) | (shifted==1)
     ...: df['signal1']= np.select([d!=0, m], [d, 1], np.nan)
     ...: 
590 µs ± 35.7 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000 loops each)

EDIT:

You can also check Does iterrows have performance issues? for general order of precedence for performance of various operations in pandas.

  • 1
    Ah, alright. I forgot one can simply iterate over index. Always looking for the neatest thing. Thanks. – ayorgo Dec 11 '18 at 12:57
  • @jezrael do check the timings against my approach : ) – Dark Dec 11 '18 at 13:19
3

Here's an approach with complete boolean operations which is a vectorized approach and will be fast.

Step 1 : If long_exit_flag is True return Np.nan else apply or between long_entry_flag and long_exit_flag

df['d'] = np.where(df['long_exit_flag'], np.nan, df['long_entry_flag'] | df['long_exit_flag'])

Step 2 : Now its the state where the both the columns are false. We need to ignore it and replace the values with the previous state. Which can be done using where and select

df['new_signal']= np.where(df['d']==0, 
                  np.select([df['d'].shift()==0, df['d'].shift()==1],[1,1], np.nan),
                  df['d'])

    Days  long_entry_flag  long_exit_flag  signal    d  new_signal
0      1            False            True     NaN  NaN         NaN
1      2            False           False     NaN  0.0         NaN
2      3             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
3      4             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
4      5            False           False     1.0  0.0         1.0
5      6             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
6      7             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
7      8            False            True     NaN  NaN         NaN
8      9            False            True     NaN  NaN         NaN
9     10             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
10    11             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
11    12             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
12    13            False           False     1.0  0.0         1.0
13    14            False            True     NaN  NaN         NaN
14    15            False           False     NaN  0.0         NaN
15    16            False            True     NaN  NaN         NaN
16    17             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
17    18             True           False     1.0  1.0         1.0
18    19            False           False     1.0  0.0         1.0
19    20            False           False     1.0  0.0         1.0
20    21            False            True     NaN  NaN         NaN
  • 1
    Nice solution, I try numpy fy it - check edited my answer with new timings. – jezrael Dec 11 '18 at 13:46
  • I already upvoted sir. There might be a case which this solution might still not cover. Still curious. – Dark Dec 11 '18 at 13:48
  • I know it and already upvote too. Good luck! – jezrael Dec 11 '18 at 13:48
0
#let the long_exit_flag equal to 0 when the exit is TRUE
df['long_exit_flag_r']=~df.long_exit_flag_r
df.temp=''

for i in range(1,len(df.index)):
    df.temp[i]=(df.signal[i-1]+df.long_entry_flag[i])*df.long_exit_flag_r

if the temp is positive then the signal should be 1, if the temp is negative then the signal should be empty. (I kinda get stuck here)

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